Category Archives: Medicine

Guest Blog on Scientific American – Bacteria, the anti-cancer soldier

James Byrne of the Disease of the Week! blog (also on Twitter) is the latest guest blogger on the Scientific American Guest Blog. Check out his post – Bacteria, the anti-cancer soldier.

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Superbug in the Triangle!

Well, hopefully not the real MRSA in your home! But the book Superbug will be introduced to the audiences around here. Author Maryn McKenna (Twitter) will be in the Triangle this week.

First, on Wednesday October 6th at 7:30 pm, Maryn will be reading at my most favourite bookstore in the world – Quail Ridge Books in Raleigh. I’ll be there.

Then, next day, on Thursday October 7th at 7:00 pm, she will be going over to Durham to read/sign at The Regulator Bookshop. I may try to come to that again.

Join us if you are in town for one or the other or both events!

Wellness and Writing Connections Conference

Wellness and Writing Connections Conference:

The annual Wellness and Writing Connections Conference will be held October 22-23, 2010 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center in Atlanta, GA.

This two-day conference brings together a number of powerhouse leaders in the field of writing for health and healing. Breakout sessions include writing and healing in wartime, writing and compassion fatigue, and writing in integrative medicine, in addition to topics in journaling, memoir, psychological journaling, student writings, and more.

Now, more than ever, creative expression, writing, and the arts are being used in medical settings to process experiences of illness and trauma. Research led by Dr. James Pennebaker has shown that the use of writing has physiological benefits to health and can aid in healing from both physical and emotional trauma.

The Friday evening keynote address will feature Roy Fox, Professor of English Education and Director of the Missouri Writing Project at the University of Missouri. The keynote address on Saturday evening will feature Brenda Stockdale, Director of Mind-Body Medicine for the Radiology Clinics of Georgia. Additional speakers include Lucille Allegretti-Freeman, Tim Blue, Susan Borkin, Angela and Dennis Buttiner, Claudia-Hill Duffee, Carolyn Graham, Claudia Hough, Elaine Handley, Leatha Kendrick, Laura Miller, Diana Rash, Jean Rowe, and Barbara Stahura.

To find out more information and to register, contact Director John Evans at info@wellnessandwritingconenctions.com or visit http://www.wellnessandwritingconnections.com and the Facebook page.

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Grand Rounds Vol. 6 No. 49 – a conference in a tropical island resort

The summer is almost over, but we can try to remain in the summery mood just a little bit longer. Perhaps we can go to a medical conference held at a luscious tropical island resort, listen to presentations, chat in the hallways, and then have great fun at the bar in the evenings. And call it Grand Rounds. No coats and ties allowed – this meeting is supposed to be fun!

Day 1 – Morning session: Biomedical Science

Let’s start with controversy! Laika’s MedLibLog digs into the XMRV controversy with another comprehensive treatment prompted by the newest paper in the field – Does the NHI/FDA Paper Confirm XMRV in CFS? Well, Ditch the MR and Scratch the X… and… you’ve got MLV. And Abbie at ERV covers the same paper without mincing her words – ouch! – in XMRV and chronic fatigue syndrome: Scientific Blue Balls.

Diane Meier at The John A. Hartford Foundation blog wrote a review and summary of a blockbuster study on palliative care and quality (and length!) of life: Palliative Care: We Still Have a Lot to Learn.

Day 1 – afternoon session: The Brain and The Mind

SharpBrains contributors have two entries this week. The first one is by Jo Ellen Roseman and Mary Koppel at AAAS: The Brain in Science Education: What Should Everyone Learn? The second one is Why working memory matters in the knowledge age: study by Dr. Tracy Alloway.

How to Cope with Pain reviews exciting, new, non-invasive and non-medication treatments for pain, in Brain Re-training To Decrease Pain.

Will Meek, PhD is working through human psychology, one post at a time. The latest installment is Romantic vs Committed Love.

Dinah at Shrink Rap, differentiating normal moods from those associated with mental illness: Emotion versus Mental Illness.

Day 1 – hallway conversations: Practice, Patients, Nursing and Cases

Katrina Racial Violence is a poignant recollection of treating a Katrina survivor, who had been threatened with violence, by Toni Brayer, MD at EverythingHealth.

‘Nancy Nurse, RN, MD’ on the Muse, RN is a post motivated by the phrase “If she’s so smart, why isn’t she a doctor?”. Its a little dicey…but Nurses need some dice every once in a while.

Medical Resident, from A Medical Resident’s Journey responds to a recent blog post in the New York Times by Pauline Chen on medical errors: On Medical Mistakes…. And another post on the same topic, at Supporting Safer HealthcareI Care For You; I Am Your Doctor – focuses on the fact that, unfortunately, communication can break down at this most crucial time.

Physician Quality Report Cards, Part II on Kent Bottles Private Views is a post about a physician’s resistance to administrative review and patient feedback. Doctor report cards, NFL football, teachers, controversy, and nasty comments. What more could you want in a blog post?

Fizzy, last week’s host of Grand Rounds over on Mothers in Medicine, starts with a cartoon and writes about looking too young to be a doctor: Get confident, stupid!

Waterworks at Other things amanzi is a great story by Bongi about a joke he played on a not-so-hard-working urologist.

From Kimberly Manning, FACP at ACP Hospitalist, Life at Grady: Black and white, a story about a patient questioning his doctor’s race.

When do medical students start learning to practice medicine defensively? It didn’t take long for this one to encounter the opening lesson: Defensive Medicine 101… it starts now, at The Notwithstanding Blog.

And a little comparative medicine from Dog Zombie: Comparative medicine: what is a wallaby?

Greg Friese at Everyday EMS Tips: Paramedic that Knows Everything Declines Additional Learning

Day 2 – morning session: Medicine and Technology

Livetweeting surgery is becoming all the rage these days. Ramona of Suture for a Living writes about the latest case: Double Hand Transplant on Twitter.

Physicians are a group that greatly adopted the use of smartphones in theor work. Ryan DuBosar at ACP Internist comments in QD: News Every Day–What smartphone are you using?

In Doctors Not Using Email Like It’s 2010 It’s 2010, Elaine Schattner, MD at Medical Lessons considers physicians’ selective use of email, a no-longer-new technology that might, if embraced, facilitate communication between doctors and patients.

Michelle R. Wood of Occam Practice Management looks at some Famous Last Words in regard to technology, and how those words turned out…including the worries about the “paperless” Health Information Technology.

Day 2 – afternoon session: History of Medicine

Delia O’Hara at Birth Story introduces us to a historical figure of Alexis Carrel, who pioneered vascular surgery and transplant surgery.

At From the Hands of Quacks, Jaipreet Virdi gives us a glimpse of quirky medicine from the past, in How to Avoid Deafness and for those who want to know more, there is a Reading List.

Day 2 – hallway conversations: Healthcare policy

Louise at Colorado Health Insurance Insider discusses Amendment 63 On The Ballot In Colorado which will determine who can purchase health insurance.

Day 2 – evening at the bar: The Fun Stuff

The Happy Hospitalist tried something new – to draw a cartoon: Parkinson’s Cruise Cartoon (The Happy Hospitalist Original)

The Poetry Contest at The Examining Room of Dr.Charles ends tonight. Many great health/medical poems were submitted and some of them were posted there. Here is Thirteen Ways of Seeing, a poem (in 13 parts) by Aidel Moodnick.

And with this, the tropical island resort conference ends. Have a great trip home! We’ll see you all again next week at the Grand Rounds hosted by Musings of a Dinosaur.

Call for submissions for Grand Rounds, medical blog carnival

The next edition (Vol. 6 No. 49) of Grand Rounds, the medical blog carnival, will be hosted by me, right here at A Blog Around the Clock. I have hosted it a couple of times early on, but have not done so in a few years. Time to get back to it!

So send me all your posts that have something to do with medicine: fun and quirky stuff, personal stuff, biomedical science, healthcare policy, nursing, patients and cases and medical practice and Medicine2.0 and everything you can think of that is related to medicine and health.

The deadline for submission is August 30th by midnight Eastern time. The carnival will be posted some time in the morning of August 31st.

Send you entries to: nick AT blogborygmi DOT com (though it would be nice if you could also CC it to me at Coturnix AT gmail DOT com if you can remember).

Health and Medicine Poetry Contest

From Dr.Charles (sorry for copying and pasting the whole thing, but I thought all of the information is necessary):

Announcing the first annual 2010 Charles Prize for Poetry. Bold and pretentious name aside, the award will be given to the writer who submits for consideration the most outstanding poem within the context of health and medicine.

Open to everyone (patients, doctors, nurses, students, etc.). Limit 1 or 2 entries per person.

Poems should be related to experiencing, practicing, or reflecting upon a medical, scientific, or health-related matter.

The winner will be selected by a panel of three judges, including me. These other judges may or may not be Nobel Laureates, you never know, but all appreciate poetry. I may ask for your permission to post a copy of your poem on this blog as we go, with or without attribution as you wish.

Is such an eponymous contest grandiose? Yes. Does the limited poetry I’ve written carry the gravitas needed to make me an authority on the subject? No way.

But should your poem be selected as the winner, you shall receive a plaque, an award of $500, and a tasty cherry tomato from my garden. Seriously. At least one person has written that winning the cherry tomato is more important to her than all the gold in the world. I’m sorry that my budget is not higher, but I thought I could swing $500 without enlisting sponsorship. Who needs an iPhone anyway?

So have fun, find inspiration, and send your entry to:

drcharles.examining *at* gmail.com

Contest closes August 31st.

The Vaccine Song (video)