My Picks From ScienceDaily

Sex In The Morning Or In The Evening?:

Hens solicit sex in the morning to avoid sexual harassment in male-dominated groups of chickens, shown in a new study by Hanne Løvlie of Stockholm University, Sweden, and Dr Tommaso Pizzari of the University of Oxford, UK.

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Insects’ Nervous Systems May Provide Clues On Neurodegenerative Diseases:

By studying the addition of sugars to proteins — a process called glycosylation — in the nervous system of insects, Temple University researcher Karen Palter believes she may be able to better understand neurodegenerative diseases in humans. Currently, her lab is involved in two collaborative research projects exploring the glycosylation process that could eventually play important roles in producing therapeutic drugs more efficiently and understanding neurodegenerative diseases such as epilepsy and memory loss.

Scientist Observes Brain Cell Development In ‘Real Time’:

For the first time anywhere, a researcher at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has succeeded in observing in vivo the generation of neurons in the brain of a mammal.

Study Focuses On Only Carnivore With ‘Fingerprints’:

A new study in the May issue of the Journal of Wildlife Management reports that scientists from the New York State Museum, Wildlife Conservation Society and other groups have teamed up with the New York State Department of Criminal Justice to developed a new technique that uses fingerprints to track the fisher–an elusive member of the weasel family, and the only carnivore species known to have unique fingerprints.

How Will Climate Change Affect Arctic Predators?:

As part of the International Polar Year (IPY), four projects from the University of Tromsø have received funding from the Research Council of Norway (NFR) to start research which can contribute to a wider understanding of climate change in the Arctic.

Army Ants Form Living Pothole Plugs For Their Roads:

Certain army ants in the rainforests of Central and South America conduct spectacular predatory raids containing up to 200,000 foraging ants. Remarkably, some ants use their bodies to plug potholes in the trail leading back to the nest, making a flatter surface so that prey can be delivered to the developing young at maximum speed.

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