Some fun stats about the participants of ScienceOnline2011

While the public list of participants is still a little bit in flux – a few people just canceled and we scrambled to get some waitlisters in – the statistics on all of them are interesting (click on link to see large and play):

For example – 199 identified themselves as bloggers but 222 say they blog, so some people who use blogging software use it for something else they do not consider to be be blogging.

We have guests from eight countries: 264 from USA, 14 from Canada, 14 from the U.K., two from Netherlands, two from Germany, one from Ireland, one from Italy and one from Malaysia.

Canadians come from four different provinces: Ontario, Alberta, Nova Scotia and British Columbia.

Not all Brits are from Central London either, there are one each from Avon, Berkshire and Surrey.

We have guests from 35 states of the USA: NC – 95, NY – 42, CA – 20, DC – 10, IL – 9, MA – 8, PA – 7, VA – 7, GA – 6, FL – 5, MD – 5, TX – 5, CO – 4, IN – 4, MO – 3, SC – 3, WA – 3, WI – 3, CT – 2, DE – 2, IA – 2, KY – 2, TN – 2, AZ – 1, HI – 1, ID – 1, ME – 1, MN – 1, MT – 1, NH – 1, NJ – 1, NM – 1, OH – 1, OR – 1, UT – 1

Out of 95 from North Carolina, 75 reside in the Triangle area – the rest are spread from the mountains (Saluda), through Charlotte area, to the coast (e.g, Wilmington).

Check the stats yourself. We’ll also do some more later, e.g., the gender break-down etc. I think there will be 10 attendees younger than 18 years old, but I am not sure how old is the oldest participant (last year it was 75!) – there must be quite a range.

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3 responses to “Some fun stats about the participants of ScienceOnline2011

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  3. Hey, I’m interested in looking at the stats but the page says I’m not authorised to look at the results – tried to look at the pie charts but they’re too small to read.

    Thanks for the post, though.