Category Archives: OpenLab10

A couple of Big Announcements about The Open Laboratory

First Big Announcement:

The first couple of reviews of the 2010 anthology are now out: by Dr. Alistair Dove at Deep Sea News and by Ariel Carpenter at USC News. Check them out. If you have read the book and have a place to publish a review, we’ll appreciate it – just send us the link.

Second Big Announcement:

I am very excited to announce the Guest Editor for the 2011 – a good friend, a marvelous writer, and a great blogger: Jennifer Ouellette (blog, Twitter). I am looking forward to working with Jennifer over the course of the year to produce the best anthology yet!

Third Big Announcement:

After five years of self-publishing the book with Lulu.com, the Open Laboratory now has a real publisher! Yes!

I am happy to announce that the sixth anthology will be published by Scientific American Books, an imprint of Farrar, Straus and Giroux. Both Scientific American and Farrar, Straus and Giroux are part of the same publishing empire – McMillan – so this is a natural marriage between the two.

Jennifer Ouellette and I will work closely with Amanda Moon, Book Editor at Scientific American and Senior Editor at Farrar, Straus and Giroux, on producing the next volume.

What does this mean, and what will change?

The first phase of the production of the book will remain the same. You will keep submitting your own and other bloggers’ work via the same submission form. I will keep posting the growing list of submissions every Monday morning.

At the end of the year, some time in December, we’ll close the submission form as we always do. Jennifer will devise the judging methodology and will ask a group of bloggers, writers and scientists to serves as judges, to help us go through hundreds of entries at a fast pace. Thus the crowdsourced, community aspects of the book will remain intact.

Once the final decisions have been made and 50 essays, one cartoon and one poem are chosen for the inclusion in the book, Jennifer, Amanda and I will work closely with the authors to edit, copyedit and proofread the entries until they are in a perfectly publishable form (but without losing the webby ‘feel’). Then the project will get turned over to the professionals for design, typesetting and marketing – the aspects of publishing that were always the hardest for us to do as amateurs until now. Also, though Open Laboratory is a brand in our small circles (and quite popular there – see #openlab hashtag on Twitter), we may need to change its name to something more broadly marketable – but that is far from final yet, more information to come later.

This process lasts a little bit longer when done professionally, so we expect the book not to get published early in the year as before, but rather in early Fall, perhaps September, just before people start shopping for the holidays.

It took five years to find the publisher for this project, and it has finally happened, mainly due to continuous and strong support of the community – yes, that’s you. And I should not forget to mention the help of people most closely involved in the project over the years – the past Guest Editors Reed Cartwright, Jenny Rohn, Scicurious and Jason G. Goldman, the LaTeX guru Blake Stacey and, person without whom this idea would not have even been hatched – Anton Zuiker.

I am very, very happy with these developments and am looking forward to working on it over the next year, and hopefully into the future.

The Open Laboratory 2010 – now up for sale!

You kept submitting your posts all year long and watching, every Monday, to see which other posts were also entered.

Then we closed the submission form.

Then we made you wait a month of “electoral silence” while the judges went through three rounds of judging, until we finally announced which 50 essays, plus poems and cartoons, made it into print.

Then we announced the gorgeous new cover art.

New guest editor? Soon, be patient…

But now – what you have been waiting for so long – The Open Laboratory 2010, the collection of best writing on science blog for the year, is finally up for sale!

Buy one for yourself, one for your significant other, one for each family member, one for each pet (including all those on the internet who are dogs but we don’t know they are, and of course all the LOLcats), one each for as many neighbors, friends and colleagues you can think of, and a copy for the local library ;-)

Thank you Jason Goldman for a fantastic job ushering this project through all year round, to Andrea Kuszewski for the cover design, and to Blake Stacey for doing all the technical stuff with LaTeX and formatting and such. Thank you to all the judges who read hundreds of posts. And thank you to all of you for submitting your posts, spreading the word about the project and supporting it throughout the years.

Open Laboratory 2011 – open for submissions

Jason and Blake were both at ScienceOnline2011 so had more important things to do for a few days. But now they are back, finalizing the Open Laboratory 2010. A couple of more hard-to-get bloggers to chase down, and we’re ready for production and publishing. Another week or two…and the book will be out.

There may be some changes in the way we do Open Laboratory in the future, so I am holding off, for now, on announcing the next year’s Editor. More information later….

In the meantime, you can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here. The instructions for submitting are here.

And, most importantly, you can now start submitting your posts (and other people’s posts) for the next edition. The submission form for the 2011 edition of Open Lab is now open. Any blog post written since December 1, 2010 is eligible for submission.

Just two months into it, it should not be hard to go back into your archives and submit your recent posts now – when next November comes you’ll hardly remember them ;-)

And once you are done submitting your own posts, you can start looking at the others’, including on aggregators like ScienceSeeker, Scienceblogging.org and Researchblogging.org.

Here are the submission badges, designed again this year by Doctor Zen. You are encouraged to display them prominently on your websites and blogs:

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://coturnix.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/open_lab_2011_150x100.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://coturnix.files.wordpress.com/2011/01/open_lab_2011_300x200.png”&gt</a&gt

Or take the Open Lab 2011 submission bookmarkletOpen Lab – and drag it to your browser’s toolbar to have it always handy as you browse around science blogs.

And now…. the brand new Open Lab cover!

Designed this year by Andrea Kuszewski!

Open Laboratory 2010 – is your post in it?

You can now see for yourself! The 50 essays (plus 6 poems and 1 cartoon) have been chosen by a large and energetic panel of judges.

I will give the honors to Jason – go to his blog post announcing and linking to all the winning entries to see for yourself. Jason deserves all the traffic and accolades – he worked hard, was efficient and diligent…and he is such a softie! I think he cried about 850 times over the past month as all but the 50 out of 900 entries had to, one by one, get eliminated….

Congrats to all the winners – Jason will be in touch with you shortly about editing and formatting the final version.

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions now closed – see all the entries

And it is over! The submission deadline has just passed. No more submissions will be accepted for the 2010 edition of the Open Laboratory.

Jason has lined up an impressive list of judges who will immediately start receiving their first judging lists and will start the complex process of winnowing down almost 900 entries into the final 50 essays/stories, one poem, one piece of art (for the cover) and one cartoon/comic strip. As usual, the book will be published with Lulu.com and we’ll try to have the book ready roughly in time for ScienceOnline2011 (we always say that, I know, but this time we’ll really try hard!)

In the meantime, while this process is ongoing, you can use this post, this collection almost 900 links, as a summary of the year, a sample and a cross-section of the best that happened on science blogs over the past twelve months. A snapshot of history! Quite a collection!

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – the final stretch!

The deadline is November 30th, 2011 at midnight (Pacific time) so you have about one and a half days to dig through your (or other people’s) blog archives including all the way back to December 1st 2009 and pick your best essays, stories, poems, comic strips, cartoons and original art you produced since then.

The Submission form is here.

Under the fold are entries so far. The instructions for submitting are here. You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries
Continue reading

It’s getting hot – submissions for Open Laboratory 2011 are flying in by the dozens per hour… how about you?

The deadline is November 30th, 2011 at midnight (Pacific time) so you have about two and a half days to dig through your (or other people’s) blog archives including all the way back to December 1st 2009 and pick your best essays, stories, poems, comic strips, cartoons and original art you produced since then.

The Submission form is here.

Under the fold are entries so far. The instructions for submitting are here. You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries
Continue reading

Only three days to go – Open Laboratory final stretch for submissions!

It is getting really close! Yes, we have more than 700 entries….but are yours among them? This will all close in three days, at midnight (OK, Pacific Time, so three extra hours) November 30th, so hurry up!

Don’t forget that along with essays and stories, we are also looking for other stuff, so if you have a poem, a cartoon/comic strip or original art, we’d like to see that as well.

Jason and the judges are ready!

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries
Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – only eight days till the deadline!

There is only a week left for submissions! Dig through your archives, through other people’s archives and submit! Jason has started to contact potential judges for this year’s anthology. We’re ready to roll!

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – two weeks to go!

There are only tho weeks left for submission! Dig through your archives, through other people’s archives and submit! Jason has started to contact potential judges for this year’s anthology. We’re ready to roll!

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – three weeks to go!

There is only Three weeks left for submissions! Dig through your archives, through other people’s archives and submit! Jason has started to contact potential judges for this year’s anthology. We’re ready to roll!

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.
Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – one month left to submit!

There is only one month left for submissions! Dig through your archives, through other people’s archives and submit! Jason has started to contact potential judges for this year’s anthology. We’re ready to roll!

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions to date

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Note: if you have recently moved your blog, please e-mail me the corrected URLs for your entries

Continue reading

Open Laboratory ’10 – announcement: new Editor

We are running a baton race this year, I think ;-)

Anyway, Ben Young Landis got a great new job and is moving to California and will be busy getting started there, so he had to bow out of the Year’s Editor role (at least for this year!). Not a problem at all – there is already a new Editor in place.

Welcome Jason G. Goldman of The Thoughtful Animal blog. As he explains in his post he will be the one steering the ship this year. Thank you, Jason, so much for jumping in so fast in an emergency.

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

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A Blog Around The Clock: What does it mean that a nation is ‘Unscientific’?
A Blog Around The Clock: My latest scientific paper: Extended Laying Interval of Ultimate Eggs of the Eastern Bluebird
A Blog Around The Clock: Evolutionary Medicine: Does reindeer have a circadian stop-watch instead of a clock?

A Hot Cup of Joe: About Cognitive Archaeology
A Hot Cup of Joe: Application of Cognitive Archaeology

A Meandering Scholar: Back to basics: The Evolution of a Postdoc

A Wonderful Day for Anthropology: Sexual Dimorphism in Human Breasts: An Examination of Three Evolutionary Perspectives

Anna’s Bones: The Ape That Wouldn’t Grow Up

The Anthropology of Everyday Life: Step Right Up and Give Us Your DNA
The Anthropology of Everyday Life: The Angels are Flying
The Anthropology of Everyday Life: Dancing by the Nile, Ladies Loved His Style….
If The Shoe Fits

Anthropology in Practice: The Irish Diaspora: Why Even Trinidadians Are a Little Irish
Anthropology in Practice: RSVP–A Cultural Construct?
Anthropology in Practice: Death 2.0: Digital Mourning
Anthropology in Practice: Is Your Time My Time? Deconstructing “Social” Time (2)
Anthropology in Practice: Dealing With ‘Digital Distractions’ in the Classroom
Anthropology in Practice: Extra! Extra! (Some) Print Media Is Not Dead!
Anthropology in Practice: Bullying and Emotional Intelligence on the Web
Anthropology in Practice: Standardized Time and Power Relations

Archy: Mammoths, floods, and whatnot

Back Re(action): To whom it may concern (poem)
Back Re(action): What is a scientific prediction?

Bad Science: Is it okay to ignore results from people you don’t trust?

Bjoern Brembs Blog: In which potatoes in France are like high-ranking journals in science

The Black Hole: Say NO to the Second Post Doc!
The Black Hole: Devils of Details: Getting Scientists to Understand How Policy Making Works
The Black Hole: Two heads are better than one: Making a case for jointly run labs

Blag Hag: In the name of science, I offer my boobs and A quick clarification about Boobquake and Head of Iran’s Guardian Council supports Sedighi’s earthquake hypothesis and And the boobquake experiment has begun…, And the Boobquake results are in!, Why boobquake isn’t destroying feminism and The Iranian and Muslim response to Boobquake collected and edited as a single entry.

Built On Facts: The Theory of Theory

Byte Size Biology: Highly Evolved
Byte Size Biology: Well, color me surprised
Byte Size Biology: Obesity: the Role of the Immune System
Byte Size Biology: Comparative Functional Genomics: Penguin vs. Bacterium
Byte Size Biology: Protein function, promiscuity, moonlighting and philosophy

Canadian GirlPostdoc in America: Dissent gets a fat lip.
Canadian GirlPostdoc in America: Slow Science Gets the Shaft – Part Deux

Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Crispy on the Outside (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Molecules of Song (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Cryosat-2, Orbital Mosquito Hunter (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Now You See It… (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Military Objective (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Avoiding the Sugar Buzz (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: 2010 GA6, Space Yacht (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Gut Instinct (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: The Search For Night Life (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Unruffled Tuxedos (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Her Sense of Timing (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Watching Their Backs (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Disorienteering (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Floral Rearrangement (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: In Development (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Power Plant (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Breathless Find (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Eyjafjallajökull (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: A Grain of Exposure (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: A Project With Teeth (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: A Head For Fashion (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Equatorial Engine (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Inherited Hunger (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Going the Distance (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Manipulations (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Current Events (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Pattern Masters (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Shutter Bug (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Rules of Virtual Engagement (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Reflections on 24-Themis (poem)

CMBR: Flu shots all around! But is it the best way?
CMBR: Attn: Science journalists. It’s time to break the mold.

Code For Life: Book sales, frumpy readers, and mental rotation of book titles

Computing Intelligence: Sloppy Language in Science on Human Uniqueness

Confessions of a (former) Lab Rat: On Peer Review

CultureLab: Celebrating the real Einstein

Culturing Science: Octopuses doing tricks on the internet and our search for non-human ‘intelligence’

Darryl Cunningham Investigates: The Facts In The Case Of Dr. Andrew Wakefield (comic strip)

Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Branch Lengths and Species

The Digital Cuttlefish: A Batty Problem (poem)

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Discovery Institute needs a dictionary

Dot Earth: My Second Half

Dot Physics: MythBusters’ energy explanation

Dr. Carin Bondar…biologist with a twist: Darwin’s ‘Survival of the Fittest’ meets the irresponsible Homo sapiens
Dr. Carin Bondar…biologist with a twist: Chemical Espionage, Anti-Aphrodisiacs and Hitchhiking…all in a Day’s Work for a Parasitoid Wasp!

Dr. Kaku’s Universe: The Bizarre and Wonderful World of Quantum Theory–And How Understanding It Has Ultimately Changed Our Lives

Endless Forms: Crown Jewel of Biodiversity on the Edge
Endless Forms: Saving face: Salamanders show why it’s important to know thy enemies
Endless Forms: Boozing Treeshrews: Heavyweight drinkers in small packages

Ever Wondered? (Scienceline): How Does a Venus Flytrap Work?

Freethinker’s Asylum: Alpha, Beta, and Power

Genetic Maize: GMOs Could Render Important Antibiotics Worthless

Greg Laden: Are you are real skeptic, or are you just faithing it?

hgg: Anthology of science writing: now almost 4 % with ovaries!

ICBS Everywhere: Fun Does Not Sell Smarts
ICBS Everywhere: BS for George Takei Fans and Consumers
ICBS Everywhere: There Must Be an Idiom
ICBS Everywhere: Narcissism + Incompetence = Ignorance and More Incompetence

Ionian Enchantment: Anecdotes as evidence
Ionian Enchantment: The Cost of Truth is Eternal Vigilance

Laelaps: Off the prehistoric coast of Panama, a mega-toothed shark nursery

The Language of Bad Physics: The Language of Science – it’s ‘just a theory’
The Language of Bad Physics: Experiments in Non-Relativistic Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND)

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Made for Each Other: Evolution of Monogamy in Poison Frogs
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): UV, You See? Black Light Reveals Secrets in Fossils
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Fly Me to the Moon: The Incredible Migratory Journey of the Arctic Tern
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Darwin’s Finches Develop Immunity to Alien Parasites
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Is That A T. rex Up Your Nose? New Species of Nose-dwelling Leech Discovered
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): (How) Are Birds Affected by Volcanic Ash?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): How Will You Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): What do Great Tits Reveal about the Genetics of Personality?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Racehorse Research Identifies Speed Gene
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Fossil Feather Colors Really ARE Written In Stone
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Fetid Fish Revise Understanding of Fossil Formation
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Oiled SeaBirds: To Kill Or Not To Kill? What Is The Ethical Thing To Do?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Newly Described Bird-like Dinosaur Predates Archaeopteryx by 15-20 Million Years
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Gulf Oil Spill Disaster: Spawn of the Living Dead for Atlantic Bluefin Tuna?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Ancient DNA from Fossil Eggshells May Provide Clues to Eggstinction of Giant Birds
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Orange Stripey Dinosaurs? Fossil Feathers Reveal Their Secret Colors
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Migratory Monarch Butterflies ‘See’ Earth’s GeoMagnetic Field
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Colorful Tits Produce Speedier Sperm
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Doing It For the Kids: The Evolution of Migration
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Distressed Ravens Show That Empathy Is For The Birds, Too

The Loom: Skull Caps and Genomes

Maniraptora: Tastes Like Chicken: Size Matters — Bigger is Better, Even for Male Pipefish
Maniraptora: Tastes Like Chicken: Gender-Bending Chickens: Mixed, Not Scrambled

The Martian Chronicles: How to cure the Avatar Blues

Mauka to Makai: Barnacle Sex

Maxwell’s Demon: Spirographs and the third dimension
Maxwell’s Demon: The Laws of Gelada (How to be a grad student)

Medical & Bio-Inspired Innovations: Blood Pressure, Medication, Diet, And Dementia: What The Recent Research Tells Us

Mental indigestion: Your microbiome and you (part I): Gut
Mental indigestion: The grass isn’t always greener…

Mind the Gap: In which I dream of revolution

Mr Science Show: For a healthy relationship, men should be ugly and rich, women pretty and mixed-race
Mr Science Show: Correlation of the Week: Liberals and Atheists Are More Intelligent
Mr Science Show: How do you spell goal?

Neurotopia: Attractiveness, anger, and warrior princess blondes
Neurotopia: A Letter to a Grad Student
Neurotopia: Friday Weird Science: Why does asparagus make your pee smell?
Neurotopia: On Animal Research

Nutrition Wonderland: The Truth About Organic Farming
Nutrition Wonderland: Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

Observations of a Nerd: Evolution: The Curious Case of Dogs
Observations of a Nerd: Psych FAIL
Observations of a Nerd: Evolution: Watching Speciation Occur
Observations of a Nerd: Ancient Sex Scandals: Did We Get It On With Neandertals?
Observations of a Nerd: Reflections on the Gulf Oil Spill – Conversations With My Grandpa
Observations of a Nerd: Tuna

Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Laboratory Life
Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Evolving Sexual Tensions
Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Divide and Diminish
Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Enter the Chronotherapists

Oscillator: Knowledge is Power and Biology is Power, perhaps fused into a single essay.

Pharyngula: How to make a snake

PodBlack Cat: Presenting, Minorities And The Token Skeptic At #AtheistCon

Poseidon Sciences: The Agony and the Ecstasy: Why science writing is like learning tango and Chinese brush painting

Prof-Like Substance: Can I get a Land’s End catalog, STAT?

Promega Connections: How do I Describe Thee? Let Me Count the Ways
Promega Connections: Mate Selection at Frog Cocktail Parties: Keep it Short, Low, Loud, and Stand Out from the Crowd (Oh, and have a colorful vocal sac, too)

Reciprocal Space: I have discovered Jupiter
Reciprocal Space: Judgement Days

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Extracting the stopper.

Rennie’s Last Nerve: Blood Simple: Mammoths, mice, malaria and hemoglobin
Rennie’s Last Nerve: Energetically Batty

Respectful Insolence: When what an acupuncture study shows is much more interesting than what acupuncture believers think it shows

Sandwalk: On the Origin of the Double Membrane in Mitochondria and Chloroplasts

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal: Epistemological Anarchists (comic/cartoon)

Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week: Lies, damned lies, and Clash of the Dinosaurs

Save Your Breath For Running Ponies: Your Friends Aren’t Just Going To Forget You Envenomated Them, Sinornithosaurus.
Save Your Breath For Running Ponies: You Should Probably Just Move Oceans, Male Gulf Pipefish

Sciencebase: Whatever happened to the audiophile

Science in Seconds: Africa’s Next Top Hominid

Science In The Triangle (DeLene Beeland): Hibernation devastation: White-nose syndrome and our bats

Science Progress: Ecosystems In the Age of Cassandra

The Science Talent Project: Happy song scientists and sad song scientists

The Scientist: On Public Relations

Skeptic Wonder: Social onycophorans!

Skulls in the Stars: Perpetual motion — nonsense for over 100 years
Skulls in the Stars: Rolling out the (optical) carpet: the Talbot effect
Skulls in the Stars: Mythbusters were scooped — by 130 years! (Archimedes death ray)
Skulls in the Stars: Singular Optics: Light chasing its own tail
Skulls in the Stars: Shocking: Michael Faraday does biology! (1839)
Skulls in the Stars: Invisibility physics: Kerker’s ‘invisible bodies’

Southern Fried Scientist: The Data Speak
Southern Fried Scientist: Tournament marlins get bigger?
Southern Fried Scientist: Oil Spill vs. Hypoxic Zone
Southern Fried Scientist: Louis Agassiz and a brief history of early United States marine biology

Terra Sigillatta: Marking the magnificient memory of Henrietta Lacks

Testimony of the spade: Surveys on my mind
Testimony of the spade: Door to Door

Tetrapod Zoology: Testing the flotation dynamics and swimming abilities of giraffes by way of computational analysis

There and (hopefully) back again…: Everyday (lab) living

The Thoughtful Animal: Snakes on a Muppethugging Plane! (Monday Pets)

Through the Sandglass: Life and art, sand and glass: the wonders of Difflugia

UCAR Magazine: Brrr: The AO is way low

Uncertain Principles: Science Is More Like Sumo Than Soccer

Water Numbers: Peter Gleick at SFGate.com: The best argument against global warming

wet: Save the Whale Poop

Wild Muse: Social networks, and social animals
Wild Muse: Wolf recovery vs. ecosystem health
Wild Muse: Givin’ props to hybrids

WooFighters: My Inspiration for Woo Fighters

Help us spread the word by embedding these buttons on your blogs and websites – clicking on them takes you to the submission form:

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010%20button100x67.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010_150x100_b.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010_300x200_b.png”&gt</a&gt

Or take the Open Lab 2010 submission bookmarkletOpen Lab – and drag it to your browser’s toolbar to have it always handy.

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

============================

A Blog Around The Clock: What does it mean that a nation is ‘Unscientific’?
A Blog Around The Clock: My latest scientific paper: Extended Laying Interval of Ultimate Eggs of the Eastern Bluebird
A Blog Around The Clock: Evolutionary Medicine: Does reindeer have a circadian stop-watch instead of a clock?

A Hot Cup of Joe: About Cognitive Archaeology
A Hot Cup of Joe: Application of Cognitive Archaeology

A Meandering Scholar: Back to basics: The Evolution of a Postdoc

A Wonderful Day for Anthropology: Sexual Dimorphism in Human Breasts: An Examination of Three Evolutionary Perspectives

Anna’s Bones: The Ape That Wouldn’t Grow Up

The Anthropology of Everyday Life: Step Right Up and Give Us Your DNA
The Anthropology of Everyday Life: The Angels are Flying
The Anthropology of Everyday Life: Dancing by the Nile, Ladies Loved His Style….

Anthropology in Practice: The Irish Diaspora: Why Even Trinidadians Are a Little Irish
Anthropology in Practice: RSVP–A Cultural Construct?
Anthropology in Practice: Death 2.0: Digital Mourning
Anthropology in Practice: Is Your Time My Time? Deconstructing “Social” Time (2)
Anthropology in Practice: Dealing With ‘Digital Distractions’ in the Classroom
Anthropology in Practice: Extra! Extra! (Some) Print Media Is Not Dead!
Anthropology in Practice: Bullying and Emotional Intelligence on the Web
Anthropology in Practice: Standardized Time and Power Relations

Archy: Mammoths, floods, and whatnot

Back Re(action): To whom it may concern (poem)
Back Re(action): What is a scientific prediction?

Bad Science: Is it okay to ignore results from people you don’t trust?

Bjoern Brembs Blog: In which potatoes in France are like high-ranking journals in science

The Black Hole: Say NO to the Second Post Doc!
The Black Hole: Devils of Details: Getting Scientists to Understand How Policy Making Works
The Black Hole: Two heads are better than one: Making a case for jointly run labs

Blag Hag: In the name of science, I offer my boobs and A quick clarification about Boobquake and Head of Iran’s Guardian Council supports Sedighi’s earthquake hypothesis and And the boobquake experiment has begun…, And the Boobquake results are in!, Why boobquake isn’t destroying feminism and The Iranian and Muslim response to Boobquake collected and edited as a single entry.

Built On Facts: The Theory of Theory

Byte Size Biology: Highly Evolved
Byte Size Biology: Well, color me surprised
Byte Size Biology: Obesity: the Role of the Immune System
Byte Size Biology: Comparative Functional Genomics: Penguin vs. Bacterium
Byte Size Biology: Protein function, promiscuity, moonlighting and philosophy

Canadian GirlPostdoc in America: Dissent gets a fat lip.
Canadian GirlPostdoc in America: Slow Science Gets the Shaft – Part Deux

Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Crispy on the Outside (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Molecules of Song (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Cryosat-2, Orbital Mosquito Hunter (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Now You See It… (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Military Objective (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Avoiding the Sugar Buzz (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: 2010 GA6, Space Yacht (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Gut Instinct (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: The Search For Night Life (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Unruffled Tuxedos (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Her Sense of Timing (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Watching Their Backs (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Disorienteering (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Floral Rearrangement (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: In Development (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Power Plant (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Breathless Find (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Eyjafjallajökull (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: A Grain of Exposure (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: A Project With Teeth (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: A Head For Fashion (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Equatorial Engine (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Inherited Hunger (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Going the Distance (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Manipulations (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Current Events (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Pattern Masters (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Shutter Bug (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Rules of Virtual Engagement (poem)
Chronicles From Hurricane Country: Reflections on 24-Themis (poem)

CMBR: Flu shots all around! But is it the best way?
CMBR: Attn: Science journalists. It’s time to break the mold.

Code For Life: Book sales, frumpy readers, and mental rotation of book titles

Computing Intelligence: Sloppy Language in Science on Human Uniqueness

Confessions of a (former) Lab Rat: On Peer Review

CultureLab: Celebrating the real Einstein

Culturing Science: Octopuses doing tricks on the internet and our search for non-human ‘intelligence’

Darryl Cunningham Investigates: The Facts In The Case Of Dr. Andrew Wakefield (comic strip)

Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Branch Lengths and Species

The Digital Cuttlefish: A Batty Problem (poem)

The Dispersal of Darwin: The Discovery Institute needs a dictionary

Dot Earth: My Second Half

Dot Physics: MythBusters’ energy explanation

Dr. Carin Bondar…biologist with a twist: Darwin’s ‘Survival of the Fittest’ meets the irresponsible Homo sapiens
Dr. Carin Bondar…biologist with a twist: Chemical Espionage, Anti-Aphrodisiacs and Hitchhiking…all in a Day’s Work for a Parasitoid Wasp!

Dr. Kaku’s Universe: The Bizarre and Wonderful World of Quantum Theory–And How Understanding It Has Ultimately Changed Our Lives

Endless Forms: Crown Jewel of Biodiversity on the Edge
Endless Forms: Saving face: Salamanders show why it’s important to know thy enemies
Endless Forms: Boozing Treeshrews: Heavyweight drinkers in small packages

Ever Wondered? (Scienceline): How Does a Venus Flytrap Work?

Freethinker’s Asylum: Alpha, Beta, and Power

Genetic Maize: GMOs Could Render Important Antibiotics Worthless

Greg Laden: Are you are real skeptic, or are you just faithing it?

hgg: Anthology of science writing: now almost 4 % with ovaries!

ICBS Everywhere: Fun Does Not Sell Smarts
ICBS Everywhere: BS for George Takei Fans and Consumers
ICBS Everywhere: There Must Be an Idiom
ICBS Everywhere: Narcissism + Incompetence = Ignorance and More Incompetence

Ionian Enchantment: Anecdotes as evidence

Laelaps: Off the prehistoric coast of Panama, a mega-toothed shark nursery

The Language of Bad Physics: The Language of Science – it’s ‘just a theory’
The Language of Bad Physics: Experiments in Non-Relativistic Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND)

Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Made for Each Other: Evolution of Monogamy in Poison Frogs
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): UV, You See? Black Light Reveals Secrets in Fossils
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Fly Me to the Moon: The Incredible Migratory Journey of the Arctic Tern
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Darwin’s Finches Develop Immunity to Alien Parasites
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Is That A T. rex Up Your Nose? New Species of Nose-dwelling Leech Discovered
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): (How) Are Birds Affected by Volcanic Ash?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): How Will You Celebrate International Migratory Bird Day?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): What do Great Tits Reveal about the Genetics of Personality?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Racehorse Research Identifies Speed Gene
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Fossil Feather Colors Really ARE Written In Stone
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Fetid Fish Revise Understanding of Fossil Formation
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Oiled SeaBirds: To Kill Or Not To Kill? What Is The Ethical Thing To Do?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Newly Described Bird-like Dinosaur Predates Archaeopteryx by 15-20 Million Years
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Gulf Oil Spill Disaster: Spawn of the Living Dead for Atlantic Bluefin Tuna?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Ancient DNA from Fossil Eggshells May Provide Clues to Eggstinction of Giant Birds
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Orange Stripey Dinosaurs? Fossil Feathers Reveal Their Secret Colors
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Migratory Monarch Butterflies ‘See’ Earth’s GeoMagnetic Field
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Colorful Tits Produce Speedier Sperm
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Doing It For the Kids: The Evolution of Migration
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Distressed Ravens Show That Empathy Is For The Birds, Too

The Loom: Skull Caps and Genomes

Maniraptora: Tastes Like Chicken: Size Matters — Bigger is Better, Even for Male Pipefish
Maniraptora: Tastes Like Chicken: Gender-Bending Chickens: Mixed, Not Scrambled

Mauka to Makai: Barnacle Sex

Maxwell’s Demon: Spirographs and the third dimension
Maxwell’s Demon: The Laws of Gelada (How to be a grad student)

Medical & Bio-Inspired Innovations: Blood Pressure, Medication, Diet, And Dementia: What The Recent Research Tells Us

Mental indigestion: Your microbiome and you (part I): Gut
Mental indigestion: The grass isn’t always greener…

Mind the Gap: In which I dream of revolution

Mr Science Show: For a healthy relationship, men should be ugly and rich, women pretty and mixed-race
Mr Science Show: Correlation of the Week: Liberals and Atheists Are More Intelligent
Mr Science Show: How do you spell goal?

Neurotopia: Attractiveness, anger, and warrior princess blondes
Neurotopia: A Letter to a Grad Student
Neurotopia: Friday Weird Science: Why does asparagus make your pee smell?
Neurotopia: On Animal Research

Nutrition Wonderland: The Truth About Organic Farming
Nutrition Wonderland: Understanding Our Bodies: Insulin

Observations of a Nerd: Evolution: The Curious Case of Dogs
Observations of a Nerd: Psych FAIL
Observations of a Nerd: Evolution: Watching Speciation Occur
Observations of a Nerd: Ancient Sex Scandals: Did We Get It On With Neandertals?
Observations of a Nerd: Reflections on the Gulf Oil Spill – Conversations With My Grandpa
Observations of a Nerd: Tuna

Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Laboratory Life
Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Evolving Sexual Tensions
Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Divide and Diminish
Opinionator (Olivia Judson): Enter the Chronotherapists

Oscillator: Knowledge is Power and Biology is Power, perhaps fused into a single essay.

Pharyngula: How to make a snake

PodBlack Cat: Presenting, Minorities And The Token Skeptic At #AtheistCon

Poseidon Sciences: The Agony and the Ecstasy: Why science writing is like learning tango and Chinese brush painting

Prof-Like Substance: Can I get a Land’s End catalog, STAT?

Promega Connections: How do I Describe Thee? Let Me Count the Ways
Promega Connections: Mate Selection at Frog Cocktail Parties: Keep it Short, Low, Loud, and Stand Out from the Crowd (Oh, and have a colorful vocal sac, too)

Reciprocal Space: I have discovered Jupiter
Reciprocal Space: Judgement Days

The Renaissance Mathematicus: Extracting the stopper.

Rennie’s Last Nerve: Blood Simple: Mammoths, mice, malaria and hemoglobin
Rennie’s Last Nerve: Energetically Batty

Respectful Insolence: When what an acupuncture study shows is much more interesting than what acupuncture believers think it shows

Sandwalk: On the Origin of the Double Membrane in Mitochondria and Chloroplasts

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal: Epistemological Anarchists (comic/cartoon)

Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week: Lies, damned lies, and Clash of the Dinosaurs

Save Your Breath For Running Ponies: Your Friends Aren’t Just Going To Forget You Envenomated Them, Sinornithosaurus.
Save Your Breath For Running Ponies: You Should Probably Just Move Oceans, Male Gulf Pipefish

Sciencebase: Whatever happened to the audiophile

Science in Seconds: Africa’s Next Top Hominid

Science In The Triangle (DeLene Beeland): Hibernation devastation: White-nose syndrome and our bats

Science Progress: Ecosystems In the Age of Cassandra

The Science Talent Project: Happy song scientists and sad song scientists

The Scientist: On Public Relations

Skeptic Wonder: Social onycophorans!

Skulls in the Stars: Perpetual motion — nonsense for over 100 years
Skulls in the Stars: Rolling out the (optical) carpet: the Talbot effect
Skulls in the Stars: Mythbusters were scooped — by 130 years! (Archimedes death ray)
Skulls in the Stars: Singular Optics: Light chasing its own tail
Skulls in the Stars: Shocking: Michael Faraday does biology! (1839)
Skulls in the Stars: Invisibility physics: Kerker’s ‘invisible bodies’

Southern Fried Scientist: The Data Speak
Southern Fried Scientist: Tournament marlins get bigger?
Southern Fried Scientist: Oil Spill vs. Hypoxic Zone
Southern Fried Scientist: Louis Agassiz and a brief history of early United States marine biology

Terra Sigillatta: Marking the magnificient memory of Henrietta Lacks

Tetrapod Zoology: Testing the flotation dynamics and swimming abilities of giraffes by way of computational analysis

There and (hopefully) back again…: Everyday (lab) living

The Thoughtful Animal: Snakes on a Muppethugging Plane! (Monday Pets)

Through the Sandglass: Life and art, sand and glass: the wonders of Difflugia

UCAR Magazine: Brrr: The AO is way low

Uncertain Principles: Science Is More Like Sumo Than Soccer

Water Numbers: Peter Gleick at SFGate.com: The best argument against global warming

wet: Save the Whale Poop

Wild Muse: Social networks, and social animals
Wild Muse: Wolf recovery vs. ecosystem health
Wild Muse: Givin’ props to hybrids

WooFighters: My Inspiration for Woo Fighters

====================

Help us spread the word by embedding these buttons on your blogs and websites – clicking on them takes you to the submission form:

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010%20button100x67.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010_150x100_b.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010_300x200_b.png”&gt</a&gt

Or take the Open Lab 2010 submission bookmarkletOpen Lab – and drag it to your browser’s toolbar to have it always handy.

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.
You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.
You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.
You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.
You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.
You can buy the last four annual collections here. You can read Prefaces and Introductions to older editions here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is growing fast – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The list is slowly growing – check the submissions to date and get inspired to submit something of your own – an essay, a poem, a cartoon or original art.
The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Last week Ben Young Landis, the 2010 editor, and I had a great first meeting about Open Lab and how we are going to do the whole thing this year. In the meantime, dig through your archives or the archives of other blogs you like and submit the best posts.
The Submission form is here. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory – old Prefaces and Introductions

One difference between reading Open Laboratory anthologies and reading the original posts included in them is that the printed versions are slightly edited and polished. Another difference is that the Prefaces and Introductions can be found only in the books. They have never been placed online.
But now that four books are out and we are halfway through collecting entries for the fifth one, when only the 2009 book is still selling, I think it is perfectly OK to place Prefaces and Introductions that I wrote myself online. I wrote Prefaces for the 2006, 2007 and 2008 book, as well as the Introduction for the 2006 one. The introductions for the subsequent editions were written by the year’s guest editor, i.e., Reed Cartwright in 2007, Jennifer Rohn in 2008, and SciCurious in 2009.
So, under the fold are my three Prefaces and one Introduction. See how the world (and my understanding of it) of the online science communication has changed over the last few years:

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

The Submission form is here so you can get started. Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here and here is the Submission form so you can get started.

Continue reading

Open Laboratory 2010 – submissions so far

Under the fold are entries so far, as well as buttons and the bookmarklet. The instructions for submitting are here.

Continue reading

Another Open Laboratory 2009 review

David Bradley read the book and liked it.
Perhaps you’ll like it, too. If you use the code “SHOWERS” in April during check-out you will get 10% off. Just go here right now and click on “Buy now” ;-)
Under the fold – OpenLab2010 entries so far, and the submission buttons:

Continue reading

Introducing the Open Laboratory 2010 editor

Editing the 2006 anthology of the best writing on science blogs was a fast, whirlwind affair – with a little help from my friends, I put it together (yes, from idea to having the book up for sale) in less than a month. As it was quite a success and I expected the number of entries to double (I was right about that), I decided to invite each year a different person – a blogger and a friend – to act as guest editor. Thus, the 2007 book was edited by Reed Cartwright, the 2008 one by Jennifer Rohn and the 2009 book by SciCurious.
I am sure you are all waiting with baited breath for me to announce the editor of the 2010 edition, the person who will design the judging method, invite judges, organize the Table Of Contents, make decisions about the design and ‘look’ of the book deal with everything else that may pop up during the process. We’ll work together on making the next book better than ever.
The Open Laboratory 2010 editor will be….

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The ‘submit to Open Laboratory 2010′ buttons are here!

Thanks, this year again, to Zen Faulkes for putting together the submission buttons that you can embed wherever you want on your sites and thus have easy way to submit an entry for Open Laboratory 2010 whenever you read a cool science post.
You should read the long-winded instructions about what is and isn’t appropriate to submit, deadline, and other pertinent information.
And you should certainly buy (or tell your friends, colleagues, family and neighbors to buy) the 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 editions. Especially if you buy in April – we have entered the anthology into the April contest at Lulu.com – use the code “SHOWERS” during check-out to get 10% off.
Now, here are the codes – just copy and paste into your site’s templates:
<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010%20button100x67.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010_150x100_b.png”&gt</a&gt

<a href=”http://openlab.wufoo.com/forms/submission-form/”&gt<img src=”http://scienceblogs.com/clock/Open_Lab_2010_300x200_b.png”&gt</a&gt

Under the fold are submissions so far:

Continue reading

You can now start submitting your blog posts for the Open Laboratory 2010

Now that the 2009 edition of Open Laboratory, the fourth annual anthology of the best writing on science blogs, is out and getting the first (very positive!) reviews on blog and in the media, it’s time to start looking ahead at the next year.
Yesterday I cleaned up the submission form, made the necessary edits, and opened it up – please go to the new Submission Form and start entering the posts you consider worthy of publishing in the book.
Each entry needs to be originally published as a blog post between December 1st 2009 and December 1st 2010 to be eligible.
You can nominate as many entries as you wish, written by you or by others.
Historically, about half of the submissions are nominated by readers and the other half by authors – there is no shame in self-promotion. Nobody knows your archives as well as you do, so dig through them, back to December 1st of last year, and pick a post or two to submit right now. Then, as the year progresses and you post more good stuff, come back and submit more.
History also shows that the number of entries you submit has no relation to your chances of getting picked. If your writing is good, a single submitted post has a chance. If it sucks, submitting 50 entries will not help (may actually bore the judges to death until they actively hate you for making them work so hard in an unlikely chance of picking something from that avalanche of posts).
Remember that this is going to be a book – printed on paper derived from dead trees, with black&white or grayscale images only. Until eReaders get really good at that and totally ubiqutous, audio and video files just don’t work on paper, so posts that rely heavily on those will not make it. Hyperlinks also do not work well on paper, so if your post relies on a number of external links, chances of that post getting printed are miniscule to zero (unless you can show how it can be edited and still be good). Can your post still be good if you eliminate pictures you don’t have copyright on? Or if you turn color images into grayscale? Go ahead, otherwise don”t bother – can’t be done. When judges sift through several hundreds of submissions in order to pick 52, posts that require lots of editing to make them fit for print are easy to cut out of the running. There is no reason not to edit a non-print-friendly post and repost it in a more print-friendly format before submitting it. In the end, if your entry gets into the final 52, you will be asked to do some editing anyway, and we may do some editing for you on top of that.
Bear in mind that one of the 52 posts that makes it into the book will be an original cartoon or comic strip. Also bear in mind that another one of the 52 posts that makes it into the book will be an original poem. And you are also encouraged to submit original art – if we are floored by it, we may decide to put it on the cover. The other 50 posts will be essays of different lengths, forms, formats, styles and voices, on 50 different topics, displaying the diversity, creativity and quality of writing in the science blogosphere.
If you also write for a magazine or newspaper as well as on a blog (independent blog or a blog hosted by a magazine/newspaper), please submit your blog posts and not your magazine/newspaper pieces. It does not matter if you are paid or not, but use this rule of thumb: if you posted out of your volition, on a topic you wanted to write about, it’s fine. If you wrote something because an editor asked you to, and this was subsequently edited and showed up on the main magazine/newspaper site online (and perhaps even in print), then it should not be submitted for this collection of (essentially amateur) work.
We want to see entries that discuss all areas of science, nature, environment, technology, health and medicine, as well as “meta” topics ranging from the Life in Academia, to women/minorities in science, to the intersection between science and policy (and politics) or religion, to skepticism, to history, philosophy and sociology of science, to the analysis of the science publishing world or science communication/journalism, to personal stories by scientists, to patient stories by physicians/nurses (or patients). Check out the 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009 editions to see what kinds of posts made it in the past years.
There is a great diversity of writers in the science blogosphere. Some bloggers consciously target their peers as their main audience. While wonderfully written, such posts tend to have a little bit too much technical jargon (and even formulae) for the lay audience. The target audience of the anthology is lay audience. Actually, the target audience for the book is even more lay than the usual readers of science blogs. These books are supposed to be given as presents to your Mom, or your non-science friends, to show them both that science is cool and that there is great writing on blogs. So, when choosing which posts to enter, look for those that are gripping and exciting and also easy to understand by just about everyone.
Again, here is the Submission form so you can get started. The badges/buttons that make it easy to submit will be available soon (check this blog in a few days). The year’s editor will also be announced on this blog soon. You can also join our Facebook fan page here.
Under the fold are entries so far (I tweeted the link yesterday, so the cat is out of the bag) and, as always, I will keep reposting the growing list regularly throughout the year so you can keep checking here to see what’s already been submitted (no need to submit duplicates – we just delete those extras – once is sufficient):

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