Category Archives: Space

The Scienceblogging Weekly (July 21th, 2012)

Blog of the Week:

Life is short, but snakes are long is written by Andrew Durso who is a PhD student at Utah State University, where he studies the behavior, physiology, and ecology of toad-eating snakes. So, everything on his blog is about snakes. And every post on his blog has something about snakes that you have not known before.

 

Top 10:

Global Warming’s Terrifying New Math by Bill McKibben:

If the pictures of those towering wildfires in Colorado haven’t convinced you, or the size of your AC bill this summer, here are some hard numbers about climate change: June broke or tied 3,215 high-temperature records across the United States. That followed the warmest May on record for the Northern Hemisphere – the 327th consecutive month in which the temperature of the entire globe exceeded the 20th-century average, the odds of which occurring by simple chance were 3.7 x 10-99, a number considerably larger than the number of stars in the universe…

The Mystery of the Missing Chromosome (With A Special Guest Appearance from Facebook Creationists) by Carl Zimmer:

There’s something fascinating about our chromosomes. We have 23 pairs. Chimpanzees and gorillas, our closest living relatives, have 24. If you come to these facts cold, you might think this represented an existential crisis for evolutionary biologists. If we do indeed descend from a common ancestor with great apes, then our ancestors must have lost a pair after our lineage branched off, some six million years ago. How on Earth could we just give up an entire chromosome….

Are Warnings About the Side Effects of Drugs Making Us Sick? by Steve Silberman

Your doctor doesn’t like what’s going on with your blood pressure. You’ve been taking medication for it, but he wants to put you on a new drug, and you’re fine with that. Then he leans in close and says in his most reassuring, man-to-man voice, “I should tell you that a small number of my patients have experienced some minor sexual dysfunction on this drug. It’s nothing to be ashamed of, and the good news is that this side effect is totally reversible. If you have any ‘issues’ in the bedroom, don’t hesitate to call, and we’ll switch you to another type of drug called an ACE inhibitor.” OK, you say, you’ll keep that in mind…..

Battling antivaccinationists at FreedomFest by Orac:

Like so many other skeptics, I just returned from TAM, which, despite all the conflict and drama surrounding it this year, actually turned out to be a highly enjoyable experience for myself and most people I talked to. As I’ve been doing the last few years, I joined up with Steve Novella and other proponents of science-based medicine to do a workshop about how difficult it is to find decent health information on the Internet, and how the “University of Google” all too frequently puts quackery on the same level as reliable sources of medical information because all that matters for most search engines when it comes to ranking search results is the number and kinds of sites that link to a given site…..

Epic fraud: How to succeed in science (without doing any) by John Timmer:

Running scientific experiments is, frankly, a pain in the ass. Sure, it’s incredibly satisfying when days or weeks of hard work produce a clean-looking result that’s easy to interpret. But often as not, experiments simply fail for no obvious reason. Even when they work, the results often leave you scratching your head, wondering “what in the world is that supposed to tell me?” The simplest solution to these problems is obvious: don’t do experiments….

One Molecule for Love, Morality, and Prosperity? by Ed Yong:

Imagine a molecule that underlies the virtues that glue societies together. Imagine that it brought out the better angels of our nature with just a sniff and could “rebond our troubled world.” Imagine that it was the “source of love and prosperity” and explained “what makes us good and evil.” Well, carry on imagining. This is a story about oxytocin, and oxytocin is not that molecule….

How We Changed Penguins Just by Watching by Elizabeth Preston:

If a penguin falls in the forest and no one is there to hear it, I don’t know what kind of forest that is—but everyone who’s interested in penguins is probably hanging out a lot closer to the South Pole. The charismatic birds let scientists and tourists alike get a close look without too much trouble. And all that familiarity has the potential to change penguins, and other closely watched animals, for good….

What Would Happen If a Lion Fought a Tiger? by Natalie Wolchover:

This ultimate cat fight has happened more times than you might expect. The Romans pitted African lions against Asian tigers in the Coliseum, to the rip-roaring pleasure of the Plebeians. A few fights were also staged in the early decades of the 20th century, and on several modern occasions, accidental cross-species encounters at zoos have quickly developed into gruesome scenes guaranteed to scar any nearby schoolchildren for life. But how do these lion versus tiger showdowns go down?…

In Search of Grote Reber by Matthew Francis:

Unlike most sites where the business of cosmology is done, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory—known colloquially as Fermilab—isn’t in a remote spot. The facility is in Batavia, Illinois, part of the sprawling metroplex of Chicago, and it’s just a short drive from two major tollways. The Standard Model describes a plethora of particles, but it has nothing on the number of fast-food joints and auto shops within ten minutes’ drive of the Fermilab gates. My friend hosting me during my stay in Illinois wasn’t even aware of the lab’s location, despite having friends living close by—the area around it is that dense…

Dancing in digital immortality: The evolution of Merce Cunningham’s “Loops” by Ashley Taylor:

The modern dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham died in 2009, and his company gave its final performance at the end of last year. Many of his dances will live on in the memories of former company members who go on to restage them. But there’s one solo, “Loops,” that Cunningham never taught to another dancer. This piece lives on through a different medium: digital motion capture…

 

Special topic: Science of Superheros

Batman and Gotham: A Deeply Dysfunctional Love Story by Adam Rogers

The horrifying physiological and psychological consequences of being Aquaman by Southern Fried Scientist

Dear Science, leave Aquaman alone! by AmasianV

Why Aquaman is the best damn superhero in comic history by Cyriaque Lamar

Physics Shows Batman’s Cape Is Suicide Machine by Liat Clark

The Fall and Rise of the Dark Knight-the Difficulties of Batman’s Life While He Exists by E. Paul Zehr

Science sways superheroes by Alan Boyle

 

Best Images:

The Goddamned Particle by Perrin Ireland

Your Skeleton – on the Internet by Daniel Lende

Animals With Misleading Names by Rosemary Mosco

The Bizarre, Breathtaking Science Photos of Fritz Goro by Tanya Lewis

American World War II Plague Posters by Michelle Ziegler

Beautiful biodiversity illustrations by Becca Stadtlander

 

Best Videos:

Friday Science Cinema by Justine E. Hausheer

When astronomers get video cameras…… by Niall

NSF Rhode Island Video Boot Camp participant Dr. Sunshine Menezes delivers her message. by NSFMessengers

Tagging Giants: Studying Whale Sharks in Cendrawasih Bay by Mark Erdmann

Variety is the Spice of Lice by TheFieldMuseum

Five Men Agree To Stand Directly Under An Exploding Nuclear Bomb by Robert Krulwich

Chuck Norris, tapeworms, and the future of science: video of my keynote talk by Carl Zimmer

 

Science:

Patients, Prisoners, and Mass Shootings — A Timeline by David Dobbs

Gorilla Youngsters Seen Dismantling Poachers’ Traps—A First by Ker Than

Life on the Leg of a Crab by Craig McClain

Can you Shoot an Arrow Backwards – into Space? by David Dilworth

How to “downplay the achievements of science” by Eoin Lettice

Why Facial Disfigurements Creep Us Out by Joseph Bennington-Castro

Wisconsin’s Sand Rush by Kate Prengaman

A Way to Trap Carbon Deep in the Ocean and City Officials Declare War on Lawn Gardens by Rachel Nuwer

From Living Room to Lily Pad: Is the Fatal Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Spread via Pet Frogs? by Sarah Fecht

Just good friends? Attraction to opposite-sex friends is common but burdensome by Christian Jarrett

Just My Luck (or is it?) by David Nussbaum

The Bra Is 500 Years Older Than We Thought and 400 Years Worth of Water Discovered in Sub-Saharan Namibia by Colin Schultz

Learning from the Tubeworm by Michelle Nijhuis

The Real Life of Pi by Noby Leong

How would you like to sleep with the fishes? by aranyak

‘Get Over It’: Climate Change Is Happening by Eric Roston

Recycling the Seasons by Erin Gettler

Fusing chromosomes by John Hawks

No sweet outcome for PhD worker bees by Elizabeth Gibney

Q&A With Mariette DiChristina: Born a Scientist by Jeanne Garbarino

Lion’s Mane Jellyfish Image: This Is (Literally) How Things Blow Up On The Internet! by Anthony Wing Kosner

The Endless Summer by Mark Bittman

Performance enhancement: Superhuman athletes by Helen Thompson

Discovery of ‘God particle’ has UNC roots by Samuel Mason

Just the facts ain’t enough, ma’am by Wilson da Silva

Artificial Volcanoes Aren’t the Solution to Warming by Erik Klemetti

Dolphins May Be Math Geniuses by Jennifer Viegas

New Science Emboldens Long Shot Bid for Dolphin, Whale Rights by Brandon Keim

What it’s Like to Witness a Grunion Run by Jason Goldman

Everything Is a Remix: The Sound of Horses Racing on TV Is Actually a Sample of Buffaloes Charging and Exploding Chocolate, Poisoned Scuba Suits, and the Bulgarian Umbrella: A Survey of Strange Assassination Tech by Alexis Madrigal

Secrets of the clam tongue: a case study in opportunistic science outreach and New nightmare fuel: the giant scaleworm Eulagisca by Miriam Goldstein

Pardon me–is this stool taken? by Bug Girl

10 species named after famous people by Bethan Jinkinson

Pancakes, served with a side of science by Aatish Bhatia

One fish, two fish and 400,000 zebrafish by Kathleen Raven

The Dirty Dozen: A wish list for psychology and cognitive neuroscience by Chris Chambers

Brain Scanning… Or Vein Scanning? by Neuroskeptic

What was the oldest Olympic sport? by Greg Laden

Dr Hornstein hasn’t gone the way of the dinosaur by Lucy Hornstein

Science Metaphors (cont.): Sub-Grid Physics by Ann Finkbeiner

Will we ever run the 100 metres in 9 seconds? by Ed Yong

Dinosaur Aunts, Bacterial Stowaways, & Insect Milk by Katie Hinde

Geneticists Evolve Fruit Flies With the Ability to Count by Liat Clark

Scientists take a bird’s eye view to prevent bird-aircraft collisions by Allie Wilkinson

Technique gets clear images from light reflected off blank paper by Matthew Francis

Vitamin D gets frequent testing, but the results are a bit quizzical by Jessica M. Morrison

How Placebo’s Evil Twin Makes You Sicker by Elizabeth Preston

Galápagos Monday: When Conservation Means Killing by Virginia Hughes

‘Canopy Meg’ wants you to care about the rainforest by Samantha Larson

Person With Autism Manages To Do Something by Zoe

Using zombies to teach science by Tara C. Smith

Ecomorphs Converge On Suites Of Correlated Traits by Yoel Stuart

Is Society Becoming Over-Medicalized? Interview with Executive Editor of Reuters Health, Dr. Ivan Oransky by Shiv Gaglani

How land-inefficient is organic agriculture? by Mark Lynas

Record Heat Wave Pushes U.S. Belief in Climate Change to 70% by Mark Drajem

 

Media, Publishing, Technology and Society:

That plan to archive every tweet in the Library of Congress? Definitely still happening by Andrew Phelps

More on the Library of Congress and Twitter by Dave Winer (also see my Science Blogs – definition, and a history)

v1 by Rethink Digg

Example Visualizations using the PLoS Search and ALM APIs and More fun with Visualizations by Martin Fenner

ScienceWriters2012: The NC Scouting Report by Rosalind Reid

Could the iPad save magazines? by Molly Mirhashem

The techies in journalism are not the problem by Anna Tarkov

Readership of papers vs. blog posts by Jeremy Fox

Why Flip The Classroom When We Can Make It Do Cartwheels? by Cathy N. Davidson

Higgs this, boson that by Richard Panek

Beginner Blogging – The Prequel by Renee Dobbs

Power to the People (When it Comes to Funding Research) by Aurélie Coulon

Curation techniques, types and tips by Steve Buttry

No Internet For One Year: Tech Writer Tries Life Offline by Joanna Stern

Why Dave Winer Invented the Blog and How blogging came to be by Dave Winer

Introducing #smarttakes: pop-up aggregation from the Guardian by Ruth Spencer

‘False Balance’ in Some Coverage of Carolina Sea-Level Controversy by Sara Peach

Brought to book: Academic journals face a radical shake-up by The Economist

All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing by Frederick Southwick

Let journalists do their jobs by David Wescott

How Academics Face the World: A Study of 5829 Homepage Pictures by Owen Churches, Rebecca Callahan, Dana Michalski, Nicola Brewer, Emma Turner, Hannah Amy Diane Keage, Nicole Annette Thomas and Mike Elmo Richard Nicholls

MIT Economist: Here’s How Copyright Laws Impoverish Wikipedia by Robinson Meyer

Why ‘future of journalism’ confabs fail by Alan D. Mutter

Why paywall journalism is changing how journalists write by Tim Burrowes

ProPublica gets $1.9 million from Knight to expand its efforts in data journalism by Adrienne LaFrance

The trouble with content by Jeff Jarvis

The Scholar’s Frenemy by PHLane

Dealing with Edits and Comments by hurleybirds

Don’t Have Time to Tweet-bollocks! Twitter can even save you time as a scientist. by Scott Wagers

Communicating science in the age of the internet by Deevy Bishop

Laptops in Lecture? by Rhett Allain

What was the first science blog? by Paul Raeburn

Scientific particles collide with social media to benefit of all by Marie Boran

On science blogs this week: Scandal by Tabitha M. Powledge

Standing on the Shoulders of Bloggers: Carnival frustration searing my soul. by Thony Christie

The Rise of Open Science by Roger Câmara

The Web Is Not the Internet (You’re Probably Getting That Wrong) by Abraham_Riesman

Delete the Save Button by Farhad Manjoo

How Reddit Became the Internet’s Vigilante Voltron by Wylie Overstreet

 

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Blogs of the Week so far:

May 11, 2012: Academic Panhandling
May 18, 2012: Anole Annals
May 25th, 2012: Better Posters
June 1st, 2012: Vintage Space
June 8th, 2012: Tanya Khovanova’s Math Blog
June 15th, 2012: Russlings
June 22nd, 2012: Parasite of the Day
June 29th, 2012: March of the Fossil Penguins
July 6th, 2012: Musings of a Dinosaur
July 13th, 2012: Contagions

The Scienceblogging Weekly (July 13th, 2012)

Blog of the Week:

Contagions is a blog written by Michelle Ziegler (Twitter, Facebook, the other two blogs by Michelle – Heavenfield and Selah – are focused entirely on history and not on medicine or science). In Contagions, Michelle explores infectious disease – there is a lot about the Plague – from history to epidemiology to most recent scientific papers. Sometimes gruesome, always fascinating.

 

Top 10:

Is Autism an “Epidemic” or Are We Just Noticing More People Who Have It? by Emily Willingham:

In March the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) the newly measured autism prevalences for 8-year-olds in the United States, and headlines roared about a “1 in 88 autism epidemic.” The fear-mongering has led some enterprising folk to latch onto our nation’s growing chemophobia and link the rise in autism to “toxins” or other alleged insults, and some to sell their research, books, and “cures.” On the other hand, some researchers say that what we’re really seeing is likely the upshot of more awareness about autism and ever-shifting diagnostic categories and criteria….

New technique identifies magnetic cells in animals by watching them spin by Ed Yong:

A migrating robin can keep a straight course even when it flies through a cloudy night sky, devoid of obvious landmarks. That’s because it can sense the Earth’s magnetic field. Something in its body acts as a living compass, giving it a sense of direction and position. This ability – known as magnetoreception – isn’t unique to robins. It’s been found in many other birds, sharks and rays, salmon and trout, turtles, bats, ants and bees, and possibly cows, deer and foxes. But despite more than 50 years of research, the details of the magnetic sense are still elusive….

The Sex Scholar by Kara Platoni:

Decades before Kinsey, Stanford professor Clelia Mosher polled Victorian-era women on their bedroom behavior—then kept the startling results under wraps….

Bloggers and Bowerbirds by Erin Kissane:

There are still a lot of elbows being thrown in the squabble about “creation” versus “curation,” and it seems to be getting worse. As humans tend to do, we’re talking past each other and pretending to simplicity in the face of the complex and the weird. Here’s what I think is going on. I think we’re getting tripped up by two things: clumsy language and a misapprehension about competition for limited resources….

Citations, Social Media & Science by Morgan D. Jackson:

This morning I was reading a newly published paper that I found intriguing, not only for its content1 but also for who it cited — sort of. Among the regular cadre of peer-reviewed journal articles supporting the author’s findings were two blog posts by University of Glasgow professor Roderic Page. Rod is a major proponent for digitizing and linking biodiversity literature with all aspects of a species’ pixel-trail across the internet, so I was excited to see his blog being “formally” recognized. As I finished reading the paper and reached the References section, I skimmed through to see how a blog citation might be formatted. Much to my dismay, after breezing through the L’s, M’s, and N’s I found myself within the R’s, with nary a Page in sight…

Investigation: Drug Resistance, Chicken And 8 Million UTIs by Maryn McKenna:

…I’ve been working with a great new group, the Food and Environment Reporting Network — one of the grant-funded journalism organizations that have arisen in the wake of the collapse of mainstream journalism — on an important, under-reported topic. Which is: Over the past decade, a group of researchers in several countries have been uncovering links between the use of antibiotics in chicken production and the rising occurrence of resistance in one of the most common bacterial infections in the world. The infection in question is UTI, which just about every woman I know will recognize: It stands for urinary tract infection, and on average one out of every 9 women in the United States suffers one at least once per year. There are 6 million to 8 million UTIs in the US each year, costing at least $1 billion in healthcare spending….

The hows and whys of human attraction by Barbara J. King:

Robin Dunbar may not be a household name, but some of his thinking has reached the status of household ideas. You’ve heard that 150 is an approximate upper limit on the number of our family-and-friend relationships because that’s how many connections we can track? That’s Dunbar. You’ve read the theory that language evolved as a sort of replacement for hands-on grooming among our primate relatives when group size got big? That’s Dunbar too. Now, in The Science of Love and Betrayal, Dunbar, who is Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology at Oxford, asks seductive questions about love and friendship. Why do men and women pair-bond when so many other animals don’t? How do biology and sociality intersect in explaining human attraction to others? …

Crimes and Misdemeanors: Reforming Social Psychology by Dave Nussbaum:

The recent news of Dirk Smeesters’ resignation is certainly not good news for social psychology, particularly so soon after the Diedrik Stapel case, but I believe it can serve as an opportunity for the field to take important steps towards reform. The reforms that are needed the most, however, are not restricted to preventing or detecting the few instances of fraud by unscrupulous researchers who are intentionally falsifying data. What we should be more concerned about are the far less egregious, but much more common offenses that many of us commit, often unknowingly or unintentionally, and almost never with fraudulent intent….

The Vampire of Venice Returns, or What Is that Brick Doing in that Skull’s Mouth? by Kristina Killgrove:

It seems like every spring there is renewed coverage of a partial skeleton that was found on the island of Lazaretto Nuovo (one of two 15th-16th century leper colonies near Venice) in 2009. I’ve never covered it here, but since I was alerted to an airing of a documentary about the skeleton on Italian TV this week, I thought it may be time to track the progress of the so-called Vampire of Venice (“il vampiro di Venezia” in Italian, and not to be confused with a similarly named Dr. Who episode)….

How the Deaf Brain Rewires Itself to ‘Hear’ Touch and Sight by Nadja Popovich:

Our experiences help shape our brains. So it might make sense that for a person born without hearing, the part of the brain that’s meant to process audio would be underdeveloped. But according to a new study, those who have been deaf since birth actually use the sound-related part of the brain — known as the primary auditory cortex — to do even more heavy lifting than their hearing counterparts. …

 

Special topic 1: #arseniclife:

The Case (Study) of Arsenic Life: How the Internet Can Make Science Better by Rebecca J. Rosen

Live-blogging Arsenic Life by Carl Zimmer

Discovery of an arsenic-friendly microbe refuted and Q and A: Critical ‘Arseniclife’ studies released by Dan Vergano

Pair Of Studies Rebuts Arsenic-Based Life by Carmen Drahl

Arsenic Death by ChemBark

“Arsenic bacteria”: Coffin, meet nails by Ashutosh Jogalekar

Arsenic Life, Cold Fusion, and the Allure of Wishful Thinking by Matthew Francis

Another chink in the Ingelfinger armor? Arsenic life talk forces Science to release paper early, without embargo and Science has “not asked for a correction or retraction” of arsenic life paper, and why situation is unlike XMRV-CFS by Ivan Oransky

Arsenic-Life Discovery Debunked—But “Alien” Organism Still Odd by Richard A. Lovett

Consider the publication embargo… and NASA’s cowardly responses to their #arseniclife FAIL by Rosie Redfield

New research points toward “no” on arsenic life by Phil Plait

Annoying Arsenic Claim Debunked for Good – We Hope. by Faye Flam

Notorious Arsenic-Tolerant Bacterium Needs Phosphorus After All by Quirin Schiermeier

Despite refutation, Science arsenic life paper deserves retraction, scientist argues by David Sanders

Two studies show ‘weird life’ microbe can’t live on arsenic by Alan Boyle

Latest on #ArsenicLife by Jonathan Eisen

Journal retreats from controversial arsenic paper by Marc Kaufman

New Science Papers Prove NASA Failed Big Time In Promoting Supposedly Earth-Shaking Discovery That Wasn’t by Matthew Herper

 

Special topic 2: glut of PhDs:

WaPo: Not enough jobs for science PhDs by David Kroll

The STEM PhD Glut Makes the Mainstream Media by Mike the Mad Biologist

Subtleties of the Crappy Job Market for Scientists by Julianne Dalcanton

The wages of a life science Ph.D. (not high!) and More on jobs & Ph.D.s by Razib Khan

“Alternate careers” is just the next exploitation strategy? by DrugMonkey

Too many scientists? by Puff the Mutant Dragon

Washington Post: “U.S. pushes for more scientists, but the jobs aren’t there.” by Chemjobber

Life as PhD student by Elf Eldridge

 

Best Images:

TICKS ON A SNAKE by teresa.frog.applause

On Writing by Abstruse Goose

Here’s Something You Don’t See Every Day by Jonathan Losos

Arctic Biologist Shares Astonishing Sea Creatures With the World by Pete Brook

Visual Field by xkcd

 

Best Videos:

Nobel laureate occasionally hangs out on street corners, answering physics questions by Maggie Koerth-Baker

Snake Stunt: Drinking While Dangling by Andrew C. Revkin

Talent Search » TED@Vancouver » Carin Bondar: Reproduction and survival in the animal kingdom

Talent Search » TED@Sydney » James Byrne: How plants have sex

Stomach Bacteria Show Early Human Travels by skepTV

Piecing together Patagonia’s ancient vegetation by Melanie Connor

Opening Keynote from Cameron Neylon – Network Enabled Research by Open Repositories 2012

‘Big Ass Shark’ Unexpectedly Swipes Fish Off Girl’s Line Like Something Out of a Movie by Neetzan Zimmerman

The Higgs Boson, Part II: What is Mass? by MinutePhysics

Alan Turing: His Mind, His Life (VIDEO, Part Two) by Cara Santa Maria

This is What Snake Venom Does to Blood! by fragrancemad

Is Apollo 18 Real? by Amy Shira Teitel

#CurlyHairMafia on the Secret of NIMH by DNLee

From Galileo to Galaxy Zoo: Astronomy in the Digital Age by Alessandro Mangiafico

 

Science:

No, the web is not driving us mad and Why I am always unlucky but you are always careless by Vaughan Bell

Where are the Canadian media in analysing the Death of Evidence protest? by Marie-Claire Shanahan

The Dead Sea is Dying: Can
A Controversial Plan Save It?
by Dave Levitan

Trajectory of a falling Batman by Ben Goldacre

The mundaneness of science by Christie Aschwanden

Brain Scans Predict When Poker Players Will Bluff and Why Successful Leaders Share Their Harems by Elizabeth Preston

Egg-eating snakes and This blog is supposed to be about snakes, but if you can’t make exceptions for family, then you’re a jerk by Andrew Durso

Doubt Is Good for Science, But Bad for PR by Stuart Firestein

When you throb with pain…are you feeling the beat? by scicurious

Little fellah bums by Michael Wellan

Silk cages preserve vaccines and antibiotics for months without refrigeration and Urban noise can turn sparrow females into bad mums and Chicken vaccines merged to form live viruses and caused outbreaks of irony and Uncertainty shrouds psychologist’s resignation by Ed Yong

South Carolina Governor Nikki Haley slashes funding for coastal science and sustainable development by David Shiffman

Daily Mail, HuffPo Dumb Down Dinosex by Brian Switek

Q&A With Deborah Berebichez: Seeing the World Through Physics Glasses by Double Xpression

Mathematics and HIV by Jessica Wapner

Thai Farmers Fight ‘Global Warming Fines’ by Prangtip Daorueng

Why Crowds Can Turn Deadly by Emily Badger

You can hide those lying eyes by Zen Faulkes

You can’t ban redheaded sperm by David Winter

Zombies and Volleyball: The Benefits of the Bystander Effect by Melanie Tannenbaum

Q: Why Do We Wear Pants? A: Horses by Alexis Madrigal

There is something and not nothing by Roger Ebert

Want to Get Teens Interested in Math and Science? Target Their Parents by Anna Mikulak

Scientific History and the Lessons for Today’s Emerging Ideas by The Physics arXiv Blog

A striking experiment shows how you can run on quicksand and Black hole shines a light on dark galaxies by Matthew Francis

Why Canada’s scientists need our support by Alice Bell

Why Eugenics Will Always Fail by Esther Inglis-Arkell

Gnathia marleyi — or not by Susan Perkins

Will We Ever Find All the Dinosaurs? by Brian Switek

Should we all be guinea pigs? by John Rennie

Pipes, Reins, & the Cerebral Winepress: Mechanical Metaphor in Vesalius’ Fabrica by Marri Lynn

The climate of the climate change debate is changing by Myles Allen

Lizards Can’t Take The Heat – But Can They Take The Cold? by Martha Munoz

Crackpots, geniuses, and how to tell the difference by Maggie Koerth-Baker

Relativistic Baseball: What would happen if you tried to hit a baseball pitched at 90% the speed of light? by xkcd

I saw the (negative) sign: Problems with fMRI research by Dana Smith

Nikola Tesla and the magic of science by Danica Radovanovic

Why George Will Is Wrong About Weather And Climate by Jocelyn Fong

If “Fifty Shades of Grey” Had Been Written by a Biology Textbook Author by Ricki Lewis

Keeping Parkinson’s Disease a Secret by Kate Yandell

Distrusting Scientific Research by Kelsey Tsipis

Weird Fiction Monday: Mass Effect: Apocalypse by Greg Gbur

Could the S.H.I.E.L.D. Helicarrier Fly? by Rhett Allain

Planet of the Mega Disasters by Faye Flam

Dr. Drew Cashes In by Charles Seife

Galápagos Monday: The Sad Sex Life of Lonesome George by Virginia Hughes

Crowdfunding Questions With Petridish.org Co-founder Matt Salzberg by Travis Saunders

Roid Age: steroids in sport and the paradox of pharmacological puritanism by Greg Downey

Traditional Sexual Values Challenged in Classic Animal Study by Brandon Keim

Painless Injections by Tianyou Xu

Down, boy! The politics of humping by jwoestendiek

Notes on Some of Those 79 “New” Shark Species by Chuck Bangley

What’s the difference between “Opossum” and “Possum”? by Jason Bittel

A Brief History of Money by James Surowiecki

Tree Rings and Climate: Some Recent Developments by Michael E. Mann, Gavin Schmidt, and Eric Steig

The American Heat Wave and Global Warming by MarkCC

Brain Time by David Eagleman

Increase in wildfire frequency and severity – is it real? by Kelly Ramirez

 

Media, Publishing, Technology and Society:

If Mitt Romney were running a “post-truth” campaign, would the political press report it? by Jay Rosen

Chronicling Mitt’s Mendacity, Vol. XXV by Steve Benen

SPARC Europe’s response to the inaccuracies in the article by the Daily Mail’s City Editor on 18 June by Alma Swan

Wheeler: Spoken word, handwritten letters make lasting impressions by Burgetta Wheeler

The Blogfather on science blogging by NASW

Twitter and the Arab Spring: New Evidence by Henry Farrell

Predatory Open-Access Journals? by Sarah Hird

Academic blogging: minority scholars cannot afford to be silent by Denise Horn

Should Applied Funding Go To Academia Or Startups? by Elizabeth Iorns

The Importance of Open Access: An Interview with Patient Advocate Graham Steel by PatientsLikeMe

Are you sure that’s true? Truth Goggles tackles fishy claims at the moment of consumption by Andrew Phelps

The Dreamers’ dreams: young immigrants tell their stories by Ruth Spencer

Retraction tracking by Zen Faulkes

J-school grads turn to startup scene by Anne Field

Thoughts on the Finch Report, part 1 and Part 2 by Mike Taylor

A history of science blogging and Reflections on 10 years in science blogging by Razib Khan

A History of Science Blogging and Communicating Science to Society by Larry Moran

Bora’s Science Blogging Post by Eva Amsen

Video Tip of the Week: ScienceSeeker for science blogging by Mary Mangan

Sharpening ideas: From topic to story by Dan Ferber

Challenging ‘He Said, She Said’ Journalism by Linda Greenhouse

Are we stuck in filter bubbles? Here are five potential paths out by Jonathan Stray

Alan Alda warms up science communication with the Flame Challenge and The Flame Challenge winners, and other attempts to get science communication out of its rut by Peter Linett

Darpa Wants You to Be Its Hackathon Guinea Pig by Arikia Milikan

Science journalism through the looking glass by Chris Chambers and Petroc Sumner

How the byline beast was born by Jack Shafer

The left’s gone left but the right’s gone nuts: Asymmetrical polarization in action by David Roberts

Confessions of an Internet Addict by Alexis Madrigal

Science, Blogging and Plagiarism by Michael McBurney

How future-safe was the first Harvard blogging site? by Dave Winer

Why Blogs Fail by Neuroskeptic

Takes Two to Tango by Karen McLeod

How to live-tweet from an event by Tia Fisher

Is Open Access a Moral or a Business Issue? A Conversation with The Pennsylvania State University Press by Prof. Hacker

Reflections on Games For Change by Eric Martin

All’s Not Fair in Science and Publishing by Frederick Southwick

The ultimate geek road trip: North Carolina’s mega data center cluster by Katie Fehrenbacher and 10 reasons Apple, Facebook & Google chose North Carolina for their mega data centers and The controversial world of clean power and data centers and The story behind how Apple’s iCloud data center got built and That’s a wrap: The 4-part series on North Carolina’s mega data centers

What should society journals do about open access? and What does it cost to publish a paper with Elsevier? by Mike Taylor

The Blob versus the blog: arguing how social media is changing science and Transformative idea for peer review: reviewing & grading the reviewers by Paul Knoepfler

Three Keys to Clearing Two Social Media Hurdles by Farris Timimi

How the iPad helps scientists do their jobs by Joel Mathis

Reforming Copyright Is Possible by Pamela Samuelson

Piecemeal existence: For today’s young freelancers, what will traffic bear? by Ben Adler

The significance of plot without conflict by Still Eating Oranges

The Scienceblogging Weekly (July 6th, 2012)

Blog of the Week:

Musings of a Dinosaur is a blog written by a physician, family practitioner, Lucy E. Hornstein, author of the book Declarations of a Dinosaur: 10 Laws I’ve Learned as a Family Doctor. Having a small general family practice is different from beeing a specialist in a large hospital. Approach to patients is different. The way one runs the business is different. The thoughts about electronic medical records (a frequent topic of the blog) are different. A valuable perspective, wry and funny and insightful.

 

Top 10:

Maxwell’s demon goes quantum, can do work, write and erase data by Matthew Francis:

At any temperature above absolute zero, particles in a system move randomly, an effect known as thermal fluctuation. The random character of the fluctuations means they cannot be put to work in a mechanical sense (the measure of the energy unavailable for work is called entropy). 19th century physicist James Clerk Maxwell proposed a tiny intelligent “demon” that could harvest the thermal fluctuations to restore their usefulness; later work in the 20th century showed that the demon itself would have entropy, which would keep the thermodynamic books balanced.

Interesting by Shara Yurkiewicz:

I pull up a test result for my patient, and the senior resident standing behind me lets out an excited squeal. “I’ve never seen the imaging come back positive for this,” she says. Our two-week-old infant, who already has a rare infection, also has a rare associated structural abnormality. It’s not benign, but it is fixable. The fix usually requires surgery. As we walk over to the patient’s room to update her mother, my senior gushes about the zebra that was uncovered on the ultrasound. She asks me if I’m excited. “I dunno,” I mutter, which is somewhat more diplomatic than my disgust that she is. ”Her kid has to get surgery now.”

The world’s smallest fly probably decapitates really tiny ants by Ed Yong:

…Even though flies as a group aren’t exactly giants, the new species was around half the size of the previous smallest species. Brown named it Euryplatea nanaknihali after Nanak Nihal Weiss, a young boy from Brown’s home town in Los Angeles. Weiss is an entomology fanatic and Brown hopes that the name will help to keep his interest for years to come….

Creationists and Climate “Skeptics” – Separate Species or Just Different Breeds? by Faye Flam:

Several of the regular readers of this column have told me that since I’ve been brave enough to tell the truth about evolution, I should do the same for climate change and expose it as a hoax. In one case I replied that in my stories I always strive to reflect the truth to the best of my abilities. He wrote that he was “disappointed.” These evolution-accepting climate change “skeptics” are an interesting breed, revealing some key differences in the ways they and creationists approach science. Self-described climate skeptics are much more scattered in their views than are creationists, but they are better organized and together speak with a louder, and angrier voice….

Printing dinosaurs: the mad science of new paleontology by Laura June:

In April of this year, I headed out to a marl pit in Clayton, New Jersey to watch a team of Drexel University students and their teacher, Professor Kenneth Lacovara, dig for fossils. Marl, a lime-rich mud, had been mined and used as the 19th century’s leading fertilizer, but since around World War II (with the development of more advanced, synthetic fertilizers), demand for it has steeply lessened, and there aren’t many marl mining businesses left in the US. The marl pits of Southern New Jersey are famous for something else, though: they have been incredibly rich in fossil finds. In February, Dr. Lacovara had announced that the Paleontology department at Drexel would team up with the Engineering department for what would largely be a novel new project: scanning all of the fossils in the University’s collection (including some previously unidentified dinosaurs of Lacovara’s own finds in other parts of the world) using a 3D scanner. The Engineering department would then take those scans and use a 3D printer to create 1/10 scale models of the most important bones. But, he reported, that wouldn’t be the end of it: they intended, he said, to use those scale polymer “printouts” to model and then engineer fully working limbs, complete with musculature — to create, in effect, a fully accurate robotic dinosaur leg or arm, and eventually, a complete dinosaur….

Childbirth and C-sections in pre-modern times by Kristina Killgrove:

Basically since we started walking upright, childbirth has been difficult for women. Evolution selected for larger and larger brains in our hominin ancestors such that today our newborns have heads roughly 102% the size of the mother’s pelvic inlet width (Rosenberg 1992). Yes, you read that right. Our babies’ heads are actually two percent larger than our skeletal anatomy…

Self help: forget positive thinking, try positive action by Richard Wiseman:

For years self-help gurus have preached the same simple mantra: if you want to improve your life then you need to change how you think. Force yourself to have positive thoughts and you will become happier. Visualise your dream self and you will enjoy increased success. Think like a millionaire and you will magically grow rich. In principle, this idea sounds perfectly reasonable. However, in practice it often proves ineffective….

The Uncertainty Principle for climate (and chemical) models by Ashutosh Jogalekar:

A recent issue of Nature had an interesting article on what seems to be a wholly paradoxical feature of models used in climate science; as the models are becoming increasingly realistic, they are also becoming less accurate and predictive because of growing uncertainties. I can only imagine this to be an excruciatingly painful fact for climate modelers who seem to be facing the equivalent of the Heisenberg uncertainty principle for their field. It’s an especially worrisome time to deal with such issues since the modelers need to include their predictions in the next IPCC report on climate change which is due to be published next year….

The living rainbow: A fatal flaw in a classic study of sexual selection by Jeremy Yoder:

A key component of classical sexual selection theory is the idea that males maximize their evolutionary fitness—the number of children they ultimately have—by mating with lots of females, while females maximize their fitness by selecting only one or a few high-quality partners. It’s pretty clear that this model works well for some species (like ducks), but also that there are many it doesn’t fit so well. Now it looks like one of the “classic” experimental examples of sexual selection may actually fall into the latter category….

Dr. Google and Mr. Hyde by David Gorski:

….Like all major new technologies, the Internet has a good side and a bad side. In many cases, the same property is both good and bad, and one place that this is particularly true is in medical information. The Internet has an abundance of medical information, all there for the reading and learning, and various discussion forums that began with online BBS services and the now mostly obsolete global discussion community of Usenet allow people from all over the world who would never have communicated directly with each other before to share information and experiences. Unfortunately, there is a dark side to this. Regular readers of this blog know what that dark side is, too. The same technology that allows reputable scientists and doctors to publish reliable medical information to the world at very low cost also allows quacks and cranks to spew their misinformation, nonsense, pseudoscience, and quackery to the whole world at very little cost. And, boy, do they ever! In many ways, the quacks are a far more effective online presence than skeptics and supporters of science-based medicine. I mean, look at SBM itself. We’re still using a generic WordPress template. Now look at an antivaccine website like The International Medical Council on Vaccination or Generation Rescue or the antivaccine blog Age of Autism. Look at quack websites like NaturalNews.com The comparison, at least when it comes to web and blog design, is not flattering…..

 

Special topic: Higgs boson:

What is the Higgs boson? – video by Ian Sample and Laurence Topham

What Is the Higgs Boson? [Video] by George Musser

Higgs Boson VIDEO: A Metaphor To Explain The Particle, Or Further Confuse You by Cara Santa Maria and Henry Reich

Sonnet on a Higgs-Like Particle (video) by Vi Hart

New Particle Resembling Long-Sought Higgs Boson Uncovered at Large Hadron Collider by John Matson

If You Want More Higgs Hype, Don’t Read This Column by John Horgan

Beyond Higgs: On Supersymmetry (or Lack Thereof) by Glenn Starkman

Mr Boson, I presume…? by Charles Ebikeme

Live-Blogging the Higgs Seminar by Sean Carroll

Science Friday by Sean Carroll

Higgsteria: We Didn’t Need No U.S. Super Collider by Gary Stix

Pros and Cons of building particle accelerators – Werner Heisenberg by Beatrice Lugger

Higgs? Probably not tomorrow and Discovering a boson and Linux at CERN and The mysterious Mr. Higgs by Gianluigi Filippelli

Who gives a Higgs? by Jacqui Hayes

What If the New Particle Isn’t the Higgs Boson? by Natalie Wolchover

Why the Higgs Particle Matters by Matt Strassler

The Best Analogies Scientists and Journalists Use To Explain the Higgs Boson by J. Bryan Lowder

High on Higgs by Subhra Priyadarshini

Stop calling it “The God Particle!” by Dr. Dave Goldberg

The Higgs Boson explained by PhD Comics by Jorge Cham, via Nathan Yau

Scientists’ search for Higgs boson yields new subatomic particle by Brian Vastag and Joel Achenbach

The Higgs Boson – Certainly, certainly (?) there! (at least, I am pretty certain it is) by Julian Champkin

Gallery: how Wired readers picture the Higgs Boson by Ian Steadman

The Art of Science – Particle Accelerator Art by Michele Banks

Gettin’ Higgy With it: A Roundup of Higgs Boson Jokes on Twitter by Xeni Jardin

Higgs! by Phil Plait

Higgs Boson: the jokes edition by Khalil A. Cassimally

Scientists might have found the Higgs Boson by Maggie Koerth-Baker

Higgsdependence Day! by Matthew R. Francis

Physicists Find Elusive Particle Seen as Key to Universe by DENNIS OVERBYE

How the Discovery of the Higgs Boson Could Break Physics by Adam Mann

CERN Announces Discovery of Higgs-like Particle by PRI The World

What It Means to Find “a Higgs” by Mariette DiChristina

So What’s the Big Deal About the Higgs Boson, Anyway? A Physics Double Xplainer by Matthew Francis

A Moment for Particle Physics: The End of a 40-Year Story? by Stephen Wolfram

Higgs-like discovery from the inside by Jon Butterworth

The Higgs Boson and my mom by Laura Jane Martin

What Higgs Boson Evidence Looks Like by Ira Flatow

Higgs boson: Prof Stephen Hawking loses $100 bet by Nick Collins

Physicists Detect New Heavy Particle by Virat Markandeya

Hipster Pop Quiz: What is the Higgs Boson? by Motherboard

These Hipsters Have No Idea About the Higgs Boson by Megan Garber

CERN Finds New Particle (And it Might be the Higgs Boson!) by Miriam Kramer

Does 5-sigma = discovery? by Hyperspace

It’s true, they say they have the Higgs in the bag. Big news. Just imagine the hubbub were it deemed imaginary. and Goldarned god particle by Charlie Petit

So the Higgs boson walks into a… by Eryn Brown

Lighter side of the Higgs boson by Alan Boyle

Nobel Laureates in Physics React to the Higgs-Like Particle News [Video] by Nature magazine

Do You Understand The Higgs Boson? by Fake Science

It’s kind of a Higgs deal by Zen Faulkes

Field Day by Rheanna Sand

 

Best Images:

Snake Oil? The scientific evidence for health supplements by David McCandless and Andy Perkins

Unusual Bridges For Animals – Wildlife Overpasses by THE WORLD GEOGRAPHY

Horoscoped by David McCandless

The complete history of philosophy visualized in one graph by Simon Raper, via George Dvorsky

Paper birds – now with some internal anatomy by Diana Beltran Herrera

How Do We Know by The Census Bureau

 

Best Videos:

Curiosity’s Seven Minutes of Terror by NASA

Hermit Crab in Glass Shell turning over by Robert DuGrenier

Virtual Pigeon Attracts, Baffles Randy Males by Rachel Nuwer

Stephen Colbert Interviews Neil deGrasse Tyson at Montclair Kimberley Academy – 2010-Jan-29 by teridon

Fracking by Carin Bondar

Watch a giant African land snail enjoying a nice cool shower by Lauren Davis

Science Is A Girl Thing: Chris Hardwick, Cara Santa Maria Talk Women In STEM On G4’s ‘Attack Of The Show’ by Cara Santa Maria

Speed Comparison: GT vs. F1 cars by mclaren777

Why We Need to Broaden Participation in Science by RMCRSLDM

Science Writing in the Age of Denial, April 23, 2012 videos by University of Wisconsin-Madison

What Happens Inside the Large Hadron Collider? by George Musser and Rose Eveleth

Som Sabadell flashmob by Banco Sabadell

Octopus ‘vulgaris’ hatchlings hatching by Richard Ross

Ophiarachna Predatory Brittle Star FEEDING ACTION! by ChrisM

Deep-Sea Cephalopods Hide Using Light by AMNHorg

 

Science:

The Good-Old Days of Contraception: Lemon-Peel Diaphragms and Beaver-Testicle Tea by Sophie Bushwick

TGIPF: Iceland’s Phallological Museum by Alex Witze and Jeff Kanipe

The Myth of the Rational Scientist by Byron Jennings

Do scientists need an equivalent of the Hippocratic Oath to ensure ethical conduct? by Lou Woodley

Will We Ever Find Dinosaurs Caught in the Act? and Pterosaurs Done Wrong by Brian Switek

Trees, grass, carbon dioxide and the battle for dominance by GrrlScientist

Franz Boas and Neuroanthropology by Daniel Lende

Altmetrics and the Future of Science by Samuel Arbesman

Lunch: An Urban Invention by Nicola Twilley

The Making Of Meat-Eating America by Dan Charles

How To Start Your Own Farm by Forrest Pritchard

Foie Gras Hypocrisy by Matt Pressberg

U.N. Report from Rio on Environment a ‘Suicide Note’ by Mark McDonald

A “rule-of-forearm” for collecting data in Botswana by Andrew J King

Microbiomes mediating microevolution by Zen Faulkes

Dietary supplements: Manufacturing troubles widespread, FDA inspections show by Trine Tsouderos

Grizzlies move into Polar bear territory by Rebecca Deatsman

The Unsung Scientist, Louis-Antoine Ranvier by Cynthia McKelvey

Turning trauma into story: the benefits of journaling by Jordan Gaines

The tyranny of π: A semirational rant on an irrational number by Jonathan Chang

Draining the Desert? by Kate Prengaman

BOOK REVIEW: Companions in Wonder: Children and Adults Exploring Nature Together by Michael Barton

Ancient impact crater may be largest ever found by Stephen “DarkSyde” Andrew

Rising Heat at the Beach Threatens Largest Sea Turtles, Climate Change Models Show by Rachel Ewing

You Can See Poor From Space by Philadelinquency

Maya Lin: A Memorial to A Vanishing Natural World by Diane Toomey

The Problems With Forecasting and How to Get Better at It by Nate Silver

Ray Bradbury and the Lost Planetarium Show by David Romanowski

Opossums: Survival Machines and Opossum Reproduction by Jason Bittel

Conducting Cells in Mosses by Jessica M. Budke

What’s the difference between one kid with a fever and one without? by Connor Bamford

You want to cut me where? by Steven Salzberg

Birds of the Sun by Christopher Taylor

Coffee: a caffeinated chronicle by Jordan Gaines

Inner Ears Reveal Speed of Early Primates and The Shambulance: Ab Toning Belts (or, Muscle Tone Is All in Your Head) and Flightless Giant’s Flower Diet Revealed by Poop Fossils by Elizabeth Preston

Reviving the ‘apparently dead’ in Georgian Britain by Alun Withey

Don’t trust the religious by P.Z.Myers

Mother Nature Wants to Eat You, or: The Trouble With Alternative Med by Puff the Mutant Dragon

Galápagos Monday: World Within Itself by Virginia Hughes

Not in Our Genes by Bryan Appleyard

On the merits of science literacy by Alice Bell

Defining a hybrid species by Retrieverman

Sleep Research in the Blind May Help Us All by Steven Lockley, Ph.D.

Male Lactation- there’s probably something wrong with you by Noby Leong

Bill McKibben on the Global Warming Hoax by Bill McKibben

Why the Left-Brain Right-Brain Myth Will Probably Never Die by Christian Jarrett

Do Bears Sense That Hunters Are Afoot? and Thinking About Your Own Demise Inspires Environmentalism by Rachel Nuwer

Infrastructure and You by Marie-Claire Shanahan, Scott Huler and Tim De Chant

Bottles Full of Brain-Boosters by Carl Zimmer

New Study: Climate Deniers Are Emoting–Especially the Conspiracy Theorists and The Politics of Ice and Fire by Chris Mooney

What’s Behind The Record Heat? by Douglas Main

Jungle Science and the Future of Conservation by Mireya Mayor

A Poison for Assassins and Tiny Fireworks by Deborah Blum

“Why Do We Have to Learn This Stuff?”—A New Genetics for 21st Century Students by Rosemary J. Redfield

Darwin, Darwinism, and Uncertainty: book review by Matt Young

You’re Not as Happy as You Think You Are, Behavioral Scientists Report by Thomas Hayden

Strange sounds: How the brain makes sense of degraded speech by Julia Erb

Do We Need “Evolutionary Medicine”? by Harriet Hall

What the Germs in Your Bellybutton Say About You by Jason Tetro

Just a Reminder by Mike Haubrich

Night Shift by Rob Dunn

When Killer Whales Attack by Kieran Mulvaney

Voyager 1: The Little Spacecraft That Could by Amy Shira Teitel

Marriage is a tool society uses to reproduce by Greg Laden

Supplements: Something Smells Fishy by Cassandra Willyard

Cost of scientific research – and political naivity by Ken Perrott

The time has come: public participation in science policy making. and Harnessing Citizen Scientists: Let’s Create a Very Public Office of Technology Assessment by Darlene Cavalier

Get to know the narwhal! by Heidi Smith

Worm kills insects by vomiting Hulk-like bacteria by Ed Yong

The Tasmanian Echidna’s Four-Headed Penis by Lucy Cooke

Why Do Flamingos Stand On One Leg? by Matt Soniak

The First Poem Published in a Scientific Journal by Maria Popova

Truth and Reconciliation for Group Selection (pdf) by David Sloan Wilson

With a snail’s help a fish transitions from dying to dead by Craig McClain

Can You Learn To Be Synaesthetic? and False Positive Neuroscience? by Neuroskeptic

The Psychologist: Vladimir Nabokov’s understanding of human nature anticipated the advances in psychology since his day by Brian Boyd

 

Media, Publishing, Technology and Society:

The Geek Poet Strikes Back by Beth McNichol

A field guide to ocean science and conservation on twitter by Andrew Thaler

How to solve impossible problems: Daniel Russell’s awesome Google search techniques by John Tedesco

Should Google and Amazon be allowed to control domains? by Mathew Ingram

Calling Dr. Google by Jeff Jarvis

Belated thoughts on the Finch Report on achieving Open Access by Mike Taylor

The ‘Busy’ Trap by Tim Kreider and Have You Fallen Into The Busy Trap? by Brad Feld and Do We All Work Too Much? And Do We Really Have a Choice? by Walter Frick

The Death and Rebirth of Television News: “All of Life is Reduced to the Common Rubble of Banality” by Steven Lloyd Wilson

The Enlightenment project could inspire our media by Matthew da Silva

What Twitter could have been by Dalton Caldwell

A manifesto for the newspaper’s public editor in the social media era by Dan Gillmor

Why Google Plus isn’t dead — well, yet by John D. Sutter

SciWriteLabs 8.3: Adjudicating the Lehrer plagiarism accusations. Plus: Do Arianna and Oprah deserve lifelong bans? by Seth Mnookin

The Great American Novel by Maria Konnikova

Of Flying Cars and the Declining Rate of Profit by David Graeber (also see reactions by Henry Farrell and Cassiodorus)

Journatic worker takes ‘This American Life’ inside outsourced journalism by Anna Tarkov

Positive signs from Wiley on open access and Dear Wiley: please use Creative Commons Attribution for your open-access activities by Mike Taylor

On Tides, Visibility, and Quiet Revolutionary Acts by Dana Hunter

The View from Nowhere Interviews Trenberth by Michael Tobis

Social Networking For Scientists – The Wiki by Christie Wilcox

Save your darlings: Blank on Blank gives new life to old tape by Adrienne LaFrance

Hooray for the Awesome Wave of Lady Scientists in Action Movies by Alyssa Rosenberg

Long-form journalism project Matter aiming for September launch by Rachel McAthy

The Predictable Comment by The Digital Cuttlefish

Dramatic Growth of Open Access by Heather Morrison

The 2012 presidential election: what voters want – the community agenda by Jay Rosen and Nadja Popovich

Website Tests How Political Opposites Actually Discuss Differences by Marissa Alioto

Sorry, Your Tweets Can Still Be Subpoenaed by Adam Martin

Why You Should Be An Open Notebook Scientist by Anthony Salvagno

Startups that Catalyze Science by Samuel Arbesman

The Scienceblogging Weekly (June 29th, 2012)

Blog of the Week:

This week’s choice was easy – March of the Fossil Penguins, written by Dr. Daniel Ksepka. What is there not to like? Penguins! Fossils! Straight from the keyboard of the leading world expert on the topic. Enjoy!

 

Top 10:

How presidential elections are impacted by a 100 million year old coastline by Craig McClain:

Hale County in west central Alabama and Bamberg County in southern South Carolina are 450 miles apart. Both counties have a population of 16,000 of which around 60% are African American. The median households and per capita incomes are well below their respective state’s median, in Hale nearly $10,000 less. Both were named after confederate officers–Stephen Fowler Hale and Francis Marion Bamberg. And although Hale’s county seat is the self-proclaimed Catfish Capitol, pulling catfish out of the Edisto River in Bamberg County is a favorite past time. These two counties share another unique feature. Amidst a blanket of Republican red both Hale and Bamberg voted primarily Democratic in the 2000, 2004, and again in the 2008 presidential elections. Indeed, Hale and Bamberg belong to a belt of counties cutting through the deep south–Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina–that have voted over 50% Democratic in recent presidential elections. Why? A 100 million year old coastline….

The Curious Case of the Poisoned Cows by Deborah Blum:

On a bright morning in early June, a Texas rancher named Jerry Abel turned his small herd of cattle out to graze. The 18 cows moved hungrily into that field of fresh grass. Within a few hours, only three were still alive. Abel’s 80 acre ranch sits just a little east of Austin and the story was strange enough that on Sunday a local CBS affiliate picked it up. “There was nothing you could do,” Abel told KEYE about his desperate efforts to save the animals. “Obviously, they were dying.”…

In the Steps of a Hungry Acrocanthosaurus by Brian Switek:

Compared to mounted dinosaur skeletons, fossil footprints might seem like mundane objects. They only record one small part of a fantastic creature, and it is harder to envision a whole dinosaur from the ground up than the wrap flesh around a skeletal frame. But we should not forget that dinosaur footprints are fossilized behavior—stone snapshots of an animal’s life. And sometimes, trackways record dramatic moments in dinosaur lives….

When It Comes to Numbers, We’re All Late Bloomers by Elizabeth Preston:

Good news for aspiring jelly-bean jar estimators who are under 30! Your intuitive grasp of numbers may not have peaked yet. Unlike other cognitive skills, the ability to approximate keeps improving well into adulthood. Since the skill is tied to mathematical smarts, this news might bring hope to struggling students….

Summer of Smoke by Christie Aschwanden:

June 8, 2012, Cedaredge Colorado—It was an ordinary Friday afternoon. I was at my desk writing when I looked out the window and saw an enormous plume of smoke billowing from the back of our property. It was the kind of moment when you’re supposed to remain calm and remember all the wise things you learned in first aid class or girl scouts. (Stop! Drop! Roll!) Instead, I panicked.

Plague at the Siege of Caffa, 1346 by Michelle Ziegler:

The first stage of the Black Death among Europeans was said to begin with the whoosh of a Mongol trebuchet. Gabriele De’ Mussi, a lawyer from near Genoa writing in about 1348, is believed to have recorded the account of the earliest use of plague as weapon of war at Caffa in 1346….

New flu gene found hiding in plain sight, and affects severity of infections by Ed Yong:

I could write the entire genome of a flu virus in around 100 tweets. It is just 14,000 letters long; for comparison, our genome has over 3 billion letters. This tiny collection of genetic material is enough to kill millions of people. Even though it has been sequenced time and time again, there is still a lot we don’t know about it….

‘Man-sheep-dog’: inter-species social skills by Paul Keil and Greg Downey:

Paul, the lead author, interviewed sheepdog trialer Damian Wilson about his interactions with his dog, a border collie named Yandarra Whiskey. Damian and Whiskey gave Paul a demonstration of the techniques used in sheepdog competitions as they together tried to move a mob of three sheep. In a competition in New South Wales, a trainer and dog have to move three sheep who have never been herded through a difficult obstacle course, and the trainer loses points if he (or, less frequently, she) breaks from a slow, measured pace walking the course. The rules mean that the dog itself must be trained until it anticipates the sheep’s reactions, and understands, on some level, what dog and trainer, together, are trying to accomplish. Although the trialer may give commands, the dog, too, is a kind of expert….

Preview: 3-D Space Shuttle Movie Will Bring the Launch Pad to Your Living Room by Tanya Lewis:

If you missed the final launch of the Space Shuttle, or the first private spacecraft rendezvous with the International Space Station, fear not. A new documentary to be released late this year promises you a fiery, 3-D, launch-pad view of these historic flights…

A Wartime Medical Dispenser by Jaipreet Virdi:

The Napoleonic Wars brought John Harrison Curtis’ studies to a standstill, as he became one of thousands of young men conscripted to fight against Napoleonic advances towards Britain. With his medical learning in hand, Curtis enlisted in the Royal Navy in 1808, to obtain his qualifications as surgeon and extend his medical skills. Since 1745, the Royal College of Surgeons in London, Edinburgh and Dublin, and the Navy held close associations with each other as the College was responsible for examining naval surgeons for active service. To be admitted as surgeon in the navy, candidates had to obtain a certificate of competence from the College and then be subjected to a two-hour oral examination at Somerset House….

 

Special topic #1: Getting young journalists and scientists to become savvy on the Web:

#Realtalk for the j-school graduate on the first five years of your career by Ann Friedman

Young journalists don’t seem to care about the Web: Why not? by Phillip Smith

Few Tweet successes as Generation Y fails to use blog-standard tools by Elizabeth Gibney

British Ph.D. Students Don’t Tweet by Elizabeth Gibney

 

Special topic #2: Wicked Problems:

Covering Wicked Problems by Jay Rosen

Overcoming Wicked Problems by Michael Shellenberger and Ted Nordhaus

Andrew Revkin on the Super Wicked Problem of Climate Change by Amanda Frank

David Roberts on the Simple Climate Problem by Andrew Revkin

Wicked Problems by UpLook

 

Best Images:

Global Distribution of Nobel Prizes Reflects Great Shifts in Modern History [Infographic] by Scientific American Magazine

 

Best Videos:

Mathematically Correct Breakfast by George Hart

A Song About A Circle Constant by Vi Hart

Oldest Sound Recording Resurrected from Paper by Eric Olson

A Glass Act — Harry Potter Theme Played on Wine Glasses by murayu74

What does traffic have to do with fluid dynamics? by FY! Fluid Dynamics

Milestone for WINS by The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University

Beautiful Black Art by Tony Barnhart

Making the Invisible Visible in Video by MITNewsOffice

How Many Men Does it Take to Pull an Astronaut Out of the Ocean? by Amy Shira Teitel

Scraps to soil: New Yorkers carry compost to Greenmarkets instead of tossing it in the trash by Laura Geggel and Virat Markandeya

Instant Egghead – Do Cosmic Rays Spark Lightning? by Phil Yam

 

Science:

Beware Stimulus Effects in Psychology by Neuroskeptic

Do cephalopods dream of aquatic sheep? and Big in Japan by Zen Faulkes

TGIPF: The Weird World of Banana Slug Sex by Cassandra Willyard

How to Spot Pseudoneuroscience and Biobunk by APS

Bad science not about same-sex parenting by Andrew Perrin

Adrenaline Junkies Look to the Moon for Great New Fix by Amy Shira Teitel

Snakes that chew their food by Andrew Durso

The Anthropocene, and the tech that might save humans by Christie Nicholson

Far out in North Carolina by Stefan Rahmstorf

Ostrich! Get your ostrich here! The man behind the Greenmarket ostrich stand by Taylor Kubota

S.O.S. Save Our Seagrass by Whitney Campbell

What does the way you count on your fingers say about your brain? by Corrinne Burns

Size and evolution by Anthony King

Madness over sea level rise in North Carolina by John Bruno

How Will Global Warming Affect Lizards? A Detailed Physiological Study On Puerto Rican Anoles by Jonathan Losos

Seven sins of scientists part 5: snobbery by Paul Knoepfler

Tidal massaging reveals a hidden ocean on Saturn’s moon, Titan by Matthew Francis

How did the remote control get so awful and confusing? by Daniel Engber

Thoughts on Obamacare by Pal MD

Why supermarket tomatoes look great but taste bland and Exposed: the severe ethical breaches of superhero journalists and Mystery of the flatfish head solved *cough* four years ago *cough* and Why a new case of misconduct in psychology heralds interesting times for the field and Californian condor not extinct yet, but still regularly poisoned by lead by Ed Yong

Shiny! Top 10 reasons why seafarers love Joss Whedon’s Firefly by Miriam Goldstein and Craig McClain

Mysterious Fairy Circles Are ‘Alive’ by Rachel Nuwer

The Dolomite Problem – Peeking Under The Hood by Suvrat Kher

The Curse of the Lead Bullet by Deborah Blum

Should Linus Pauling’s erroneous 1953 model of DNA be retracted? by Jeff Perkel

How to trick people into eating dog food and H*MPING: Why do they do it? by Julie Hecht

The New ExxonMobil: Has the Tiger Changed Its Stripes? and A Court’s Scientific Smackdown: The D.C. Circuit Trashes Science Deniers on Global Warming and the EPA by Chris Mooney

America’s Other Audubon: A Victorian Woman’s Radical Journey of Art, Science & Entrepreneurship by Maria Popova

CDC proposes testing baby boomers for hepatitis C by Jessica M. Morrison

Climate-Studying Seals Bring Back Happy News by Elizabeth Preston

Brave New Worlds by Cameron Walker

Your Color Red Really Could Be My Blue by Natalie Wolchover

Science Denied by Phil Primack

A New Satellite Tool Tracks Deforestation by Rachel Nuwer

Sleeper Sharks Slurp Snoozing Seals by Brian Switek

The Lessons (and Echoes) of Silent Spring by Keith Kloor

The curse of the gingers by PZ Myers

The Higgs Boson is a Liberal Conspiracy To Get The Government More Involved In Mass* by Tom Levenson

Poland’s wolves trot across key wildlife overpasses by DeLene Beeland

In defense of pink microscopes by TheCellularScale

In Defense of #sciencegirlthing by Ben Young Landis

Social Justice in Animals and Animals in Visual Media by Marc Bekoff

Of wanton plants and prudish immune systems: late-night thoughts for National Pollinator Week by Leafwarbler

 

Media, Publishing, Technology and Society:

SciWriteLabs 8.1: The Lehrer affair, consequence-free plagiarism, and rules for blogging and SciWriteLabs 8.2: Is it kosher to re-use wording from Facebook updates in your journalism? And: do we need a Son of Sam law for media miscreants? by Seth Mnookin

Disrupting journalism education, too by Jeff Jarvis and Disrupting education by Dave Winer

Open Notebook Series: What is an Open Notebook? by Anthony Salvagno

Genius writing – or can a good lab journal help you become smarter? by Eric-Wubbo Lameijer

On Blogging, Direction And Ben Radford’s “Still Skeptical of Blogs” by Kylie Sturgess

Launching version 2.2: Twitter Integration by ScienceSeeker

A bad bad week for access by Richard Smith

Social Networking Concept May Have Emerged During Renaissance, Researchers Say by Tara Kelly

Wellcome Trust will penalise scientists who don’t embrace open access by Alok Jha

Shaking Up Israel’s National Archives: A conversation with Israel’s new chief archivist by Yair Rosenberg

Google’s One-Gender-Fits-All T-Shirts Don’t Fit by Ryan Tate

Library of Congress Acquires Carl Sagan Papers by Audrey Fischer

Putting People at the Center of Journalism by Josh Stearns

How do you tell when the news is biased? It depends on how you see yourself by Jonathan Stray

All A’Twitter: How Social Media Aids in Science Outreach – Discussion and Conclusions by Caitlyn
Zimmerman

Did you just tell me to go fuck myself? by Ian Mulvany

Scientists On Twitter: 30 Biologists And Chemists To Follow by Rebecca Searles

Measuring and Visualizing Interdisciplinarity by Samuel Arbesman

Why Porn and Journalism Have the Same Big Problem by Jordan Weissmann

Can you go on the press release diet? A 12-step program by Denise Graveline

How the New York Times technology blog, Bits, perpetuated the myth of a mental illness due to mobile phone use: Or, Follow the money by Les Posen

The Scienceblogging Weekly (June 22nd, 2012)

Blog of the Week:

Like clockwork, almost every day for more than two years, Tommy Leung and Susan Perkins bring you Parasite of the Day. Sometimes gross, but always fascinating. And considering how most of us don’t pay much attention to parasites these days, there is something cool to learn every single day.

 

Top 10:

The only good abortion is my abortion by Maggie Koerth-Baker:

…Of course, we don’t call it an abortion. We call it “a procedure” or a D&C. See, my potential abortion is one of the good abortions. I’m 31 years old. I’m married. These days, I’m pretty well off. I would very much like to stay pregnant right now. In fact, I have just spent the last year—following an earlier miscarriage—trying rather desperately to get pregnant…

Defending Jonah Lehrer by Bradley Voytek (about criticisim of neuroscience, not “self-plagiarism”):

Cognitive neuroscience grew out of experimental psychology, which has decades of amazing observations to link psychology and behavior. But with this legacy comes a lot of baggage. Experimental psychologists observed that we have the capacity for memory, attention, emotion, etc. and they sought to piece those phenomena apart. With the advent of neuroimaging techniques, psychologists put people in brain scanners to see where in the brain behaviors “were”. But this is the wrong way of thinking about these concepts.

The genius myth by Zen Faulkes:

…This myth of destiny and inevitable triumph of genius is, to me, completely the opposite of what science is. The scientific method leveled the playing field for discovering truth. Anyone could follow the methods and get to the bottom of things, so truth was no longer subject to tricky things like personal revelation….

Climate change is simple: We do something or we’re screwed by David Roberts:

…The challenge I took on was to convey the gist of my “brutal logic of climate change” post in a reasonably short amount of time, using as little scientific jargon as possible. Just: there is a problem that calls for urgent action. Business-as-usual means disaster. This is all gloom and doom — not even much humor. I know that turns people off or shuts them down. I know people need to feel a sense of hope and efficacy. I know — indeed, have recently been writing — that we need a vision of a sustainable future. But I needed to do my own version of “Danger Will Robinson!” Just to get it on the record…

Tunes without composers: music naturally evolves on DarwinTunes by Ed Yong:

…The tunes embedded above weren’t written by a composer, but fashioned through natural selection. They are the offspring of DarwinTunes, a program which creates bursts of noise that gradually evolve based on the preferences of thousands of human listeners. After hundreds of generations, tracks that are boring and grating soon morph into tunes that are really quite rhythmic and pleasant (even if they won’t be topping charts any time soon)….

Snake-eating beetles by Andrew Durso:

So little is known about the parasites of snakes that we tend to discount them all together, but the ecological and evolutionary interactions between hosts and their parasites can be very strong. This is a story about how two enterprising snake biologists solved a mystery that had been puzzling entomologists for decades…

Test-Tube Piggies: How did the guinea pig become a symbol of science? by Daniel Engber:

…To call someone or something a guinea pig may suggest a mere experiment (“Joe Biden was put out as a guinea pig for the White House”), or it can invoke the specter of exploitation (the U.S. Army wanted “to use young men as guinea pigs and throw them away”). The image either describes the scientific process or condemns it. It’s a totem or a scarecrow. What makes this wording more curious is the fact that guinea pigs, real ones, don’t mean much to working scientists. For all their rhetorical importance, the animals scarcely register in the lab…

What’s changed in evolution and ecology since I started my Ph.D. by Jeremy Yoder:

Last month, I filed my PhD dissertation, bringing to an end an intellectual and personal journey that began seven years ago in the summer of 2005. I know a lot more now than I did then, and I know a lot more about the boundaries of what I don’t know, too. But not only has my knowledge changed—evolution and ecology looks a lot different now than it did seven years ago when I was planning my dissertation research. At some point, and often multiple points, in the process of getting a PhD, everybody wonders whether what they’re doing is already out of date. Some of the transformations in the field I think I could see coming. For instance, it was clear in 2005 that computational power would keep increasing, phylogenetics would be used more and more to ask interesting questions, more and more genomes would be available for analysis, and evolutionary developmental biology was on the rise. It was unfortunately also predictable that it would be possible to study climate change in real time over PhD-length timescales. And although the 2008 global financial crisis didn’t help, it was clear that funding and jobs were going to be more competitive than they had been for our predecessors….

Drawing sharp boundaries in a fuzzy world by Chris Rowan:

Humans are natural splitters. We have an innate tendency to look at the world and mentally sort everything into different categories, and grades, and entities: this is one thing, that is another; it was this, now it’s that. Our perception of colour is a good example of how our brains automatically split a continuum into discrete boxes. We’ve incorporated our love of classification deep into science, trying to formalise and quantify the dividing lines we want to draw on everything: it’s this when conditions A and B are met, it’s that when we see Y and Z. But nature doesn’t often make it easy for us to draw our sharp dividing lines….

Why the Scientist Stereotype Is Bad for Everyone, Especially Kids by Michael Brooks:

To many – too many – science is something like North Korea. Not only is it impossible to read or understand anything that comes out of that place, there are so many cultural differences that it’s barely worth trying. It’s easier just to let them get on with their lives while you get on with yours; as long as they don’t take our jobs or attack our way of life, we’ll leave them in peace…

 

Special topic #1: Science: It’s a Girl Thing

“Science: It’s a Girl Thing”: Lab Barbie, Extra Lipstick by Maryn McKenna

Hey girl! Science wants YOU – but don’t forget the lipstick by Gozde Zorlu

Girls! Be A Scientist! You too Can Dance in the Lab in High Heels! by Deborah Blum

Friday Sprog Blogging: You’ve made it clear “it’s a girl thing,” but is “it” science? and Science For Princesses and How do we make room for pink microscopes? (More thoughts on gendered science kits.) by Janet D. Stemwedel

#sciencegirlthing: the PR guy’s take by David Wescott

E.U.’s ‘Science, it’s a girl thing’ campaign sparks a backlash by Olga Khazan

Science – It’s a Girl Thing (Insert Facepalm Here) by Carin Bondar and Joanne Manaster

Why “Pinkifying” Science Does More Harm Than Good by Noisy Astronomer

Hey Science, “How YOU doin’?” by Summer Ash

 

Special topic #2: Turtles

Turtle Anatomy, in Stunning Images from 1820 by Maria Popova

Galápagos Monday: Lynn’s Tortoises by Galápagos Monday: Lynn’s Tortoises

Terrifying sex organs of male turtles by Darren Naish

Turtles Have Horrifying Penises by Erin Gloria Ryan

Sex locked in stone: Fossil turtle pairs provide first direct evidence of prehistoric vertebrate mating. by Brian Switek

What Remains in the Rock by Brian Switek

Friday Weird Science: Why, you DIRTY LITTLE HERPS! by Scicurious

Preserved in the Act and Fossilized Turtle Whoopie by Craig McClain

 

Best Videos:

Eating on a Green Roof: New York’s Buildings Provide Food, Habitat for Wildlife by Rachel Nuwer, Chris New and Brennan Kelley

How do Spaceships Landing in Water Not Hit Boats? by Amy Shira Teitel

Must-watch video on rip currents by Miriam Goldstein

Whale Rainbow by rsean9000

Charged Gold Nanoparticles “Unzip” DNA by N.C.State

World Science Festival Fascinates With Robotic Animals, World’s Lightest Material, Quantum Levitation by Cara Santa Maria

 

Best Images:

Human Microbiome Project by Perrin Ireland

Greek octopus forms coalition with dolphin’s genitals by Rowan Hooper

 

Science:

The Difference Between Science ‘Skills’ and ‘Knowledge’ by Emily Richmond

How To Stop Science Alienation Syndrome by Deborah Blum

How to Determine If A Controversial Statement Is Scientifically True by Alan Henry

Numeric Pareidolia and Vortex Math by MarkCC

Tech-Based Dollhouse Inspires Future Girl Scientists by Kellie Foxx-Gonzalez

Med Student Rescues Body Part From Airport Security by Robert Krulwich

Things I Learnt from my (Unscientific) Experiences with Crowdsourcing. by David Ng

In Defense of Genetically Modified Crops by Sarah Zhang

When Did Americans Lose Their British Accents? and Why Do People Feel Phantom Cellphone Vibrations? by Matt Soniak

NASA Astronauts Brought Playmates to the Moon and Valentina Tereshkova Was the First Woman in Space and NASA and FAA Agree on the Future of Spaceflight and Vintage Space Fun Fact: NASA’s Canadian Contingent and Mars Rover Curiosity’s Retro Parachute by Amy Shira Teitel

Brains are Different on Macs by Neuroskeptic

Putting Fear In Your Ears: What Makes Music Sound Scary by Jessica Stoller-Conrad

Former Quantitative Trader Spurns Wall Street to Explore the Final Frontier by Patrick Clark

Can Anoles With Differently Shaped Genitals Interbreed? and Territorial And Thermoregulatory Behavior Of Sri Lankan Otocryptis Lizards by Jonathan Losos

How can scientists communicate to the public if they can’t even explain their work to each other? by Maggie

On this Father’s Day, let’s remember the allofathers, too by Emily Willingham

Are Fathers an Endangered Species? by Paul Raeburn

A shot to the head by Vaughan Bell

Get Ready, Because Voyager I Is *This Close* to Leaving Our Solar System by Rebecca J. Rosen

Does All Wine Taste the Same? by Jonah Lehrer

The Blind Spot: A Requiem by Megan Garber and Driving without a Blind Spot May Be Closer Than It Appears by Rachel Ewing

Notebooks Shed Light on an Antibiotic’s Contested Discovery by Peter Pringle

10-year-old solves science riddle and co-authors paper by Jon White

Keeping strong during a long winter nap by Zen Faulkes

What did Galileo ever do to you? by Ken Perrott

End the macho culture that turns women off science by Athene Donald

What’s in a (Gene) Name? by Hillary Rosner

Darwin, Worm Grunters, and Menacing Moles by Anthony Martin

Growing Up on Zoloft – Talking Drugs, Depression, and Identity With Katherine Sharpe by David Dobbs

ANAL CONES! Diadematid sea urchin mysteries! and Follow up on the Anal Cone! (thanks to the New Scientist) by Christopher Mah

How to find good sperm by Kristian Sjøgren

It has long been a mystery why flamingos in captivity suffer foot lesions. A Danish study now claims to have solved a part of this mystery. by Jeppe Wojcik

Black bears show counting skills on computers by Matt Bardo

DIY biology by Laura H. Kahn

Same Old Story: Too Many Graduate Students by Rob Knop

Scientists Find Weak Evidence That Unhealthy Lifestyles Lead to Weak Sperm by Allie Wilkinson

Sound Scholarly Communication by David De Roure

Sports doping, Victorian style by Vanessa Heggie

Welcome to the Anthropocene by David Biello

Goat Moms Recognize Their Kids Saying “Ma!” and The Shambulance: Ionic Foot Detox Baths by Elizabeth Preston

Thoughts on Tarbosaurus, Part 1. and Part 2 by Victoria Arbour

An Abstemious Home by Jessa Gamble

Crowdfunding: It’s not a grant … or is it? by Rebecca Rashid Achterman

The monthly ring: Expanding HIV prevention options for women by Dr. Zeda Rosenberg

Experiments hint at a new type of electronics: valleytronics and Quantum fluctuations may uncover a clue to high-temperature superconductivity by Matthew Francis

Reinventing the Wheel by Meagan Phelan

When Mammals Ate Dinosaurs by Brian Switek

The Rise of the Fork: Knives and spoons are ancient. But we’ve only been eating with forks for a few centuries. by Sara Goldsmith

‘Silent Spring’ is 50. The Credit, and the Blame, It Deserves. by David Ropeik

As America grows more polarized, conservatives increasingly reject science and rational thought by Amanda Marcotte

In the year 2023, and humans are on Mars for all to see by Kevin Orrman-Rossiter

Scalia’s Republican Brain: Why He’ll Come Up With a Reason to Overturn the Healthcare Mandate by Dylan Otto Krider

Does art-from-science really add anything? by Jon Butterworth

Prairie Ridge Ecostation by Christine L. Goforth

Let’s not get carried away by Markus Pössel

 

Media, Publishing, Technology and Society:

The Slow Web by Jack Cheng

Using Storytelling in Blogs by Maximilian Majewski

I’ll ask the questions here! by M.S.

Lawyer attacking The Oatmeal shocked by big mean Internet’s reaction and Lawyer tries and fails to shut down The Oatmeal’s charitable fundraiser by Casey Johnston and The Oatmeal v. FunnyJunk, Part IV: Charles Carreon Sues Everybody by Ken and The Guy Continues to Mess With The Oatmeal by Kevin Underhill and Funnyjunk’s Lawyer Charles Carreon Just Keeps Digging: Promises He’ll Find Some Law To Go After Oatmeal’s Matt Inman by Mike Masnick

Journalism education cannot teach its way to the future by Howard Finberg and Why Professors Value Journalism Degrees More Than Professionals (Beyond the Obvious) by Carrie Brown-Smith

How would you engage the community in a vagina discussion? by Steve Buttry

Socialising Research: How to get your research results noticed and used. by Jo Hawkins

All A’Twitter: How Social Media Aids in Science Outreach – Chapter 11: Set of Best Practices for Social Media Use by Caitlyn Zimmerman

Teachers and Administrators, Don’t Be Scared of Technology: It Won’t Replace the Classroom by Jody Passanisi and Shara Peters

Is it ok to get paid to promote Open Access? by John Dupuis

Pay attention to what Nick Denton is doing with comments by Clay Shirky

Watergate mythology invites pushback, ignores journalism’s messy nature by Andrew Beaujon

Why Women Still Can’t Have It All by Anne-Marie Slaughter and No One ‘Has It All,’ Because ‘Having It All’ Doesn’t Exist by Lindy West

When Twitter Stumbles, Sites Across the Web Go Down With It by Alexander Furnas

Open Access and Science Communication. Reflections on the need for a more open communication environment by Alessandro Delfanti

A step-by-step approach for science communication practitioners: a design perspective by Maarten C.A. van der Sanden and Frans J. Meijman

Does the technical staff at the World Health Organization (WHO) tweet? by Nina Bjerglund

An Open Letter To Conference Organizers and Panel Moderators by Sean Bonner

Twitterror by Oliver Reichenstein

To create a new social network or not to? Scientists weigh in. by Upwell

The Perfect Technocracy: Facebook’s Attempt to Create Good Government for 900 Million People and Inside Google’s Plan to Build a Catalog of Every Single Thing, Ever by Alexis Madrigal

Why Pen Names Might Be a Bad Idea for Most Bloggers by Ryan Matthew Pierson

Blogging relieves stress on new mothers by Victoria M Indivero

Should We (And Can We) Regulate What We Do Not Understand? by Kathleen Wisneski

Scholars are quickly moving toward a universe of web-native communication by Jason Priem, Judit Bar-Ilan, Stefanie Haustein, Isabella Peters, Hadas Shema, and Jens Terliesner

Bill Marriott: Chairman of the Blog by Michael S. Rosenwald

Apps I Want to Go Away by Sam Grobart

Some Thoughts on Peer Review and Altmetrics by Ian Mulvany

 

Extra: On the Finch report on Open Access:

Open access is the future of academic publishing, says Finch report by Alok Jha

The Finch Report on open access: it’s complicated by Stephen Curry

First thoughts on the Finch Report: Good steps but missed opportunities by Cameron Neylon

U.K. Panel Backs Open Access for All Publicly Funded Research Papers by Kai Kupferschmidt

Finch Report, a Trojan Horse, Serves Publishing Industry Interests Instead of UK Research Interests by Stevan Harnad

 

Extra: On the “self-plagiarism” saga:

On science blogs this week: Jonah Lehrer by Tabitha M. Powledge

Jonah Lehrer: The issues are simple by Paul Raeburn

This Week in Review: The potential of Microsoft’s Surface, and keeping blogging ideas fresh by Mark Coddington

Jonah Lehrer, Hypertext Author by Dorian Taylor

Jonah Lehrer “Self-Plagiarism” Brouhaha is Crap by Matthew E May

New Journalistic Workflow by Bora Zivkovic

Blogging and recycling: thoughts on the ethics of reuse. by Janet D. Stemwedel

How Jonah Lehrer should blog by Felix Salmon

The ethics of recycling content: Jonah Lehrer accused of self-plagiarism by Jonathan M. Gitlin

A (Partial) Defense of Jonah Lehrer by Robert Wright

The Tyranny of Novelty by Matthew Francis

Jonah Lehrer, self-borrowing and the problem with “big ideas” by Laura Hazard Owen

The Scienceblogging Weekly (June 15th, 2012)

Blog of the Week:

Russ Williams is the Director of the North Carolina Zoological Society and, as far as I know, the only “director of a zoo” who blogs. And does he ever – Russ has been blogging up a storm ever since 2005 when Ed Cone taught him how (you may call me The Blogfather, but Ed Cone is the blogfather for many of us in North Carolina). On his blog Russlings, Russ covers plenty – what is new at the N.C.Zoo in Asheboro, what is new in other zoos around the country and the world, what is new in policy and politics of animal conservation, plus cool pictures and videos of wildlife. But where the value really comes up is at the times of natural disasters – Russ is “in the know” and often the first and/or the only person to blog about the status of zoos and aquaria, as well as farm animals, wildlife preserves etc, in the affected areas. During disasters, Russlings is the Go-To place for such coverage.

 

Top 10:

How Our Disinterest in ‘The Environment’ Signals the End of Nature by Christopher Mims:

No one reading this has the slightest fucking clue what “nature” is, and in 1995 fisheries scientist Daniel Pauly proved it. In the paper that introduced the term “shifting baselines,” Pauly described how experts who determined how many fish should be caught often started with whatever the baseline state of the ecosystem was when they started their careers, instead of considering what a fishery might have looked like in the past, when it wasn’t nearly as degraded….

Getting used to being in charge of the planet by David Roberts:

…Nonetheless, like evolution, the dominance of human beings on Spaceship Earth is a profound and terrifying threat to all sorts of traditional worldviews. If Darwin showed us that God is not our author, the Anthropocene shows that He is not our caretaker. There’s no parent to supply us with endless resources and endless room to dispose of our waste. There’s no one to protect us or prevent us from screwing it all up….

Walking the Line: How to Identify Safe Limits for Human Impacts on the Planet by David Biello:

Is preserving the general environmental conditions that allowed civilization to flourish—a moderate climate, a rich array of species, rivers that reach the sea—necessary to ensure humanity endures? Or is minimizing alterations to the global environment introduced by human activity—rising levels of CO2 from fossil-fuel burning, widespread extinction, dams that impound water—more important to our success? Choosing the right approach is vital as the scale of human impact on the planet becomes so large that scientists are calling this new epoch in Earth’s history the Anthropocene (when human activity alters global climate and ecosystems)…

#GMOFAQ: Transferring genes from one species to another is neither unnatural nor dangerous by Michael Eisen:

Last week I wrote about the anti-science campaign being waged by opponents of the use of genetically modified organisms in agriculture. In that post, I promised to address a series of questions/fears about GMOs that seem to underly peoples’ objections to the technology. I’m not going to try to make this a comprehensive reference site about GMOs and the literature on their use and safety (I’m compiling some good general resources here.) I want to say a few things about myself too…

Sea level rise 101 by John Bruno:

Based on the NC legislature’s decree about the science of sea level rise projections and some of the related propaganda we have seen from climate change deniers, I get the sense there is a lot of confusion about sea level rise. So here is a primer on what we know about sea level and climate change…

Dirty soil and diabetes: Anniston’s toxic legacy by Brett Israel:

The Rev. Thomas Long doesn’t have neighbors on Montrose Avenue anymore. Everyone is gone. Widespread chemical contamination from a Monsanto plant was discovered in this quiet city in the Appalachian foothills back in the 1990s. In West Anniston, behind Long’s home, a church was fenced off, and men in “moon suits” cleaned the site for weeks. Nearby, boarded windows and sunken porches hang from abandoned shotgun houses. Stray dogs roam the narrow streets. A red “nuisance” sign peeks above the un-mowed lawn of one empty house. Bulldozers will be here soon…

Pollution, Poverty, People of Color: No beba el agua. Don’t drink the water. by Liza Gross

Jessica Sanchez sits on the edge of her seat in her mother’s kitchen, hands resting on her bulging belly. Eight months pregnant, she’s excited about the imminent birth of her son. But she’s scared too. A few feet away, her mother, Bertha Dias, scrubs potatoes with water she bought from a vending machine. She won’t use the tap water because it’s contaminated with nitrates…

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part II) by Aatish Bhatia:

Lately, I’ve got colors on the brain. In part I of this post I talked about the common roads that different cultures travel down as they name the colors in their world. And I came across the idea that color names are, in some sense, culturally universal. The way that languages carve up the visual spectrum isn’t arbitrary. Different cultures with independent histories often end up with the same colors in their vocabulary. Of course, the word that they use for red might be quite different – red, rouge, laal, whatever. Yet the concept of redness, that vivid region of the visual spectrum that we associate with fire, strawberries, blood or ketchup, is something that most cultures share….

How the Chicken Conquered the World by Jerry Adler and Andrew Lawler:

The chickens that saved Western civilization were discovered, according to legend, by the side of a road in Greece in the first decade of the fifth century B.C. The Athenian general Themistocles, on his way to confront the invading Persian forces, stopped to watch two cocks fighting and summoned his troops, saying: “Behold, these do not fight for their household gods, for the monuments of their ancestors, for glory, for liberty or the safety of their children, but only because one will not give way to the other.” The tale does not describe what happened to the loser, nor explain why the soldiers found this display of instinctive aggression inspirational rather than pointless and depressing. But history records that the Greeks, thus heartened, went on to repel the invaders, preserving the civilization that today honors those same creatures by breading, frying and dipping them into one’s choice of sauce. The descendants of those roosters might well think—if they were capable of such profound thought—that their ancient forebears have a lot to answer for….

‘Sexual depravity’ of penguins that Antarctic scientist dared not reveal by Robin McKie:

It was the sight of a young male Adélie penguin attempting to have sex with a dead female that particularly unnerved George Murray Levick, a scientist with the 1910-13 Scott Antarctic Expedition. No such observation had ever been recorded before, as far as he knew, and Levick, a typical Edwardian Englishman, was horrified. Blizzards and freezing cold were one thing. Penguin perversion was another….

 

Special topic #1: stimulants in school:

The Questions About ADHD Drugs The New York Times Didn’t Ask by Matthew Herper

The labels change, the game remains the same by Vaughan Bell

The NY Times: When Stimulants Are Bad by Robert Whitaker

The Horror of Drug-Boosted Grades and SAT Scores by Jacob Sullum

Should Ritalin Be Distributed To Everyone Taking the SATs? by Gary Stix.

 

Special topic #2: Prometheus and science in the movies:

The biology of Prometheus by Zen Faulkes

The Science of Prometheus – a review, containing a lot of spoilers by Frank Swain

Prometheus: an archaeological perspective (sort of). by Henry Rothwell

Ridley Scott’s Prometheus Examines the Roots of Alien’s Mythology by Larry Greenemeier

‘Prometheus’ Offers a Creationist Indulgence for Science Geeks by James Gorman

Prometheus: what was that about? Ten key questions by Ben Walters

Stealing fire by Zen Faulkes

Space: The Science of Prometheus by Discovery News

What’s Wrong With Prometheus (a Partial List) by Julian Sanchez


Best Videos:

Instant Egghead – What Causes Brain Freeze? by Ferris Jabr and Eric Olson

The Fabulab’s Flame Challenge by Jeanne Garbarino, Perrin Ireland and Deborah Berebichez

Curly Haired Mafia – Prometheus SPOILERS!!! (video) by Lali DeRosier, DNLee and Dr.Rhubidium


Best Image:

UCD worker wins award for rare photo of bee sting in action by Andrea Gallo


Science:

Sensory Ecology of the Third Eye by Ashli Moore

Lovely Lysenko by Dominic Berry

Assuming the Doctor’s a ‘He’ by Danielle Ofri, M.D.

Why We (Accidentally) Name Babies for Hurricanes by Elizabeth Preston

What is a vagina? by Emily Willingham

Imaginary Numbers are Real by Matthew Francis

Curious Experiments by Archbishop Marsh’s Library. “‘Curious Experiments’ for ‘The Amusement and Entertainment of Ladies, as well as Gentlemen’ which took place before a paying audience in Dublin in 1743.” recreated by high school students 270 years later.

Crowdfunding: A New Opportunity for Science and Innovation by John R. Platt

Old Books that Guided Science by Samuel Arbesman

Why you probably won’t experience your own traumatic death by George Dvorsky

June Gloom by Cameron Walker

Dear Slate: America Needs More Artists by See Arr Oh

Negative results and dodgy papers: keep quiet or publish? by Tom W. Phillips

Our Animal Natures by Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers

‘I’m Not Your Wife!’ A New Study Points to a Hidden Form of Sexism by Gayle Tzemach Lemmon

Achtman on Plague Evolution by Michelle Ziegler

Would You Call Me A Scientist? by Sheril Kirshenbaum

Visiting “Brains. The Mind as Matter” at the Wellcome Collection by The curious neuron

Food Trade Too Complex to Track Food Safety by Maryn McKenna

The Johannes Kepler Defense by Romeo Vitelli

Taking the colour out of light. by Thony C. “The man who didn’t invent the achromatic lens” John Dollond born 9 June 1706.

Carnivorous plants respond to increased soil nitrogen, eco-news websites completely miss the point by Andrew Thaler

Virginia Lawmaker Says ‘Sea Level Rise’ Is A ‘Left Wing Term,’ Excises It From State Report On Coastal Flooding by Rebecca Leber

Teaching Neuroanatomy With A Showercap by Neuroskeptic

Fungus Inside Us: A New Health Frontier? by Brandon Keim

The Top Ten Strangest Self-Experiments Ever by Alex Boese

G r e a t e r / l e t t e r / s p a c i n g / helps reading in dyslexia by The Neurocritic

Dangerous Interventions: MMS and Autism by Emily Willingham

Cholera vaccine deployed to control African outbreak by Gozde Zorlu

Bath salts and… zombies? by Donna

You Don’t Have What it Takes by Lucy E. Hornstein MD

What they didn’t tell you about the transit of Venus by Rebekah Higgitt

Science Outreach: What Do You Need? by Matt Shipman

Double Xpression: Liz Neeley, Science Communicator Extraordinaire by Jeanne Garbarino

Overeating Makes Flies Obese, Diabetic, Dead by Elizabeth Preston

Creationism Uses Dinosaurs to Lure Kids Into Radical Ideas, But Scientists Should Not Care Too Much by Cameron English

No, America Does NOT Need More Scientists and Engineers by Derek Lowe

Plant uses chemical weapons to make mice spit out its seeds and To control cannibal toads, you just need the right bait and Fear of spiders changes bodies of grasshoppers and makes plants decay more slowly and Microbial Menagerie and Male spider castrates himself and gets more stamina by Ed Yong

Where have I been? Or, science outreach’s place in science. by Lauren Meyer

The culinary adventures of a cuttlefish by Jonas

Science Communication: A sort-of-kind-of Carnival, and some more thoughts of mine by Scicurious

Scientists map ‘Facebook for birds’ by Alan Boyle

Double Xpression: Debbie Berebichez, PhD Physicist by Jeanne Garbarino

The anthropologist and the kurgans by John Hawks

Scientists Tackle The Geography Of Nature Vs. Nurture In Maps Of U.K. by Ted Burnham

Does Acceptance of Evolution Matter? by Ed Brayton

Did Neanderthals Produce Cave Paintings? by Sarah Everts


Media, Publishing, Technology and Society:

Sorry, Young Man, You’re Not the Most Important Demographic in Tech by Alexis Madrigal

Online Seniors: Tech-Savvier Than You Think by Frederic Lardinois

Open access to research is inevitable, says Nature editor-in-chief by Alok Jha

A Serious Look at Funny Faces by Henry Adams – on the history of cartoons.

An Anarchist Constitution for Twitter by Rebecca Greenfield

Why Twitter Matters: Tomorrow’s Knowledge Network by Nigel Cameron

Learning To Write From Chopin by Murr Brewster

An alternative to the college degree? by Amy Scott

From scrubbing floors to Ivy League: Homeless student to go to dream college by Vivian Kuo

11 dreams for the publishing debate — #1 fewer papers and 11 dreams for the publishing debate — #2 get real credit for surveys and exposition and 11 dreams for the publishing debate — #3 get real credit for refereeing and #4 get real credit for communicating and
#5 sharing all our work every way we can by Peter Krautzberger

All A’Twitter: How Social Media Aids in Science Outreach – Chapter 8: Talking with the Social Media Experts and Chapter 9: Gathering Survey Results, and Chapter 10: Coming to Conclusions by Caitlyn Zimmerman

Why the World’s Most Perfect News Tweet Is Kind of Boring by Megan Garber

Do Journo Watchers Ignore Environmental Beat? by Keith Kloor

Exhausted With The Same by Erika Napoletano

Why you should be excited about vector-based maps in iOS 6 by Tim De Chant

Pitch Perfect – a primer for scientists reaching out to journalists by Liz Neeley

Social media and Google Analytics – who’s interested in botany? by Alun Salt

Paying for information versus *access* to information: A key distinction for news publishers by Robert Niles

Please RT by n+1 editors

The Scienceblogging Weekly (June 8th, 2012)

Wow – this was hard! I could have had at least Top 20 instead of Top 10 (but you’ll find them all listed down there anyway)…

 

Blog of the Week:

Tanya Khovanova’s Math Blog is a blog by Tanya Khovanova, a Visiting Scholar and Research Affiliate at MIT, a 1976 gold medalist (and 1975 silver medalist) at the International Mathematics Olympiad. What she does the most (though there is occasionally other stuff there) is to pose difficult (and some not to so difficult) mathematical problems and puzzles for her readers to try to solve in the comments. Go ahead and give it a try yourself!

 

Top 10:

Sea Level Rise Is Tied to Prevalence of Homosexuality by Craig McClain:

Although only two years old and previously unrecognized by the scientific establishment, Global Draining (GD) has now become a widely accepted theory. GD states that sea level is falling not rising (Southern Fried Science, 2010a). Current rates of GD indicate the entire world’s ocean will be empty by 2026 (Southern Fried Science, 2010a). Local-scale observation of in situ draining combined with a robust theoretical model firmly place the rate of draining at 40 Gigatons of water per year (Dr. M, 2010). It has been argued that both one and multiple holes occur in the ocean floor that allow for GD (i.e. the monoclavis versus polyclavis hypotheses via McCay, 2010; Southern Fried Science, 2010b). However, the impacts and causes of GD are not clearly understood. Despite this, GD is a fundamental tenet of nearly every facet of science and likely correlated with many aspects of biology, economics, sociology, religion, and politics. For example, GD is likely to lead to massive die offs of sharks and reduce global atmospheric oxygen levels (Shark Diver, 2010)…

The crayola-fication of the world: How we gave colors names, and it messed with our brains (part I) by Aatish Bhatia:

In Japan, people often refer to traffic lights as being blue in color. And this is a bit odd, because the traffic signal indicating ‘go’ in Japan is just as green as it is anywhere else in the world. So why is the color getting lost in translation? This visual conundrum has its roots in the history of language…

Arsenic Life Wrap-Up: The Good, the ‘Not-So-Good’ by See Arr Oh:

“Arsenic Life,” a hot-button issue for much of the past year, reemerged this week with two new papers, one propitious, and one, well…not so much….

In defense of frivolities and open-ended experiments by Bradley Voytek:

My first child was born just about nine months ago. From the hospital window on that memorable day, I could see that it was surprisingly sunny for a Berkeley autumn afternoon. At the time, I’d only slept about three of the last 38 hours. My mind was making up for the missing haze that usually fills the Berkeley sky. Despite my cloudy state, I can easily recall those moments following my first afternoon laying with my newborn son. In those minutes, he cleared my mind better than the sun had cleared the Berkeley skies…

Women’s Work by Virginia Hughes:

I write mostly about neuroscience, genetics and biotechnology. That means I spend most of my time talking to and writing about men.

In May of 2011 (chosen arbitrarily just because it was a year ago and I’m pretty sure I wasn’t thinking about this gender gap then), 89 percent of my phone interviews were with men.

I can think of a few reasons for this…

The Mechanics and Meaning of That Ol’ Dial-Up Modem Sound by Alexis Madrigal:

Of all the noises that my children will not understand, the one that is nearest to my heart is not from a song or a television show or a jingle. It’s the sound of a modem connecting with another modem across the repurposed telephone infrastructure. It was the noise of being part of the beginning of the Internet…

I’m not a speciesist, but… by Jack Scanlan:

Is it a paradox to hate your own species? Is such a feeling the product of a broken and conflicted mind? Or could it perhaps be the signature of psychopathy? Every day these questions run through my mind and I feel guilty. Why? Well, because I do hate my own species. Homo sapiens is terrible, and I’m surprised more people don’t recognise this…

The science and ethics of voluntary amputation by Mo Costandi:

…In January 2000, the mass media ran several stories about Robert Smith, a surgeon at the Falkirk and District Royal Infirmary who had amputated the legs of two patients at their own request and was planning a third amputation. The news stories incorrectly described the patients as suffering from Body Dysmorphic Disorder. They further stated that the director of NHS trust running the hospital at which Smith works described the amputation of healthy limbs as “inappropriate”; since then, no British hospital has performed a voluntary amputation…

In Defense of Mickey Mouse Science by Byron Jennings:

…I suppose one could hook up the computers directly to the experiments and have them generate models, test the models against new observations and then modify the experimental apparatus without any human intervention. However, I am not sure that would be science. Science is ultimately a human activity and the models we produce are products of the human mind. It is not enough that the computer knows the answer. We want to have some feeling for the results, to understand them. Without the simple models, Mickey Mouse science, that would not be possible: the big news made ever so small…

From plaster to programming: How borrowed technologies are changing paleontology by Justine E. Hausheer:

In popular culture, paleontologists are like Indiana Jones. Rugged men wandering through rocky deserts, wearing wide-brimmed leather hats and multi-pocketed khaki vests. Rock-hammers hang nonchalantly from their belt-loops, maps and note-pads protrude from pockets. On a whim, they brush aside some sand to reveal a ferocious skull and massive vertebrae, and then they puzzle out the mysteries of dinosaurs just by staring at the rocks. But in contemporary science, paleontologists are biologists, computer programmers, and engineers…

 

Special topic: Scientists, Journalism and Outreach

Eh, the whole week started with The Unwritten Rules of Journalism by Adam Ruben and then the blogosphere exploded – see for yourself:

Make Me Feel Something, Please by Soren Wheeler

Will Scientists Ever Get Science Writing? by Deborah Blum

Science Careers Magazine: A platform for a funny guy who says he really hates science journalism by Charlie Petit

Keep Cool Science Journalists by Khalil A. Cassimally

Congratulations! You’re Dumb! by Matthew Francis

Science is more than freaks and circuses by Paul Livingston

A KISS for communicating science by biochembelle

Scientists Engaging With The Public: Let’s Get Started and Talking About Science: Why Do You Do What You Do? by Matt Shipman

Summary of the #ReachingOutSci Series by nature.com Communities Team

On Outreach: something’s got to give by scicurious

A Call To Arms For Young Science Journalists by Khalil A. Cassimally

Which came first, rewarding outreach or doing it? On chickens, eggs, and overworked scientists by Kate Clancy

The root of problems by Zen Faulkes

Quick thoughts on the what and why of science outreach by Cedar Riener

Where Have All the Scientists Gone? by Magdeline Lum

Why are scientists trapped in the ivory tower and what can be done to escape? by Jeanne Garbarino

Speak Up, Scientists! by Tom Bartlett

So You Want To Communicate Science Online: The Flowchart by Miriam Goldstein

Some Scattered Thoughts on Outreach Work by Eight Crayon Science

One Venus transit – but many kinds of scientific outreach by Chris Rowan

 

Best Videos:

A Wildlife Rescue Center for New York City by Rachel Nuwer, video by Kelly Slivka and Kate Yandell.

The Curious Sex Lives Of Animals (VIDEO) by Cara Santa Maria and Carin Bondar

What we didn’t know about penis anatomy (video) by Diane Kelly

CreatureCast – Ginko (video) by Casey Dunn

Fruitfly Development, Cell by Cell (video) by Joe Hanson

 

Science:

How Our Disinterest in ‘The Environment’ Signals the End of Nature by Christopher Mims

Dramatic impacts on beach microbial communities following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill by Holy Bik

I Point To TED Talks and I Point to Kim Kardashian. That Is All. by Carl Zimmer

NASA’s Manned Venus Orbital Mission and This Is What Happens When Galaxies Collide and The X-15′s First Glide by Amy Shira Teitel

North Carolina’s attempted ban on sea level rise is a boon for Global Draining researchers by Southern Fried Scientist

How Intuition and the Imagination Fuel Scientific Discovery and Creativity: A 1957 Guide by Maria Popova

Battleship Earth: Does the Pentagon have the right weapons to fight off an alien invasion? by Cara Parks and Joshua E. Keating

Is Arsenic the Worst Chemical in the World? and The Arsenic Diet by Deborah Blum

Bad Reaction: The Toxicity of Chemical-Free Claims by Sharon Hill

Peptide shows potential to reverse skin fibrosis and Turning down the heat revs up brown fat by Kathleen Raven

Mermaids Embodies the Rotting Carcass of Science TV and Time for a Dinosaur Attack? by Brian Switek

David Dobbs and science storytelling: Lost in your brain. by Paul Raeburn

Piscine Geriatrics and Update on the iFish by whizbang

“HULK SMASH GM” – mixing angry Greens with bad science by Martin Robbins

For an Isolated Tribe, Time Follows the Terrain, and the Future is Uphill by Valerie Ross

Turning Scientific Perplexity into Ordinary Statistical Uncertainty by Cosma Shalizi

Credible Amelia Earhart Signals Were Ignored by Rossella Lorenzi and More Amelia Earhart Nonsense by Brian Dunning

“How do you feel about Evidence-Based Medicine?” by Harriet Hall

Wind-aided birds on their way north by Liz O’Connell

Transit of Venus through the ages by Jonathan Nally

Attempts to predict earthquakes may do more harm than good by David Petley

Reporting Preliminary Findings by Steven Novella

What makes sea-level rise? by Stefan Rahmstorf

Detectable but not hazardous: radioactive marine life of Fukushima by Miriam Goldstein

Elaine Fuchs: “There’s no comfortable route for a scientist” by Rachel Zwick

Why the GOP distrusts science and Conservatives Attack Scientific Findings About Why They Hate Science (Helping to Confirm the Science) by Chris Mooney

Jumping Vampire Spiders Choose Victims by Headwear and Why You Can’t Kill a Mosquito with a Raindrop and Rare Blooms by Elizabeth Preston

To study vampire spiders, build Frankenstein mosquitoes and Cockroaches and geckos disappear by swinging under ledges… and inspire robots and Giant insects disappeared thanks to falling oxygen levels and agile birds and Bacteria turn themselves into living electric grids by sending currents down mineral wires and How to weigh dinosaurs with lasers and Will we ever… clone a mammoth? by Ed Yong

New species are found all the time, even in Europe. by Tim Parshall

Sunday morning musings by PalMD

Winning the climate culture war and The top five things voters need to know about conservatives and climate change by David Roberts

Genetic Modification – What’s the big deal? by Donna

Cancer on the Brain by David Ropeik

Learning by Making: American kids should be building rockets and robots, not taking standardized tests. by Dale Dougherty

“Arsenic bacteria”: If you hadn’t nailed ‘im to the perch ‘e’d be pushing up the daisies by Ashutosh Jogalekar

BP Demands Scientist Emails in Gulf Oil Spill Lawsuit by Brandon Keim

Will Lex Luthor save North Carolina from climate change? by Michael Yudell

Coordinated Hunting in Red Devils by Craig McClain

Use it or lose it? by Levi Morran

Natural voyeurism: Animal webcams make peeping Toms of us all by Kelly Slivka

Why We Don’t Believe In Science by Jonah Lehrer

Mermaids do not exist, and five other important things people should, but do not, know about the ocean by WhySharksMatter

Transits of Earth from Other Planets by John Rennie

Bend me, shape me: flexible electronics perform under punishing conditions by Matthew Francis

The Invasivore’s Dilemma by Michelle Nijhuis

Beware Of The Branches: The Impacts Of Habitat Structure On Locomotion And Path Choice by Timothy Higham

Science Hubris, or Shame on You, Mayim Bialik by Lucy E. Hornstein MD

Your guide to zombie parasite journalism by Carl Zimmer

Science Gallery Pushes Art With A Social Conscience by Lucas Kavner

This Is Your Quail on Drugs, Behaving Badly by Neda Semnani

Making neuroscience public: Neurohype, neuroscepticism and neuroblogging by Brigitte Nerlich

Dictators Turn Strangely Benevolent in Online Game by Dave Mosher

The Platypus Fallacy. by T. Ryan Gregory

What You Know About the Difference in Dolphins and Porpoises is Wrong by SoundingTheSea

Has the public’s understanding of science devolved into a perverse worship of uncertainty? by Pamela Ronald

Darwin’s ‘clumsy’ prose by Angelique Richardson

Life and science challenges: flames, Hawkeye, the needle and the damage done by Jeanne Garbarino

Mars One: The Martian Chronicles or Big Brother Live on Mars? by Danica Radovanovic

Driving without a Blind Spot May Be Closer Than It Appears by Rachel Ewing

I love waking up to bad science in the morning paper by Rachel Felt

Interloper of the Venus Transit by Phil Plait

Brian: The Typographical Error that Brought Early Career Neuroscientists and Artists Together by Megan J. Dowie, Erin Forsyth and Leah Forsyth

How can I stop…… stammering? by Stuart Farrimond

Identical Twins, Different Lives by Neuroskeptic

That Antidepressants In Water Cause Autism Study by Neuroskeptic, and Fish, Antidepressants, Autism and a Problematic Research Premise by Dorothy Bishop, and Taking the Bait: A Fish (and autism) Story by Deborah Blum

Zombies are not a health problem (for us). Should they be a solution? by Jonathan Purtle

Portrait of the Archaeologist as Young Artist by Heather Pringle

Building a Shadow CV by Jacquelyn Gill

WHO adopts global vaccine action plan by Gozde Zorlu

The Republican Brain: The perils and promise of taking a stand. by Paul Raeburn

N. Carolina Senate decides to include science in sea level projections after all by John Timmer

 

Media, Publishing and Technology:

Lessons in blogging (and tweeting) from Samuel Pepys by Justin Ellis

Social Networks Over Time and the Invariants of Interaction by Samuel Arbesman

This I believe about journalism, newspapers and the future of media by Tim J. McGuire

Beyond citations: Scholars’ visibility on the social Web by Judit Bar-Ilan, Stefanie Haustein, Isabella Peters, Jason Priem, Hadas Shema and Jens Terliesner

Wi-Fi and Amtrak: Missed Connections by Ron Nixon – obviously written by someone who’s never boarded anything but Acela, which is notorious for bad wifi. I find wifi perfectly usable on the Carolinian route of Amtrak.

The North West London Blues by Zadie Smith

SPARC Open Access Newsletter, issue #164 by Peter Suber

Facebook will sell me to you, and you to me by Scott Rosenberg

A brief history of Car Talk: “They’ve changed the way people see public radio in America” by Andrew Phelps

Ebook revolution can kindle a passion for publishing by Ed Victor

My Gettysburg oration: A vision for journalism that can long endure by Steve Buttry

All A’Twitter: How Social Media Aids in Science Outreach – Chapter 6: Struggles of Facebook for the Multipurpose Marine Cadastre and Chapter 7: Survey Design by Caitlyn Zimmerman

Not a fan of the big Bitly revamp? Here are 9 alternatives by Nancy Messieh and A little free advice for Bitly by Dave Winer

Added Value: I do not think those words mean what you think they mean and 25,000 signatures and still rolling: Implications of the White House petition by Cameron Neylon

Sustainable quality by Dan Conover

Revisiting the View from Nowhere by John L. Robinson

How Writing A Science Blog Saved My PhD and 3 Mandatory Tools For Digital Scientists by Julio Peironcely

How the Internet Became Boring by Christopher Mims

“Dear Author” by Ted C. MacRae

What Is a Blog Post? by Rob Jenkins

Startup Culture: Values vs. Vibe by Chris Moody

Ask TON: Organizing notes by Jeanne Erdmann and Siri Carpenter

Why Reporting Is Ripe For Innovation by Vadim Lavrusik

Guys! I Have the Next Big Thing: A Social Network for Hermit Crabs by Alexis Madrigal

Arianna Huffington says HuffPo’s ‘sideboob’ news page is meant as a joke by Ruth Spencer

Does your newsroom have a smart-refrigerator strategy? by Adrienne LaFrance

How to improve environmental coverage? by Curtis Brainard

10 Timeframes by Paul Ford

It’s a Googly World: A Map of the Planet’s Most Visited Websites by Country by Rebecca J. Rosen

Twitter Gives you the Bird by Armin and Twitter’s new bird logo by Dave Winer

The great newspaper liquidation by Jack Shafer