Stuff I showed on my panel at AAAS

Since I don’t do PowerPoint but use the Web for presentations instead, and since the recordings from AAAS are not free (yes, you can buy them, I won’t), and since some people have asked me to show what I showed at my panel there, here is the list of websites I showed there. I opened them up all in reverse chronological order beforehand, so during the presentation itself all I needed to do was close each window as I was done with it to reveal the next window underneath.
I started with to explain the new interactive, collaborative methods in science journalism we discussed there.
Then I showed this series of tweets:
as an example of how that system can work:
I then showed how I filter my Twitter stream to eliminate much of it and only get to see what people I trust deem important:
I pointed out that some people got jobs on Twitter:
I showed how some people – including myself – got jobs on their blogs:
Then I showed an example of a PLoS ONE paper, as a center of an ecosystem, and the comments and links as an outer shell of that ecosystem:;jsessionid=2009BD9E7195AADA6D62474B19ABA3FE
I particularly showed the links to the blog posts aggregated on to show the reputability of science blogging in the current science publishing ecosystem.
Then I discussed
and as example showed how I collect important links about Dunbar Number from Twitter to FriendFeed for a future blog-post:
A blog-post or a series of them can lead to an MSM article, and perhaps a series of articles can lead to a book contract. But even without that, one can potentially have a blog post published in a book, e.g., in the Open Laboratory:
Finally, if one gets a book published, there is nobody organizing the marketing and the book tours any more, so I showed how Rebecca Skloot organized it herself, by tapping into her online community:

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