Best of May at A Blog Around The Clock

I posted only 35 times in May.

In May I committed scienceblogging: Cicadas, or how I Am Such A Scientist, or a demonstration of good editing.

I also could not resist blogging something about the journalistic mindset – Is education what journalists do?

I went to Wake Forest University to give a workshop on science communication and compiled resources shown there: Scientific Communication all-you-can-eat Linkfest.

It was my birthday.

I keep interviewing attendees of ScienceOnline2011 – there are five new ones this month: Robin Lloyd, Thomas Peterson, Pascale Lane, Holly Bik and Seth Mnookin.

I made sure that the Scientific American Guest Blog was busy all month as well, full of great posts on a diversity of topics – check them all out:

Too Hard For Science? Recreating What Killed Pompeii By Charles Q. Choi

Kids Learn Better When You Bring Science Home By Peggy Ashbrook

Slabs, Sneakers, Gyres and the Grotesque By Matthew Garcia

Overboard: 28,800 toys and one man lost at sea By Lindsey Hoshaw

A True Duck Hunt: interview with Donovan Hohn By David Manly

How does a floating plastic duckie end up where it does? By Eric Heupel

How do you ID a dead Osama? By Christie Wilcox

Threat of Future Cyber Attacks by Al Qaeda Remains Low By Scott Borg

Did Rapid DNA Analysis Verify Osama Bin Laden’s Death? By Susanna Speier

Too Hard for Science? Dean Kamen–Defying Gravity By Charles Q. Choi

Too Hard for Science? Simulating the Human Brain By Charles Q. Choi

When, and Why, Did Everyone Stop Eating Gluten? By Diana Gitig

Bedbug Revival 2011: What You Need to Know By Amy Maxmen

Flying in the Coffin Corner–Air France Flight 447 By Keith Eric Grant

Too Hard for Science? Freeman Dyson–ESP By Charles Q. Choi

Too Hard for Science? Bora Zivkovic–Centuries to Solve the Secrets of Cicadas By Charles Q. Choi

So You Think You Know Why Animals Play… By Lynda Sharpe

Looking for Empathy in a Conflict-Ridden World By Kristina Bjoran

Too Hard for Science? An Early Warning System for Killer Asteroids By Charles Q. Choi

Levees and the illusion of Flood Control [Explainer] By Anne Jefferson

Curing Paralysis–Again By R. Douglas Fields

Too Hard for Science?–Journey to the Core of the Earth By Charles Q. Choi

The Data Are In Regarding Satoshi Kanazawa By Khadijah Britton

Physics and the Immortality of the Soul By Sean M. Carroll

The Evolution of Common Sense by John Wilkins.

The Politics of the Null Hypothesis By Stephanie Zvan.

Too Hard for Science? E. O. Wilson–A Vertical Map of Life on Earth By Charles Q. Choi.

Helium Hokum: Why Airships Will Never Be Part of Our Transportation Infrastructure By Joseph A. Dick.

Too Hard For Science? The Genetic Foundations of Intelligence By Charles Q. Choi.

Health Reporting and Its Sources By Hadas Shema.

We finished the Arctic series on the Expeditions blog: The Catlin Arctic Survey: Going home

And we started two new expeditions on the Expeditions blog – first one is from The South Pacific Islands Survey, with all posts written by Lindsey Hoshaw:

Destination: The Cook Islands!
Forecast: Stomach Turbulence
South Pacific Flotsam
We discover what’s floating in the Pacific Ocean!
Pop Quiz
5 Things You Didn’t Know about Life on a Boat
Our First Student Questions!
We’re in the Cook Islands!

The second one is a USC scientific diving class – Problems Without Passports: Scientific Research Diving at USC Dornsife – also in the Pacific, written by a whole collection of instructors and students:

Getting Ready for Guam and Palau By Jim Haw
Why Guam? By Jim Haw
Why Palau? By David Ginsburg
Catalina Island, by Caitlin Contag
The Endangered Endemics and the Aggressive Invader By Jim Haw
Some History Should Not Repeat Itself By Wendy Whitcombe
Contrasting Reef Ecosystems in Guam By Mareika Vandeveer and Justin Bogda
The News from Guam By Caitlin Contag

Previously in the “Best of…” series:

2011

April
March
February
January

2010

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2009

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

About these ads

One response to “Best of May at A Blog Around The Clock

  1. Pingback: Best on June 2011 at A Blog Around The Clock | A Blog Around The Clock