Science Cafe Raleigh – Energy for the Future

The Science Café for July (description below) will be held on July 21st at Tir Na Nog. This is the season when our utility bills begin to skyrocket. Our costly electric bills often bring into focus the high demand our community has for energy, as well as questions about where electricity will be coming from in the future as North Carolina’s population grows. This will be the subject of our next cafe. We will be meeting Dr. David McNelis from UNC-Chapel Hill’s Institute for the Environment. Dr. McNelis will give us information about options that we have for energy production in our future. What are the safest and most viable options that we have to choose from? Are there renewable energy sources that can meet our needs in North Carolina? Here is a link to a collection of articles from the New York Times that may help you begin thinking about this complex and very important topic. (http://www.nytimes.com/ref/science/earth/energy.html).
Energy for the Future
Tuesday July 21, 2009
6:30-8:30 p.m. with discussion beginning at 7:00 followed by Q&A
Tir Na Nog 218 South Blount Street, Raleigh, 833-7795
What does our energy future look like? As new options become available, how soon will we see a difference in transportation and in the supply and use of electricity in our homes and businesses? What are some realistic expectations we should have for the reduction of carbon emissions from energy use? Come to our café and join in on a discussion of energy sources for the future.
About the Speaker:
Professor David N McNelis has over 45 years of environmental sciences and engineering experience in federal government, university and industry settings. He served in research and research management positions with the U.S. Army, the U.S. Public Health Service and the Environmental Protection Agency; with the Department of Energy’s prime contractor for the Nevada Test Site; with the University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and now serves as the Director of the Center for Sustainable Energy, Environment and Economic Development in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Institute for the Environment and as President of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technologies, LLC. Currently he specializes in conventional, alternative and nuclear energy systems and technologies and the nuclear fuel cycle (including partitioning, transmutation, repository capacity and nuclear non proliferation).
This café is sponsored by Progress Energy.
RSVP to kateyDOTahmannATncdenrDOTgov

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