Berry Go Round #31

Welcome to the September edition of Berry Go Round, the blog carnival of all things botanical!

We’ll start with the The Roaming Naturalist who went out into the desert somewhere out in the Western United States and took pictures of Bitterroot, Desert Beauty.

Ted C. MacRae of Beetles In The Bush took a trip to the Sam Baker State Park and saw a Cleft Phlox, which is found in just a handful of Missouri counties.

Christina Agapakis of Oscillator is fascinated with figs and their symbiosis with pollinating wasps so she wrote not one but two posts about them: Edible Symbiosis and Seedlessness.

Sarcozona of Gravity’s Rainbow saw a wild Impatiens with an unusually looking flower – Orange Jewelweed.

Joan Knapp from Anybody Seen My Focus? took a lot of excellent pictures of the Green Comet Milkweed (Asclepias viridiflora) in Wilkes County, Georgia.

Matt DiLeo is The Scientist Gardener. The Orange Mystery Dust that painted everyone’s shoes orange during a ballgame turned out to be from the lawn rust fungi. Matt tells us what that is all about.

Mr. Strawberry of Strawberry introduces us to a strange-looking but mouth-watering new cultivar – the Pineberry: Pineapple Strawberry.

Dave Ingram of the Dave Ingram’s Natural History Blog explains how identification of native vs. introduced grasses requires some Learning about Ligules.

Emilie Wolf of Purple Carrots & Fairy Smoke tells you more than you ever knew about apples in Don’t You Just Love Apples?

Jessica M. Budke from Moss Plants and More takes a look at the new attempt to classify 350 species of peat moss in A Tale of the Sphagnums that Weren’t.

“Where should breeders look for traits like drought resistance among the landraces and wild relatives of crops?” asked Luigi of the Agricultural Biodiversity Weblog and took a look at a new paper about tomatoes: Getting the most out of wild tomatoes.

The Phytophactor gets help from some strange flowers, like a star flower, to get students excited about Pollination biology in the greenhouse (and then you take a fruit, spice and veggie quiz).

Janet Creamer from the Midwest Native Plants, Gardens, and Wildlife took a series of pictures of a bumblebee, the only pollinator strong enough to force open the always closed flower of the Bottle Gentian.

Greg Laden of Greg Laden’s Blog gave his readers a photo quiz – Name that organism and his readers guessed them all.

Everything you ever wanted to know about Sugar beet biology you can learn from Anastasia Bodnar at Biofortified.

And that’s it for this month. Thank you all for your submissions. Next edition of Berry Go Round will be hosted by Mike Bergin at 10000 birds – make sure you send in your entries in time.