Category Archives: OpenLab08

Open Laboratory – old Prefaces and Introductions

One difference between reading Open Laboratory anthologies and reading the original posts included in them is that the printed versions are slightly edited and polished. Another difference is that the Prefaces and Introductions can be found only in the books. They have never been placed online.
But now that four books are out and we are halfway through collecting entries for the fifth one, when only the 2009 book is still selling, I think it is perfectly OK to place Prefaces and Introductions that I wrote myself online. I wrote Prefaces for the 2006, 2007 and 2008 book, as well as the Introduction for the 2006 one. The introductions for the subsequent editions were written by the year’s guest editor, i.e., Reed Cartwright in 2007, Jennifer Rohn in 2008, and SciCurious in 2009.
So, under the fold are my three Prefaces and one Introduction. See how the world (and my understanding of it) of the online science communication has changed over the last few years:

Continue reading

Everything you always wanted to know about The Open Laboratory

Walter Jessen of Next Generation Science interviewed me recently, mainly about the Open Laboratory, but also a little bit more about science blogging and Science 2.0. The interview is now live – you can read it here.

The Open Laboratory 2008….and 2009?

The Lulu.com page has already been viewed 1160 times, 30 blogs linked to it so far (see the bottom of the announcement post for the list), a very nice number of books (not tellin’, sorry) has already been sold, and review copies are on their way to American Scientist, The New Scientist and Seed (I am also expecting a call from Nature as they reviewed the previous two anthologies as well).
The book was the homepage Buzz on Scienceblogs.com the other day – see this for photographic evidence. And the Discover Magazine highlighted it in their March issue – see this.
The guest editor for 2009 will be announced next week so check back here in a few days.
In the meantime, start parsing through your blog archives since December 1st 2008 and start picking your best posts for the next anthology. You can now start submitting your entries via this submission form.

Teaser…..

Coming soon:
openlab08cover.JPG

The Open Laboaratory 2008 – the winning cartoon and poem

And the winners in these two categories are:
xkcd: Purity
Digital Cuttlefish: The Evolutionary Biology Valentine’s Day Poem

The Open Laboratory 2008 – and the Winners are…..

I know many of you are trembling in anticipation: “Did I make it this year?”. Well, it’s like the Oscars – the Academy Awards are kept tightly under wraps until the moment the envelope is opened.
The list of entries was long, and full of excellent posts – this was hard to judge!
And, Jennifer Rohn, this year’s Editor, just handed me the envelope. Trust me – I have not seen the list of winners myself until now.
And, the winners are…..
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Research with vulnerable populations: considering the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (part 1).
All My Faults are Stress-Related: Data, Interpretations and Field Work
Bad Astronomy: WR 104: A nearby gamma-ray burst?
Bayblab: A History of Beardism and the Science that Backs It
Cabinet of Wonders: A Rule of Thumb
Catalogue of Organisms: Are You Sucking on a Lemon or a Lime?
Charles Darwin’s Blog: Someone should invent a device to look at the micro world
Cognitive Daily: How to make your eye feel like it’s closed, when it’s actually open
Cosmic Variance: The First Quantum Cosmologist
Dear Blue Lobster: Bloop: A Crustacean Phenomenon?
Denialism blog: Fountain pens
Dr. Jekyll & Mrs. Hyde: Why I blog….
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part I
Green Gabbro: The Igneous Petrology of Ice Cream
Hope for Pandora: Dear Reviewer
The Beagle Project Blog: Detecting natural selection: a pika’s tale
Laelaps: Who scribbled all over Darwin’s work?
Life, Birds, and Everything: Do we see what bees see?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Audubon’s Aviary: Portraits of Endangered Species
Mad Scientist, Jr.: Brain Extractions
Marmorkrebs: How Marmorkrebs can make the world a better place
Mind the Gap: In which science becomes a sport – hypothetically speaking
Minor Revisions: To Whom it May Concern
Nano2Hybrids: What IS a carbon nanotube?
Neurotic Physiology: Uber Coca, by Sigmund Freud, (reposted on Neurotopia 2.0: Uber Coca, by Sigmund Freud)
Not Exactly Rocket Science: Space Invader DNA jumped across mammalian genomes
Nothing’s Shocking: Poster session paparazzi
Observations of a Nerd: Having Some Fun With Evolution
Plus magazine – news from the world of maths: United Kingdom – Nil Points
Podblack Blog: Smart Bitches, Not Meerly Sex
Pondering Pikaia: Social Clocks: How do cave bats know when it is dark outside?
Providentia: Dr. Fliess’ Patient
Quintessence of Dust: Finches, bah! What about Darwin’s tomatoes?
Reciprocal Space: I get my kicks from thermodynamicks!
Rubor Dolor Calor Tumor: Calor?
Science After Sunclipse: Physics Makes a Toy of the Brain
Sciencewomen: A reckless proposal, or ‘Scientists are people too, and it’s time we started treating them that way.’
Terra Sigilatta: Liveblogging the Vasectomy Chronicles
The End Of The Pier Show: On The Hardness of Biology
The Loom: Even Blood Flukes Get Divorced
The OpenHelix Blog: The Beginnings of Immunofluorescence
The Oyster’s Garter: How a coccolithophore without its plates is like a grin without a cat
The Scientist: On the Nature of Networking
The Tree of Life: What is so bad about brain doping? Apparently, NIH thinks something is.
Tom Paine’s Ghost: Biochemistry of Halloween: Installment 1
Tomorrow’s Table: 10 Things about GE crops to Scratch From Your Worry List
Uncertain Principles: We Are Science
Wired Science Blog: Correlations: The Third Branch of Science?
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Expect The Unexpected
The winners in the poetry and cartoon categories will be announced tomorrow, right here, same place, same time.
Update: the winners in the cartoon and poetry categories are:
xkcd: Purity
Digital Cuttlefish: The Evolutionary Biology Valentine’s Day Poem

ScienceOnline09 on Radio In Vivo

scienceonline09.jpg
As you know, Anton Zuiker, David Kroll and I were on the radio earlier today, chatting for an hour with Ernie Hood of Radio In Vivo, here in Carrboro.
We discussed science communication, education, publishing, blogging, popularization, journalism, social networking, Second Life, etc. The focus was on ScienceOnline09, but we also mentioned The Open Laboratory anthologies (2006, 2007 and 2008), LabLit.com, the NCCU BRITE, Duke Health, Inside Duke Medicine, PLoS, BlogTogether, SCONC and, of course, our blogs.
Try to find an hour of peace and quiet and listen to the show here (mp3).
And then check out the podcasts of the old Radio In Vivo science shows – there are some excellent previous shows with great scientists.

Update:
David took some pictures – you can see them here.

The Open Laboratory 2008 – all the submissions fit to print

It’s midnight! So, the submission form is now closed.
Over the past year we have collected hundreds of excellent entries for the anthology – thanks to all who made the submissions.
Jennifer Rohn has lined up some star people to judge all the entries, and in the end, we’ll have the best 50 (plus a poem and a cartoon/image) published in a book with Lulu.com. We will announce the winners in a couple of weeks or so, but in the meantime, bookmark this post – this is the best of science blogging for the year!
And if the winter break is long enough for you to read all of these entries and still crave more – you can read the The Open Laboratory: The Best Writing on Science Blogs 2006 and The Open Laboratory: The Best Science Writing on Blogs 2007 all over again. We are hoping to have the book out and ready for sale before the ScienceOnline09 so we can sell some copies right then and there.
So, here are ALL the entries for The Open Laboratory 2008:
==================================
49 percent: Textbooks and reproduction– why they gotta embellish?
49 percent: *groan*
49 percent: She said to no one in particular
A Blog Around the Clock: The Nobel Prize conundrum
A Blog Around The Clock: Science vs. Britney Spears
A Blog Around The Clock: Domestication – it’s a matter of time (always is for me, that’s my ‘hammer’ for all nails)
A Blog Around The Clock: Scientists are Excellent Communicators (‘Sizzle’ follow-up)
A Blog Around The Clock: Why do earthworms come up to the surface after the rain?
A Blog Around The Clock: Clock Classics: It all started with the plants
A Blog Around The Clock: The Future is Here and it is Bright: Interview with Anne-Marie Hodge
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Expect The Unexpected
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Lost In Translation? Part I: What Is Incommensurability And Why Should I Care?
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Lost In Translation? Part II: Kuhnian Incommensurability
A Developing Passion: Wunderpus photogenicus!
A Developing Passion: Realize your potential!
A Free Man: Weird Fishes and the Origin of Fingers
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: The MMR vaccine and autism – truth, lies and the media
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: Breath-taking insanity
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: Transatlantic STDs
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: In Response to an Animal Rights Apologist
A k8, a cat, a mission: Providing and nurturing
A k8, a cat, a mission: We can count on each other
A k8, a cat, a mission: Open Access Day
A Mad Tea-Party: Birds of a feather?
A Mad Tea-Party: Bigfoot, Nessie, and the 40-hour Work Week
A Mad Tea-Party: Swimming With The Big Kids
A Meandering Scholar: Braindrain
A Somewhat Old, But Capacious Handbag: Maladaptation
Aardvarchaeology: The Strange Fate of the First Christian Burials on Gotland
Aardvarchaeology: Investigating the Field of Saint Olaf
Adventures in Applied Math: Things I Love about My Job
Adventures in Applied Math: Game Theory and Human Behavior, Part I
Adventures in Applied Math: Game Theory and Human Behavior, Part II
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Girls, boys, and Math
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Research with vulnerable populations: considering the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (part 1).
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Research with vulnerable populations: considering the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (part 2).
Adventures in Ethics and Science: The Hellinga Retractions (part 1): when replication fails, what should happen next?
Adventures in Ethics and Science: The Hellinga retractions (part 2): trust, accountability, collaborations, and training relationships.
Aetiology: What’s it like to work an Ebola outbreak?
Aetiology: Where did syphilis come from?
All My Faults are Stress-Related: Data, Interpretations and Field Work
All My Faults are Stress-Related: Analogies, analog modeling, and squashed chocolate
Almost Diamonds: Diversity Now
Amphidrome: Crabs and Barnacles of the Texas Panhandle
Antimatter: The Big Bang and the Mind of God
Antimatter: Hamilton and maths week in Ireland
Antimatter: Zeilinger in Ireland
Antimatter: Town, gown and college life
Antimatter: Standard Model at Trinity College
Antimatter: LHC: Hawking v Higgs
Antimatter: Science week, Walton and the LHC
Antimatter: Do anti-depressants work?
Antimatter: The Standard Model
Antimatter: Supersymmetry
Antimatter: Cambridge conference review
Antimatter: Hubble puzzle
Antimatter: Hubble solution
Antimatter: The Denial of Global Warming
Archaeoastronomy: A Sapphic Ode to Pan scientiae
Archaeoporn: Moral Dilemas in Teaching Anthropology
Archaeoporn:
A Reivew of Methodology in ‘Biblical Entheogens’

Archaeoporn: Discovery Channel, Teaching the Debate
Archaeoporn: Muslim Sailors, A Skeptical Redux
Archy: A Century of Tunguska
Archy: On Planets X and Names
Backreaction: We have only ourselves to judge on each other
Backreaction: Blaise Pascal, Florin Perier, and the Puy de Dome experiment
Backreaction: The Equivalence Principle
Backreaction: The Spirits that We Called
Backyard Arthropod Project: Snow Fly – Chionea valga
Backyard Arthropod Project: Carpet Beetle Larva
Bad Astronomy: Is science faith-based?
Bad Astronomy: WR 104: A nearby gamma-ray burst?
Bad Astronomy: Vaccines do not cause autism!
Bayblab: Fact or Fiction: Tryptophan Turkey Sleep
Bayblab: A History of Beardism and the Science that Backs It
Biocurious: We need to stop pigeon-holing science
BioJobBlog: Academia: A Feudal System That Is Running on Empty
Biological Ramblings: New species in 2008
Biological Ramblings: Avian relationships – What do we know?
Blind.Scientist: How to improve scientific software?
Blogfish: Saving the ocean with guilt or desire?
Blogging the PhD: Multidiscipline
Bootstrap Analysis: Malnourished waterfowl dying in Michigan-Ontario
Boston blog: What is fair play in the blogo/commentosphere?
BrainBlogger: The Human Injury of Lost Objectivity
Brontossauros em meu Jardim: Personal Genomes will be the new horoscope
Bug Girl’s Blog: Do those mosquito zapper things really work?
Bug Girl’s Blog: Pubic Lice: ‘Sea monkeys in your pants’
Building confidence: Big data: an informaticians best friend
Building confidence: We need to create a market for genetic-association data
Cabinet of Wonders: A Rule of Thumb
Carbon Nation: The Giant’s Shoulders: Edwin Salpeter edition
Catalogue of Organisms: The Strangest of Spiders
Catalogue of Organisms: The Origins of Flowers
Catalogue of Organisms: Conversations with Cothurnocystis
Catalogue of Organisms: Are You Sucking on a Lemon or a Lime?
Catalogue of Organisms: Eating Mum from the Inside Out
Charles Darwin’s blog: If only I’d had a magic results machine in 1836…
Charles Darwin’s Blog: Someone should invent a device to look at the micro world
Chem-bla-ics: Open{Data|Source|Standards} is not enough: we need Open Projects
Clastic Detritus: Petroleum Resources and the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)
Cocktail Party Physics: tit for tat
Cocktail Party Physics: hot capillary action
Coding Horror: How Should We Teach Computer Science?
Coding Horror: The Years of Experience Myth
Coding Horror: I Repeat: Do Not Listen to Your Users
Coding Horror: Designing For Evil
Coding Horror: The Greatest Invention in Computer Science
Coffee & Conservation: Know your coffee birds: Jacu
Coffee Talk: What motherhood has taught me
Cognitive Daily: Changing belief in free will can cause students to cheat
Cognitive Daily: How to make your eye feel like it’s closed, when it’s actually open
Cognitive Daily: Will video games solve sex-discrimination in science?
Cognitive Daily: Toddlers play with impossibly small toys as if they’re the real thing
Cognitive Daily: The origins of the study of memory
Cognitive Daily: A baby’s psychological development at age 6 months
Cosmic Variance: The First Quantum Cosmologist
Cosmic Variance: Dark Photons
Cosmic Variance: The Physics of Chocolate
DamnGoodTechnician: Why I’m a tech
Dara Sosulski’s blog: Quantum Keats
Denialism blog: My New Product: All Natural Pb
Denialism blog: Why good medicine requires materialism
Denialism blog: There is no such thing as alternative medicine
Denialism blog: I’m a holistic doctor
Denialism blog: Were the ancients fools?
Denialism blog: Fountain pens
Denialism blog: Try and beat this one, alties!
Dear Blue Lobster: Bloop: A Crustacean Phenomenon?
Deep Sea News: Mommy, Where Do Dwarf Male Harems Come From?
Deep Sea News: The Big 3: Shrimp, Tuna, and Salmon
Deep Sea News: Dumping Pharmaceutical Waste In The Deep Sea
Deep Sea News: You Should Fear and Respect the Radula
Deep Sea News: An Update On Nautilus Mining
Deep Sea News: Does Lightning Kill Marine Animals?
Deep Sea News: Hydromedusa Mounts Ninja Style Invasion
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: The Hierarchical Structure of Bad Writing
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: The Deeper Meaning of a Residual Plot
Digital Cuttlefish: Danger! Warning!
Digital Cuttlefish: The singularity can’t come soon enough
Digital Cuttlefish: The Evolutionary Biology Valentine’s Day Poem
Digital Cuttlefish: Apology 130 to William Shakespeare
Digital Cuttlefish: I Am The Very Model Of A Devious Creationist
Digital Cuttlefish: How Chromosome Numbers Change
Digital Cuttlefish: Oh Ye Of Little Faith
Digital Cuttlefish: I Am Charles Darwin
Dreams and hopes of a (post doc) scientist: Why I (shouldn’t) don’t tell too many people what I (really) do
Dreams and hopes of a (post doc) scientist: TLR, PPR, cytokines and signaling
Dr. Jekyll & Mrs. Hyde: Why I blog….
Dr. Mom, My Adventures as a Mommy-Scientist: The Long and Winding Road
Dr Petra’s blog: Well, you can tell by the way I use my walk I’m a vaginal orgasm woman, no time to talk
Dr Petra’s blog: Superdrug and sex supplements – should you take Viapro?
Dr Petra’s blog: How latest UK trafficking statistics don’t quite add up
Dr Petra’s blog: Ooh! Ooh! Ooh! Watch the media get into a feeding frenzy over the latest g-spot research
DrugMonkey (PhysioProf): Academic Science: Not A Care Bears Fucking Tea Party
DrugMonkey (PhysioProf): Why Comrade PhysioProf Loves Teaching Medical Physiology
DrugMonkey (DrugMonkey): Most Scientists are Perfectly Happy Not Publishing in GlamourMagz
DrugMonkey (DrugMonkey): It Doesn’t Hurt a Bit to Be ‘That Guy’
Dynamic Earth: Expanding Earth and the Conspiracy of Science
Dynamics of Cats: Physics Made Magical
Earth Impacts: Home Climate
Earth Impacts: Your Radioactive Kitchen
Earth Impacts: Stop Illegal Climate Immigration
Ed Boyden’s Blog: Research as a Community-Building Activity
evolgen: The Probability of Winning the NBA Draft Lottery
Effect Measure: More on the human trials of a ‘universal’ flu vaccine
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part I
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part II
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part III
Effect Measure: What killed people in the 1918 flu?
Effect Measure: The problem of testing the effectiveness of bird flu vaccines
Effect Measure: Why fever screening at airports is unlikely to work
Effect Measure: Why the Right Wing attacks science
eTrilobite: Walcott’s Quarry #28: Council of Hallucigenia (cartoon)
evolgen: How many genes do you share with your twentieth cousin?
Evolutionary Novelties: Gould: Pluralism by monism
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part One
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part II
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part Three
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part Four
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Conclusion
Evolving Thoughts: Darwin, God and chance
Evolving Thoughts: Fallacies on Fallacies
Evolving Thoughts: Aristotle on the mayfly
Evolving Thoughts: On Ontology and Metaphysics: Substance Abuse
Expression Patterns: What will you be?
Expression Patterns: Last Saturday
Expression Patterns: This is my brain on grad school
Expression Patterns: How to get scientists to adopt web 2.0 technologies
Extreme Biology: Humorless Homework
FairerScience: Sid the Science Kid: A Review
Female Science Professor: Journal Matchmaking
FemaleScienceProfessor: The Best Woman
Fine Structure: Parton Distribution Functions
Freelancing science: Freelancing science – today and tomorrow
Freelancing science: By any measure I’m average at most
Further thoughts: Disturbance and recovery in tropical dry forests
Further thoughts: Rethinking the way we study ecological succession
Further thoughts: What is natural? Reinterpreting rivers in the eastern US
Further thoughts: Teaching undergrads how to use online literature
Further thoughts: Bt cotton and the evolution of resistance
Giovanna Di Sauro’s blog: Who’s afraid of Bisphenol A? (part 1)
Giovanna Di Sauro’s blog: Who’s afraid of Bisphenol A? (part 2)
Good Math, Bad Math: The Genius of Donald Knuth: Typesetting with Boxes and Glue
Green Gabbro: The Igneous Petrology of Ice Cream
Green Gabbro: The Metamorphic Petrology of Ice Cream
Green Gabbro: The Sedimentary Geology of Ice Cream
Greg Laden’s Blog: Cultural Evolution from Mosquitos to Worm Grunting
Greg Laden’s blog: Size and Scaling in Hominid Evolution
Greg Laden’s blog: Stone Age Graveyard Reveals Lifestyles of a Green Sahara
Greg Laden’s blog: The Scientific, Political, Social, and Pedagogical Context for the claim that ‘Race does not exist.’
Greg Laden’s blog: The Political Gender Gap
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel: To Equine Things There is a Season (guest post by Barn Owl)
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel: Otocephaly in the Guinea Pig
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel: Earliest Axons in the Early Bird Embryo
GumbyTheCat: The Texas Two-Step
GumbyTheCat: An Open Letter To Creationists
Highly Allochthonous: Where the Earth’s magnetic field comes from
Highly Allochthonous: Active, dormant, and extinct volcanoes
Hope for Pandora: Dear Reviewer
Huckleberry Days: What’s flowering in the Delta this week: wild morning-glory
Humans in Science: National Science Policies – Upheaval in France
Humans in Science: Green tea shenanigans
Hypo-theses: Geology and Beer
Ilovebacteria.com blog: Evolution isn’t perfect…
Isis the Scientist: Isis’s Super Family Fun Day
It’s a Micro World after all: Primum non nocere – Part I
It’s a Micro World after all: Celebrity Death Match – Biodiesel vs. Bioethanol (Part I)
It’s a Micro World after all: Celebrity Death Match – Biodiesel vs Bioethanol (Part II)
It’s a Micro World after all: Bacterial Farts – Part Deux
I was lost but now I live here: Departmental retreats: academia with a twist of karaoke
I was lost but now I live here: The future of science, gradical change, and tools for the people
Jacks of Science: Using Adobe Photoshop for Research and Profit
Jacks of Science: White Stuff and Black Stuff That People Like
Joel on Software: Architecture astronauts take over
Juniorprof: Why I support open access
Juniorprof: Postdoc to PI transition
Knowing and Doing: No One Programs Any More
Knowing and Doing: Scripting Languages, Software Development, and Novice Programmers
Knowing and Doing: Math and Computing as Art
Laelaps: Reaction to Darwin’s Descent
Laelaps: Geese from barnacles
Laelaps: Thomas Jefferson’s All-American incognitum
Laelaps: Wallowing dinosaurs and birds on the 5th day
Laelaps: The life, and death, of Ota Benga
Laelaps: John Daniel, the civilized gorilla
Laelaps: Evolutionary Phreno-Geology
Laelaps: Who scribbled all over Darwin’s work?
Lecturer Notes: Getting Anyone to expand their horizons is hard
Life, Birds, and Everything: Do we see what bees see?
Life of a Lab Rat: Squeeze Me
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Northeastern Bats Mysteriously Dying in the Thousands
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): There Are More Giraffe Species Than You Think
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Audubon’s Aviary: Portraits of Endangered Species
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): America’s Food Availability Crisis
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Science Blogging for Scientists: Planting the Seed
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Lovebird Behavior: Nature or Nurture?
Lunartalks: The Gordian Worm (or what Gordon Brown is doing to Britain).
Mad Scientist, Jr.: Brain Extractions
Magma Cum Laude: Cenozoic magmatism and the subduction of the Farallon Slab
Mario’s Entangled Bank: The Year of Evolution in the age of Open Access
Marmorkrebs: How Marmorkrebs can make the world a better place
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: The Future of Science
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: Open science
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: Why the world needs quantum mechanics
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: Quantum computing for everyone
Microecos: Dust. Wind. Dude. Or, the comparative social phenology of Girls Gone Wild and Socrates
Mild Opinons: Ideal free ducks
Mindshavings: The Impossible Lamp
Mind the Gap: In which two dreams and an episode of CSI change the course of history
Mind the Gap: In which my dreams come true
Mind the Gap: In which we retreat
Mind the Gap: In which words stick
Mind the Gap: In which science becomes a sport – hypothetically speaking
Mind The Gap: In which work follows me on holiday
Mind the Gap: In which I am star-struck by the invisible world
Mindshavings: Further Recursion Excursion
Minor Revisions: To Whom it May Concern
My Favourite Places: Pepijn’s Livingroom Urban Research Program (PLURP)
Nano2Hybrids: Girly Girls in Science
Nano2Hybrids: Ethical Scientist Code
Nano2Hybrids: What IS a carbon nanotube?
Neuroanthropology: Poverty Poisons the Brain
Neuroanthropology: Girls closing math gap?: Troubles with intelligence #1
Neuroanthropology: Studying Sin
Neuroanthropology: Cultural Aspects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Thinking on Meaning and Risk
NeuroDojo: Making mimetics scientific
Neurophilosophy: Wilder Penfield: Neural Cartographer
Neurotic Physiology: Uber Coca, by Sigmund Freud
Neurotic Physiology: Passage of an Iron Rod through the Head
Neurotic Physiology: Diabetes Insipidus as a Sequel to a Gunshot Wound of the Head
Neurotic Physiology: Broca’s Area, 1865
Neurotic Physiology: Weird Science Friday REDUX
Neurotopia 2.0: An Essay on the Shaking Palsy
Neurotopia 2.0: Warm fuzzies and getting to know your profs
Neurotopia 2.0: Birds of a Feather in Academia
NoR: Feature Creep I
Not Exactly Rocket Science: Scientists heart journalists? Plus a quick guide to dealing with the media
Not Exactly Rocket Science: Space Invader DNA jumped across mammalian genomes
Nothing’s Shocking: The laboratory isn’t a safe place for experiments anymore
Nothing’s Shocking: Poster session paparazzi
NOVA Geoblog: Perspectives on coastal tectonics
Observations of a Nerd: Having Some Fun With Evolution
Observations of a Nerd: Religion v. Science: the fallacy of Intelligent Design
Of Two Minds: How to Sex a Chick
On Becoming a Domestic and Laboratory Goddess: Where Dr. Isis Tells the Students to Sack Up….
One Big Lab: Envisioning the scientific community as One Big Lab
Open Reading Frame: An Open Access partisan’s view of ‘Electronic Publication and the Narrowing of Science and Scholarship’
O’Really?: Famous for fifteen people
O’Really?: If Science was an Olympic Sport…
Ouroboros: The evolution of negligible senescence
Over Land, Under Sea: Ode to a Horseshoe Crab
Panda’s Thumb: Choosey Peahens Choose Evolution
Panda’s Thumb: ID: Intelligent Design as Imitatio Dei (report on the 2007 ‘Wistar Retrospective Symposium’)
Panda’s Thumb: A Follow-Up on Evolution and Thermodynamics
Panda’s Thumb: Scientific Vacuity of ID: Lactose Digestion in E. coli
Panthera studentessa: What ecology is NOT
Partially Attended: Why the LHC is not really that impressive
Pharyngula: Old scientists never clean out their refrigerators
Pharyngula: Snake segmentation
Pharyngula: Evolving snake fangs
Pharyngula: Epigenetics
Pharyngula: Amphioxus and the evolution of the chordate genome
Pharyngula: Reproductive history writ in the genome
Pharyngula: Plant and animal development compared
Pharyngula: Where do the hagfish fit in?
Pharyngula: Reprogramming the pancreas
Pharyngula: Basics: Sonic Hedgehog
Pharyngula: My connection to Sonic Hedgehog
Physiology physics woven fine: Neural Networking, Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Share a Few Things
Plus magazine – news from the world of maths: United Kingdom – Nil Points
Podblack Blog: The Specialness Of Species
Podblack Blog: Looking Good – Scientifically
Podblack Blog: Smart Bitches, Not Meerly Sex
Podblack Blog: She’s Already Got Science – Women, Skepticism And The Need For More Research
Podblack Blog: Political Punditry on McCain’s Magical Thinking
Podblack Blog: The Sarah Silverman Of Skepticism
Podblack Blog: Classic Science Paper: Belief in Fortune Telling Amongst College Students
Podblack Blog: Political Punditry on McCain’s Magical Thinking
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part One
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part Two
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part Three
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part Four
Podblack Blog: ‘Tis the Season For Superstition
Podblack Blog: Are U(FO) Dreaming Of A Paranormal Christmas?
Pondering Pikaia: Social Clocks: How do cave bats know when it is dark outside?
Potspoon!: The New Environmentally-Friendly (?!?!) Plastic
Prairie Mary: Religion for Scientists
Principles of Neurobiotaxis: The evolution and evolvability of modularity in the brain
Professor Douglas Kell’s blog: To blogin at the bloginning
Providentia: Dr. Fliess’ Patient
Public Rambling: Post-publication journals
Quintessence of Dust: Finches, bah! What about Darwin’s tomatoes?
Rants of a Feminist Engineer: Stories of an academic panel discussion
Reciprocal Space: I hate blogs, bloggers and blogging
Reciprocal Space: The battle for my eternal soul
Reciprocal Space: I depend on the kindness of strangers
Reciprocal Space: I get my kicks from thermodynamicks!
rENNISance woman: Nobody expects…
rENNISance woman: My first Nature paper
rENNISance woman: Submit your neologisms here
Rubor Dolor Calor Tumor: Calor?
Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week: Sauropod pneumaticity, the early years
Science After Sunclipse: The Necessity of Mathematics
Science After Sunclipse: Physics Makes a Toy of the Brain
Science After Sunclipse: An Alloy of Pleasures
Science After Sunclipse: Curently Reading: Just Add Exploding Spaceship Edition
Science After Sunclipse: The EmDrive Story, or How to Propel Pseudoscience
Science After Sunclipse: Dawkins and the D-Word
Science After Sunclipse: Cinematic Combinatorics
Science After Sunclipse: Reverse the Baryon Flux Polarity!
Sciencebase Science Blog: Dark Energy
Science behind the scenes: Time to come home, love…
Science behind the scenes: From the Antarctic to biofueling America – Marc Pomeroy
Science behind the scenes: Cam and Kinari Webb
Science Blog: Modern Cosmology
Science in the open: Avoid the pain and embarassment – make all the raw data available
Science in the open: How I got into open science – a tale of opportunism and serendipity
Sciencewomen: Prioritizing research time
Sciencewomen: A reckless proposal, or ‘Scientists are people too, and it’s time we started treating them that way.’
Sciencewomen: Academic foolishness
Sciencewomen: Ask a ScienceBlogger: Why do I blog?
Sciencewomen: Engineer, thy name is enlightenment hero
Sciencewomen: What will academia (need to) look like when gas is $20/gallon?
Sciphu: The Swedish Chlamydia Mystery
See Jane Compute: The care and feeding of research students
Skulls in the Stars: The gallery of failed atomic models, 1903-1913
Skulls in the Stars: What a drag: Arago’s Experiment (1810)
Skulls in the Stars: ‘Interference between different photons never occurs:’ Not! (1963)
Skulls in the Stars: The discovery, rediscovery, and re-rediscovery of computed tomography
Stop Procrastinating: You Can All Sleep Sound Tonight
Stripped Science: Last question (comic strip)
Stripped Science: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008 (comic strip)
Swans on Tea: ‘Classic’ Timekeeping, Part I
Swans on Tea: ‘Classic’ Timekeeping, Part II
Swans on Tea: ‘Classic’ Timekeeping, Part III
Swans on Tea: Optipessimism
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: Respect Astrology
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: One Gene, One Trait? (Part 1 in a series)
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: One Gene, One Trait? (Part 2)
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: One Gene, One Trait? (Part 3)
Terra Sigilatta: Liveblogging the Vasectomy Chronicles
Terra Sigilatta: Is organic chemistry still relevant in the pre-medical curriculum?
Tetrapod Zoology: Sleep behaviour and sleep postures
The Beagle Project Blog: Genomics and plant evolution: blogging on my own peer reviewed research
The Beagle Project Blog: Detecting natural selection: a pika’s tale
The Beagle Project Blog: Saving Darwin’s muse
The Beagle Project Blog: A guest post by Wallace’s Rottweiler on the 150th anniversary of natural selection.
The Beagle Project Blog: Would that which we call a rose, by a DNA barcode, smell as sweet?
The Bean Chronicles: At home again
The Big Room: A small modification of Koch’s plating method
The Daily Transcript: From Metabolism to Oncogenes and Back – Part I
The Daily Transcript: From Metabolism to Oncogenes and Back – Part II
The Daily Transcript: From Metabolism to Oncogenes and Back – Part III
The Dragon’s Tales: Once Upon the Permian: Gazes of Fear
The Dragon’s Tales: Once Upon the Permian: Beaked Bites of a Lost Lineage
The Dragon’s Tales: The Ecology of the Carbon Age
The Dragon’s Tales: The Caste Ecology of the Age of Carbon
The Dragon’s Tales: Gasping for Paleo Air
The Dragon’s Tales: Were the Basal Archosaurs Endothermic?
The End of the Pier Show: Ashtrays and Authority
The End Of The Pier Show: On The Hardness of Biology
The Filter: Choose Research
The Flying Trilobite: Haldane’s Precambrian Puzzle
The Flying Trilobite: Flying & Asthma
The Flying Trilobite: Support The Beagle Project with Flying Trilobite Reproductions (just the art, instead of a cartoon)
The Flying Trilobite: Haldane’s Precambrian Puzzle (the picture)
The Green Grok: Understanding Oil
The Gulf Stream: The Accidental Locavore
The Ideophone: Migration stories
The Ideophone: Zotero, an Endnote alternative
The Ideophone: Under the spell of ideophones
The Ideophone: Fresh wild melon and meat full of gravy: food texture verbs in G|ui (Khoisan)
The Inverse Square Blog: Friday (Isaac) Newton Blogging: Monday Cosmology Edition
The Inverse Square Blog: 2%: The US Civil War, mathematics, and why we have already lost in Iraq
The Inverse Square Blog: Bad Science Kills People: Bush administration/heroin edition.
The Inverse Square Blog: A Little Weekend Palin/Physics Snark
The Loom: Whales: From So Humble A Beginning…
The Loom: The Clock That Breeds
The Loom: Even Blood Flukes Get Divorced
The Loom: The Allure of Big Antlers
The Loom: The Bird That Dare Not Speak Its Name
The Loom: A New Step In Evolution
The Loom: Dawn of the Picasso fish
The Mouse Trap: Evolution of Life: the eight stage process repeating again and again?
The Mouse Trap: The (eight) basic adaptive problems faced by all animals (esp humans)
The Musings of a Life-Long Scholar: Because I like it
The Musings of a Life-Long Scholar: How I became a Geologist
The Musings of a Life-Long Scholar: Connecting Microscopic and Continental Scales
The Natural Patriot: Biodiversity and the limits to growth
The OpenHelix Blog: The Beginnings of Immunofluorescence
The Other 95%: Right Whale Lice
The Oyster’s Garter: Urochordata, Urochordata, Rah, Rah, Rah!
The Oyster’s Garter: Perverted cannibalistic hermaphrodites haunt the Pacific Northwest!
The Oyster’s Garter: How a coccolithophore without its plates is like a grin without a cat
The RNA Underworld: De novo origination of a gene encoding a functional protein
The Scientific Activist: Why Are Veins Blue?
The Scientific Activist: Do You Want to Be Able to Crap Gold?
The Scientific Activist: Water on Mars, Part 1
The Scientist: On depression–a personal perspective
The Scientist: On the Nature of Networking
The Scientist: We are Stardust
The Sciphu Weblog: Now this is why we need genetic counselors
The Sciphu Weblog: How everything is a mess and still ok
The Sciphu Weblog: Was it all in vain ? The scientific method tale
The Skeptical Alchemist: From chance to function: the story of one gene (part 1)
The Skeptical Alchemist: From chance to function: the story of one gene (part 2)
The Skeptical Alchemist: From chance to function: the story of one gene (part 3)
The Tree of Life: The Fake Science News (or, Spitzer on OA): Eisen Resigns in Disgrace Over Scandal
The Tree of Life: What is so bad about brain doping? Apparently, NIH thinks something is.
The Tree of Life: Freeing My Father’s Scientific Publications
The Tree of Life: Tracing the evolutionary history of Sarah Palin: links to a parasitic nematode and the pathogenic fungus Botryotinia fuckeliana
The Wild Side: Cancer of the Devil
Thesis – with Children: What is Fair?
Thesis – with Children: The Semi-Adult
Thinking is Dangerous: Bluffer’s Guide to Consumer-Related Science Papers
Thoughts from Kansas: King penguin becomes a knight; his relatives are endangered by global warming
Thoughts from Kansas: The business of psychics
Thoughts from Kansas: Back to the framing wars
Thoughts from Kansas: With friends like these, or Tony Campolo gets eaten by the Hitler zombie
Thus Spake Zuska: The Proper Way To Be A Woman In Science
Tomorrow’s Table: The Whirlpool of Scientific Thought
Tomorrow’s Table: 10 Things about GE crops to Scratch From Your Worry List
Tomorrow’s Table: Blogging from Bangladesh, part 5 of 7
Tom Paine’s Ghost: Biochemistry of Halloween: Installment 1
Tom Paine’s Ghost: Freedom of the Genetic Press? Can newly created letters of life’s alphabet be patented?
Uncertain Principles: Physical Theories Squeak When You Chew Them
Uncertain Principles: What Everyone Should Know About Science
Uncertain Principles: The Innumeracy of Intellectuals
Uncertain Principles: We Are Science
Uncertain Principles: Relative Dog Motion
Uncertain Principles: Everything is Relative in the Magic Closet
UsefulChem: Experimental Uncertainty Principle
UsefulChem: Science is about mistrust
Web 2.0 and Semantic Web for Bioinformatics: Open Access, Science Commons, Open Science
What is interesting me today?: Science – the new cool?
What is Life?: Work and Life Balance & Importance of Sleep!
What is Life?: Who am I?
Wired Science: The Nanotech Antidote to Food Poisoning
Wired Science: Semen Proteomics Sheds Light on Loyalty and Evolution
Wired Science: Molecular Evidence that Broccoli Fights Prostate Cancer
Wired Science: Gene Editing Could Make Anyone Immune to AIDS
Wired Science: Experimental Drug Makes the Immune System Revolt Against Cancer
Wired Science: Should Scientists Date People Who Believe in Astrology?
Wired Science: Video: The Biggest Medical Scam Since Alex Chiu’s Immortality Device
Wired Science Blog: Correlations: The Third Branch of Science?
Working the Bench: Publications & Grants Don’t Matter – Just Pedigree
XKCD: Unscientific
XKCD: Height
XKCD: Scientific Fields arranged by Purity
Zimblog: The gender gap in math has disappeared

The Open Laboratory 2008 – you have 34 hours left!

It’s time! We are closing the submission form on December 1st at midnight Eastern time! That is just 34 hours away!
As expected, the entries have been flying in by the bushel over the past few days – it’s hard to keep up with you all and add all the new entries to the list. But, keep them coming! Is there a topic, format or style that is grievously under-represented? This is your last chance to provide the balance. We definitely need more original poems and cartoons.
Only submissions received through this form are valid. Do not add entries into the comments – this will not work!
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. at midnight EST – just 34 hours to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the sidebar of this blog and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button. Or click here.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – two and half days to go!

It’s time! We are closing the submission form on December 1st at midnight Eastern time!
As expected, the entries have been flying in over the past few days. Keep them coming! You have only 3 or so days left to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Only submissions received through this form are valid.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. at midnight EST – just 2.5 days to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the sidebar of this blog and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button. Or click here.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – three days left!

As expected, the entries have been flying in over the past few days. Keep them coming! You have only 3 or so days left to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Only submissions received through this form are valid.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. at midnight EST – just three+ days to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the bottom of this post (or to the sidebar of this blog) and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button. Or click here.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – less than a week left!

You have only 6 days left to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Only submissions received through this form are valid.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. at midnight EST – just six days to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the bottom of this post (or to the sidebar of this blog) and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button. Or click here.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – in the final stretch!

We are in the final stretch! The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, and many more over the past couple of weeks, so, if you have not done it yet, it is high time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Only submissions received through this form are valid.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. – just two weeks to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the bottom of this post (or to the sidebar of this blog) and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button. Or click here.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – two weeks till the deadline!

We are in the final strecth! The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, and many more over the past couple of weeks, so, if you have not done it yet, it is high time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Only submissions received through this form are valid.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. – just two weeks to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the bottom of this post (or to the sidebar of this blog) and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button. Or click here.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – only half a month remains!

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. – just half a month to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary).
Posting URLs in the comments does not work. Go down to the bottom of this post (or to the sidebar of this blog) and click on the “Submit to OpenLab2008″ button.

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – three weeks till the deadline!

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. – just three weeks to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2008 – just one month left for your entries!

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008. – just one month to go!
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – submissions so far

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008.
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):

Continue reading

The Open Laboratory 2008 – submissions so far

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008.
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):
==================================

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2008 – submissions so far

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008.
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):
==================================

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2008 – submissions so far

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008.
One suggestion – check the blog carnivals. This is, after all, a place where people send in their best posts. Many carnival participants are relatively new bloggers and may not know about the anthology, or feel they are too new to be worthy, or feel shy to submit their own work, so you do it for them! Here are some science-related carnival – check their archives and look for book-worthy gems in this year’s editions:
Tangled Bank
Scientiae
Praxis
The Giant’s Shoulders
Grand Rounds
Skeptics’ Circle
Carnival of the Blue
Carnival of the Green
Cabinet of Curiosities
Linnaeus’ Legacy
Circus of the Spineless
I And The Bird
Berry Go Round
Festival of the Trees
Encephalon
Molecular and Cell Biology Carnival
Oekologie
Change of Shift
Bio::Blogs
Philosophia Naturalis
Four Stone Hearth
The Accretionary Wedge
Boneyard
Mendel’s Garden
Gene Genie
Cancer research blog carnival
Carnival of Space
Carnival of Mathematics
Hourglass
Medicine 2.0 Blog Carnival
Friday Ark
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it at the new place if necessary):

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2008 – submissions so far

We are busy preparing for The Open Laboratory 2008. The submissions have been trickling in all year, and a little bit more frequently recently, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008.
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2008 – submissions so far

The Open Laboratory 2008 is in the works. The submissions have been trickling in all year, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
As we did last year, we encourage you to also send in original poems and cartoons.
Keep in mind that the posts will be printed in a book! A post that relies heavily on links, long quotes, copyrighted pictures, movies, etc., will not translate well into print.
The deadline is December 1st, 2008.
Below are submissions so far. Check them out and get inspired. If you see that one of your posts is at an old URL and you have since moved, re-submit with the new URL (perhaps re-post it if necessary):

Continue reading

ScienceOnline’09 – Registration is Open!

scienceonline09.jpg
First, there was the First NC Science Blogging Conference. Then, there was the Second NC Science Blogging Conference. And yes, we will have the Third one – renamed ScienceOnline’09 to better reflect the scope of the meeting: this time bigger and better than ever.
ScienceOnline’09 will be held Jan. 16-18, 2009 at the Sigma Xi Center in Research Triangle Park, NC.
Please join us for this free three-day event to explore science on the Web. Our goal is to bring together scientists, bloggers, educators, students, journalists, writers, publishers, Web developers and others to discuss, demonstrate and debate online strategies and tools for promoting the public understanding of science.
The conference is organized jointly by BlogTogether, the North Carolina bloggers’ group, and WiSE @ Duke, the Women in Science and Engineering organization at Duke University, with help from Sigma Xi and other sponsors.
The people behind the organization are Anton Zuiker, Abel Pharmboy and myself, with additional generous help by Brian Russell and Paul Jones.
The conference homepage/wiki is now live! Go and explore!
Registration is free and it is now open – go and Register right now!
See who has already registered.
Help us develop the Program.
Perhaps your organization/company would like to be a sponsor? Or you’d like to volunteer?
Just like last two times, we are preparing the publication of the Science Blogging Anthology and, this time, we’ll try to really have it ready and up for sale at the conference itself. This year’s Guest Editor is Jennifer Rohn and you should really start submitting your entries now.
For news and updates about the conference (and anthology), follow the ScienceOnline09 blog or check here, my SO’09 category.
Hope to see many of you in January!

Submit your entries for the third Science Blogging Anthology

Two years ago, when we all got together and did this, the result was this.
Last year, when even more of us got together and did this, the result was this.
Now, with the new editor, we are ready to do this again!
The Open Laboratory 2008 is in the works. The submissions have been trickling in all year, but it is time now to dig through your Archives for your best posts since December 20th 2007 and submit them. Submit one, or two, or several – no problem. Or ask your readers to submit for you.
Then take a look at your favourite bloggers and pick some of their best posts – don’t worry, we can deal with duplicate entries. Do not forget new and up-coming blogs – they may not know about the anthology – and submit their stuff as well.
And help us spread the word by embedding these buttons on your blogs and websites – clicking on them takes you to the submission form:
<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scit.us/openlab/openlab08-submit.150.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scit.us/openlab/openlab08-submit.200.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scit.us/openlab/openlab08-submit.300.png”&gt</a&gt

Open Laboratory

Reed and I met this morning and shipped off the authors’ copies of the OpenLab 2007 to the international addresses, then packaged and addressed the US ones which I will send out on Monday.
We already got our first submission for the Open Laboratory 2008. You can get started, too – the submission form is here.

You can now start submitting entries for the Open Lab 2008

Jennifer and I are ready – you can start submitting your entries for the Open Laboratory 2008 using this automated form. We’ll have buttons/badges ready in a few days as well (or if you are idle, you can make them and help us out: the color for the year is orange-red).
What is eligible? Blog posts written by you (or a favourite blogger you read) and posted between December 21st 2007 and December 1st 2008. Bookmark the form and keep the entries coming throughout the year – whenever you read a cool science post remember to submit it.

In which we proudly announce the Editor of the Open Laboratory 2008

Yes, that time has come….Going it alone in 2006 was far too much work for one person. Reed Cartwright was the first guest editor in 2007 and this was a perfect solution. So, going on into the new year and new victories, it is now time to announce the Editor of the Open Laboratory 2008. Drumroll….
The anthology editor for this year will be Jennifer Rohn!!!
Jennifer is a post-doc in cell biology at University College London, she blogs at Mind The Gap and is the Editor of LabLit.com.
Stay tuned for more book-related news soon. The new submission form will be available very soon as well so start checking your archives for posts written since December 21st 2007.