Category Archives: SO’09

ScienceOnline’09 – Saturday 9am

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Like everyone else, I had tough choices to make – which session to go to out of four in each time slot! Of course, I spent a year planning, and talking with moderators/panelists/presenters and building each session over time. Now I wanted to see them all. How could I afford to miss any one of them?!
But choices had to be made, and I knew I could rely on the blogosphere to write about other sessions so I could get the idea of how the other stuff went. The blog/media coverage linkfest is growing fast (perhaps start at the bottom and work your way up, posting comments on the way and saying Hello to your new friends), there are ongoing discussions on FriendFeed and new pictures on Flickr.
Also, if you were there, please fill up this short form to give us feedback, so we can make next year’s meeting even better.
So, first thing in the morning, I went to You are a science blogger but you want to publish a pop-sci book? , moderated by Tom Levenson and Dave Munger. Am I thinking about writing a book? No, and this session re-affirmed that decision. I can edit books. I can throw blooks up on Lulu.com. I may even get a collection of essays put together one day. But book-length exposition is not my forte – I do not have the patience and discipline for it. Blogs are just a perfect medium for me – jumping in when the inspiration hits and not worrying when it doesn’t. But for those who are interested in writing a book, this session was chockful of good information, from how to pitch a proposal, to how to make yourself disciplined, to how to actually organize your thoughts for such an endeavor.
Others who blogged about this session:
Pondering Pikaia: ScienceOnline09 Conference Update
Highly Allochthonous: ScienceOnline Day 1: generalised ramblings
Laelaps: SciOnline’09 and the future of Laelaps
Sessions I missed in this time-slot, but others have covered:
Open Access publishing: present and future:
Sciencewomen: Open Access publishing at ScienceOnline 2009
Knowledge Sharing: ScienceOnline’09: Open Access Publishing
bjoern.brembs.net: ScienceOnline09: Midway in the first day
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Semi-live Blogging Scienceonline09: Day 1
McBlawg: Science Online ’09 – How was it…. via the internet?
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Reflections on ScienceOnline09
Deep Sea News: LiveBlogging Science Online ’09: Open Access
Michael Nielsen: The role of open licensing in open science
Christina’s LIS Rant: Science Online ’09: Saturday AM
Science Fiction on Science Blogs?:
The Logical Operator: Science Fiction on Science Blogs – Science Online ’09, Day 1
Ideonexus: ScienceOnline09: Science Fiction in Science Blogs
Confessions of a Science Librarian: ScienceOnline ’09: Saturday summary
Expression Patterns: ScienceOnline09 – Day 2
Science blogging without the blog? (interesting – many people in the private feedback forms indicated they liked this session a lot, but very few blogged about it):
Nobel Intent: ScienceOnline 09: Nobel Intent gives back

ScienceOnline’09 – WiSE Lacks Shanties

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After the Museum tour and dropping by Radisson briefly to see who else has arrived in the meantime, I went home to see the family and walk the reconvalesecent dog for a few minutes (thus choosing to miss Friday Fermentable except for the last few minutes), then back to Sigma Xi for the WiSE networking event.
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The place was packed (my estimate – 300 people) with women in science and engineering from local universities (Duke, NCSU, UNC, NCCU and others) as well as many participants of ScienceOnline09. This was an opportunity for local women in science not just to meet and network with each other (they can do that often as they are all local), but also to meet some of their superstar heroes they know only from the online world and who, just so happens, were in town that night. And in some cases, it was in reverse – guests from far away getting to meet their Triangle heroes, for instance when Erik, one of Miss Baker’s students sought out and found his hero – Meredith Barrett (picture by Miss Baker) – hard to tell which one of them was more excited about the meeting!
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The high point of the evening was the talk by Rebecca Skloot about the origin of HeLa cells, ubiqutous tools in cell biology and cancer research, and the difficult process of writing a book about this. The talk was edge-of-the-seat gripping and quite thought-provoking with several layers of ethical issues involved: the ethics of the doctors who took the cells from Henrietta Lacks, the ethics of scientists who started using the cells, the ethics of business that produce and sell the HeLa cells, the ethics of interviewing the family and writing her book, and the ethical question of what to do with the proceeds and whatever moral obligation the scientific community may have towards the descendants of Henrietta Lacks. It is a mind-boggling case for legal scholars and ethicists to ponder, and quite an eye-opener for the biomedical research community.
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After the talk, and schmoozing over delicious chocolate cake a little more, we went over to the hotel, where Ocean Bloggers, with funny hats, were singing shanties….
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While the Nature Network bloggers meetup, with guests, was at the next table – it just looks serene because of the contrast with the marine rambunctiousness next door…
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The blog/media coverage linkfest is growing fast (perhaps start at the bottom and work your way up, posting comments on the way), there are ongoing discussions on FriendFeed and new pictures on Flickr.
Also, if you were there, please fill up this short form to give us feedback, so we can make next year’s meeting even better.

ScienceOnline’09 – Friday Lab Tour: the NC Museum of Natural Sciences

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After coffee cupping, still pretty frozen, we went back to Radisson to see who else has arrived for ScienceOnline09 in the meantime. I set up my temporary field Headquarters in the lobby (photo by Lenore):
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After a quick lunch, it was time for Lab Tours (check blog posts and pictures for other people’s experiences). A bunch of us went to the NC Museum of Natural Sciences where Roy Campbell, the Director of Exhibits, gave us a fantastic whirlwind tour through the Museum and the vaults, the secret basement chambers that general public cannot access.
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I’ve been going to the Museum for 17 years now, pretty regularly (I used to volunteer there when it was still in the old building), yet I always notice something new, some new detail or improvement they made since the last time I visited.
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This was a pretty big group – if I remember correctly (and it’s all a blur now), we had Melissa, Paula, Elissa, Robyn, Molly, Kim , Patty, Daniel, Sol, Enrico, Carlos, as well as the entire contingent from Miss Baker’s class – eight students, two parents and Miss Baker herself.
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But there is no group big enough or rowdy enough to get Roy off his game. The Museum is enormous, and I don’t think there is anyone in the world but Roy who is capable of giving a tour of it in just two hours and covering everything and going everywhere and saying so much interesting stuff!
I am sure that the visit to the palaeontology lab (where an amazingly well preserved and complete skeleton of a bipedal crocodile was being cleaned) and the vaults was the greatest hit with the group:
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But for me, the most exciting was a brief look through one of the windows, onto the lot next door, where the bulldozers were hard at work digging a big hole – for the new wing of the Museum, as big as the main building, or so it appearrs. And that new wing – now THAT’S going to be exciting and unique, but you will have to read this blog for some time in the future until you get to hear the entire story once it becomes public….

ScienceOnline’09 – Friday Morning Coffee Cupping

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Friday morning was really, really cold (for North Carolina), so what better way to start off ScienceOnline09 than at Counter Culture Coffee where about 25 or so participants (and several other people – this is an open event) showed up bright and early to learn about the science (and business) of coffee.
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Coffee is one of those things that you just drink, unthinkingly, at the time of the morning when it is hard to think anyway. So this was quite an eye-opener – learning what happens between the moment the coffee plant is planted and the moment when you taste the coffee. And there are many steps in-between, and each step involves hard decisions as to how to do it as everything can affect the taste of coffee in the end: where to plant, how to plant, when and how to harvest, how to process it after harvesting, how to ship and store the beans, how to roast it, how to prepare the coffee. And we saw the process as well as learned about the effects of different geographies and practices on the final experience.
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Our hosts presented us with three different ‘mystery’ coffees. First, we smelled the dry, freshly ground beans. Then we smelled it as soon as the hot water was poured over it. Then we smelled it at the exact moment when we broke the layer of foam that formed on the surface (and that can be a STRONG burst of aroma!). Then we tasted one spoonful of coffee. Then we waited about half-a-minute and evaluated the aftertaste.
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At each of those steps we tried to do what is probably the hardest part of the exercise – translate the olfactory associations into words. Smell, the oldest sense, the only one that does not get pre-processed in the thalamus before getting processed in the cortex, is incredibly difficult to describe with language – it affects our emotions more than our rationality. It is hard to ‘classify’ smells in any meaningful way. So, it is not a surprise that some of the descriptions of coffee aromas spoken in the room on Friday took quite a flight of fancy, e.g., “barbequing in the forest”, “dirty baby diapers” and “deflated inflatable kid’s toys heated by the Sun out in the yard”….
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After the tasting, we were shown the rest of facility, including the stacks of bags of coffee, from all around the world, all of it either certified organic, or uncertified but known to be organic anyway.
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Then, we were shown the process of coffee roasting. You start with a barrel of unroasted coffee:
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Then, after testing a small batch, decide which one of the three different roasting machines to use, at which temperature, etc.:
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What comes out is a barrel of roasted coffee, ready for grinding and turning into delicious liquid:
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Now, I have to admit, I came to this event with a whole set of handicaps. First, I am, unlike some other bloggers, incapable of writing poetry or even creative fiction. Thus, my verbal descriptions of coffee smells were quite technical and prosaic, unlike some I mentioned above.
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Second, where I come from, the only liquid that can be called coffee is Turkish coffee. Espresso is frowned upon as “too quick”, thin and weak. Everything else is derogatorily called “instant coffee”, to be served only in hospitals. I have never heard of a concept of decaf before I came to the USA. So, for me, the American coffee is just a very rarely used caffeine delivery device, when I need a really fast, strong and short-lived boost of the drug and nothing else is available.
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When I want to enjoy the taste coffee, I fix myself a Turkish coffee (OK, French Roast will do in a pinch), or have a coffee cake, or get a Mocca. So, trying to figure out the differences between three types of liquids that I barely ever drink was not easy – I was quite a novice. Not that I could not make distinctions between them, but it just not do for me what it did to regular American coffee drinkers.
And finally, after two hours of talking, thinking, smelling and tasting coffee on a very chilly morning, it would have been nice to actually drink a cup!
People you can see in these pictures are Erin Davis, Paul Jones, Henry Gee, Anton Zuiker, Cameron Neylon, DNLee, Carlos Hotta, Victor Henning, Paula Signorini, Enrico Balli, PalMD, Janet Stemwedel, Erin Johsnon, Arikia Millikan, Bjoern Brembs, Diana Pauly and Bob O’Hara, among others. Several of them have already (live)blogged the Coffee Cupping with much greater expertise than I ever could, so visit their blogs for their takes.
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More pictures can be found on Flickr and more blog/media coverage here.

ScienceOnline09 – Thursday

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I am still trying to recover from the previous week. It was quite busy for me, as you may have guessed. But I can start slowly posting my own hazy recollections and pictures now, I think, starting with the first day, Thursday.
After meeting with Anton at Sigma Xi to unload the swag, I went over to Radisson hotel to see who was already there and found Blake, Pal, Bob, Grrrl and gg in the bar:
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A couple of hours later we got in the car and went to the Early Bird Dinner to Town Hall Grill – another tradition at our conferences (we ate there both in 2007 and 2008 as well). I was very happy to be joined by Mrs.Coturnix and Coturnietta, Pal, Anton, gg, Henry, Danielle, Lenore, Danica, Sol, Kevin, Cameron, Irradiatus, Diana and Bjoern (did I forget anyone?).
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The food, as always there, was fantastic. After a rich mozzarela/mesclun/tomato salad (and I got to eat half of my daughter’s salad as well), I had snapper and mussels (with no marine conservation bloggers in attendance, we felt more free to order seafood….), followed by an immense chocolate cake. I hope that others, once they get home and process everything they experienced last week, will remember to blog about the dinner as well. If you do, it’s likely the restaurant page will link to your review as well.
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ScienceOnline’09 – Monday blogging and beyond…

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Today, most of the ScienceOnline09 participants are either traveling home or trying to recover. While many managed to blog or liveblog during the conference, as well as discuss the conference on FriendFeed or Twitter and post pictures on Flickr, others have a different mode: taking some time to digest and then write thoughtful summaries later, once they are rested. First of those summaries are starting to show up online and I will keep updating you as others come in:
Highly Allochthonous: ScienceOnline Day 2: generalised ramblings
The Intersection: Echinoderms Emerge Victorious!
White Coat Underground: I believe!
Lecture Notes: Gender in Science Section
Lecture Notes: Gender in Science Section Part 2: personal perspective
Lecturer Notes: Science Online 09
The OpenHelix Blog: …And Boy is My Brain Tired…
The End Of The Pier Show: Come Out From Under There: We Won’t Bite
Space Cadet Girl: For a Good Time, Check out Science Online 09
DrugMonkey: My friends went to sciOnline09 and all I got was…
Adventures in Ethics and Science: ScienceOnline’09: Diversity in science, online and off
10000birds: Stalking the Red-cockaded Woodpecker
The Scientist NewsBlog: New Impact Metric
Digital Serendipities: Reflections on ScienceOnline09
Laelaps: SciOnline’09 and the future of Laelaps
The Olive Tree: Return from SciOnline’09
Scientific American: The Semantic Web in Action
The Olive Tree: Zoo Review: The North Carolina Zoo
McBlawg: Science Online ’09 – How was it…. via the internet?
The Island of Doubt: Blogging, slogging and flogging
Nobel Intent: ScienceOnline 09: Nobel Intent gives back
Greg Laden: Where’s Greg?
Physics for girls?: Back home from ScienceOnline 09
White Coat Underground: Science Communication 2.0
Counter Minds: ScienceOnline09′ Extravaganza
The Intersection: How Many SciBlings Do You Recognize?
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Reflections on ScienceOnline09
Extreme Biology: Thank You Miss Baker for Science Online ’09
Greg Laden: Science Online 09 Sbling Group Photo
Flying Trilobite: Art Monday: airport sketches
The Other 95%: Missed Conference
Urban Science Adventures!: Book Review – Blog Carnival is up
Skulls in the Stars: Back from ScienceOnline ’09!
The Oyster’s Garter: NOM NOM NOM: Digesting Science Online
Brontossauros em meu jardim: Por uma blogosfera mais madura
Expression Patterns: Evidence
Ideonexus: Science Online 2009
business|bytes|genes|molecules: download, mirror, fork
Greg Laden: Science Online 09
Blogfish: Science Online 09 and the ocean of the unknown
Thesis – with Children: ScienceOnline’09 – The Roundup
Sciencewomen: Snapshots of ScienceOnline09
NICHOLAS INSIDER: from the trenches: Communicating science one key at a time
The Drinking Bird: One closer to 10,000
Ideonexus: ScienceOnline09: Science Fiction in Science Blogs
Bioephemera: Art vs. Science, Part One: Semiconductor
Science in the open: A specialist OpenID service to provide unique researcher IDs?
Open Access News: PLoS ONE will offer more impact-related data on articles
Almost Diamonds: Whither Allies
Terra Sigillata: ScienceOnline’09: megaprops to Sigma Xi and all who contributed
Ideonexus: ScienceOnline09: Science Online – middle/high school perspective
Knowledge Sharing: ScienceOnline’09: Open Access Publishing
The End Of The Pier Show: Impact Fauna
Ars Technica: Science Online 09: moving beyond text
Deep Sea News: LiveBlogging Science Online ’09: Open Access
Eclectic Glob of Tangential Verbosity: Science Online 09
Southern Fried Science: Getting a sense of porpoise
Genomeweb blog: At Least We Know Open Access Was a Hit
TalkingScience: For A Good Time, Check out Bloggers from Science Online 09
AlexLey.com: SO’09: Thank you, please come again
AlexLey.com: SO’09: The structure of a Saturday
AlexLey.com: World Air Traffic
AlexLey.com: SO’09: Designing Sundays
Lab Life: Everything social
Expression Patterns: ScienceOnline09 – Day 1
TGAW: iNaturalist: East Coast vs. West Coast
Ideonexus: ScienceOnline09: The Semantic Web in Science
CIT Blog: What your future students think
Crowded Head, Cozy Bed: Teaching College Science: Blogs and Beyond
Knowledge Sharing: ScienceOnline’09: Video in Scientific Research
Knowledge Sharing: ScienceOnline’09: Semantic Web
Page 3.14: The Buzz: ScienceOnline’09: A Communication Convention
bjoern.brembs.blog: ScienceOnline09: How to get rid of the impact factor
Also, help me out here. Both Google Blosearch and Technorati are idiosyncratic – some posts show up very quickly, some with a long delay and some never. If I have missed a post of yours, old or new, about ScienceOnline09, please let me know by e-mail or by posting the permalink in the comments here. It also helps if your post contains the word “ScienceOnline’09” in it and/or the link to the wiki homepage.

ScienceOnline’09 – How was it for you?

ScienceOnline09 is over, people are going home, and the online coverage so far appears to be very positive. I hope that conversations started at the conference continue, online and offline.
In the meantime, if you have participated either in RealLife or virtually, and while the memories are still fresh in your mind, please take a minute and fill in the feedback form, to help us make the next year’s conference even better. Thank you!

ScienceOnline’09 – Sunday blogging

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And here is what bloggers wrote so far today:
The Logical Operator: Not-so-live blogging Science Online ’09
The Logical Operator: Science Fiction on Science Blogs – Science Online ’09, Day 1
The End Of The Pier Show: Lines Written At 1.20 am ET Sunday 18 January
The End Of The Pier Show: Prevarication, 7.30 am ET, Sunday 18 January
Highly Allochthonous: ScienceOnline Day 1: generalised ramblings
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Nature Blogging 101
White Coat Underground: Carolina dreamin’
Makroskop, laboratorium przyszłości: Science Online ’09
The Flying Trilobite: ScienceOnline09 – my bouncing brain
The Flying Trilobite: ScienceOnline09 – Art & Science afterword
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Semi-live Blogging Scienceonline09: Day 2
Gobbledygook: ScienceOnline09: Providing public health and medical information to all
business|bytes|genes|molecules: Rethinking Wikipedia
FairerScience Weblog: Gender, Race and Oversized Postcards
Malaria, Bedbugs, Sea Lice, and Sunsets: Science Online 09: In Praise Of Connections
Open Reading Frame: Another wonderful conference
Southern Fried Science: Thoughts on ScienceOnline’09
Rastro de Carbono: Filosofando sobre divulgação e jornalismo científico
Brontossauros em meu jardim: Importante! Boas e más notícias!
Raio-X: Lablogatórios no ScienceOnline’09
The Real Paul Jones: Science Online 09, The Opposite(s) of Property, Steam Power and Carrboro Obama Fest
Expression Patterns: I’m asleep right now
business|bytes|genes|molecules: ScienceOnline’09: The return journey
Biochemicalsoul: ScienceOnline09 – Warm, Fuzzy Feelings
Mistersugar: ScienceOnline’09 is pau hana
Check the pictures on Flickr and live microblogging on Twitter and FriendFeed.

ScienceOnline’09 – Saturday blogging

Too tired (and it’s too late) to write anything myself….but others have done it:
Sciencewomen: Overwhelmed at ScienceOnline 2009
Sciencewomen: Open Access publishing at ScienceOnline 2009
Sciencewomen: Alice’s gender and science session: How can we be allies?
Sciencewomen: ScienceOnline09: The day wends on
Highly Allochthonous: Liveblogging from ScienceOnline…
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): What Happened to Tangled Bank?
Adventures in Ethics and Science: ScienceOnline’09: Managing your online persona through transitions.
Culture Dish: Documents for my ScienceOnline 09 Getting Published Talk
The End Of The Pier Show:
Thoughts from Kansas: Synchronicity
The Intersection: Weekend At ScienceOnline’09
Endless Possibilities v2.0: ScienceOnline’09
Charles Darwin’s blog: A glass of sherry in the direction of those
The End Of The Pier Show: Lines on the First Morning of ScienceOnline09
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Semi-live Blogging Scienceonline09: Day 1
10000birds: Talking Blog Carnivals at ScienceOnline09
bjoern.brembs.net: ScienceOnline09: Open Notebook Science
bjoern.brembs.net: ScienceOnline09: Midway in the first day
bjoern.brembs.net: ScienceOnline09: Social Networks for Scientists
Crowded Head, Cozy Bed: Science Online Notes
Physics for girls?: ScienceOnline ’09
HASTAC blogs: Liveblogging ScienceOnline ’09: Coffee Cupping Event
HASTAC blogs: Liveblogging ScienceOnline ’09: Race in Science Online and Offline
HASTAC blogs: Liveblogging ScienceOnline ’09: Anonymity and Pseudonymity – Building Reputation Online
HASTAC blogs: Liveblogging Science Online ’09: Social networks for scientists
UDreamOfJanie: Lounging About
Pondering Pikaia: ScienceOnline09 Conference Update
Lots more on Twitter and Friendfeed. Continuing tomorrow….

ScienceOnline09 – Thursday and Friday

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ScienceOnline09 is in full swing. I don’t have much time and opportunity to go online, as you may have noticed – so many old friends to hug! Already a full day behind us – a lovely dinner at Town Hall Grill last night, Coffee Cupping this morning, Lab Tours in the afternoon (I went to the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences), then a quick run home to see Mrs.Coturnix and walk the dog, then back to Sigma Xi, the Friday Fermentable, the Women’s Networking Event and the amazing talk by Rebecca Skloot. An hour at the bar listening to ocean-bloggers singing shanties, then, exhausted, time to go back home and see what people have blogged about it all so far. Check it out:
Thursday, January 15th, 2009:
Thoughts from Kansas: Deep ScienceOnline ’09 Thoughts
Laelaps: Almost time for Science Online ’09!
Deep Sea News: Out of the Depths, We are Reborn! (again)
Adventures in Ethics and Science: On my way to ScienceOnline’09
The Beagle Project Blog: ScienceOnline09 on my mind
Biology in Science Fiction: I’m Sorry I’ll Be Missing ScienceOnline09
The Oyster’s Garter: Off to Science Online 2009
Urban Science Adventures!: ScienceOnline09 Conference Begins
Lecturer Notes: SO’09 I’ve Arrived
Greg Laden: Live Blogging the NC ScienceOnline 09 Conference
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: Arrived in NC
Cephalopodcast: The Invertebrate Wars Redux
Malaria, Bedbugs, Sea Lice, and Sunsets: Science Online 09: A Field Guide
Highly Allochthonous: Coming to America
Skulls in the Stars: Off to ScienceOnline ’09!
Friday, January 16th, 2009:
Etherized: ScienceOnline09 Conference in Raleigh, NC
Adventures in Ethics and Science: ScienceOnline’09: Liveblogging Coffee Cupping at Counter Culture Coffee
Gobbledygook: ScienceOnline09: Providing public health and medical information to all
Greg Laden: Live Blogging the NC ScienceOnline 09 Conference
The End Of The Pier Show: Lines Written Over Breakfast, Friday 16 January
Greg Laden: Janie Belle has Entered the Building
Laelaps: Made it!
Expression Patterns: Friday Fermentable Liveblog
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: ScienceOnline09: live-blogging the wine tasting
Bioephemera: ScienceOnline09!
Adventures in Ethics and Science: ScienceOnline’09: Liveblogging Coffee Cupping at Counter Culture Coffee.
Adventures in Ethics and Science: ScienceOnline’09: Liveblogging a Friday Fermentable wine-tasting.
Sciencewomen: Friday Night at ScienceOnline
Pharyngula: Heat wave!
Science After Sunclipse: ScienceOnline’09: The Conference That Rhymes
Thesis – with Children: ScienceOnline’09
Urban Science Adventures!: ScienceOnline09 Conference Begins
Thesis – with Children: Liveblogging – with Wine
Malaria, Bedbugs, Sea Lice, and Sunsets: Science Online 09: The Limitations Of Iconography
bjoern.brembs.blog: ScienceOnline09: FridayFermentable liveblogging wine tasting
The Flying Trilobite: Arrival at ScienceOnline ’09
FairerScience Weblog: Waiting for the wine tasting
Mistersugar: ScienceOnline’09 is on
Pondering Pikaia: In Which I Venture North for Blog Fun
Endless Forms: In Which I Venture North for Blog Fun
Check the rest here.
Follow the conversations also on FriendFeed, Facebook and Twitter and check out the pictures on Flickr.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 10

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The interest in the conference was overwhelming this year. When we opened the registration back in September we did not expect that we would have to close it in less than three weeks, already over our maximal number of 200. As a result, our waitlist got bigger and bigger and, occasionally, as someone would cancel, we could invite someone from the waitlist to register.
About a dozen people held off until the end, hoping they would still be able to make it, but had to cancel over the last week or two. In their place, we invited several people from the waitlist (and yes, we are still over capacity, and hope everyone will take the crowding with good humor). Let me introduce them today:
Arikia Millikan is everybody’s favourite intern here at scienceblogs.com and she blogs on Page 3.14. She will join Erin Johnson in presenting Scienceblogs.com at the conference.
Clark Boyd is the Technology Correspondent for PRI’s The World.
Joshua Rosenau is my SciBling, over at Thoughts from Kansas, as well as the Public Information Project Director at NCSE.
Christopher Conklin works for Blogads, the Chapel Hill based pioneering online advertising company.
Jason Smith is the Associate Editor and webmaster at UNC’s Endeavors magazine.
Nathan Swick blogs on The Drinking Bird and is a Scholarship Coordinator at the UNC-Morehead Planetarium & Science Center.
Benjamin Schell, Christopher Perrien and Tessa Perrien write for Science in the Triangle, an evolving experiment in community science journalism and scientific-community organizing.
Catherine Clabby is an Associate Editor and Katie Lord is the Associate Publisher at American Scientist magazine.
Karen Ventii is a science writer and a (former, but nobody is really “former”) SciBling (at Science To Life).
acmegirl is a blogger on Thesis – with Children.
KT Vaughan is the Pharmacy Librarian, a blogger on Pharmacy Librarian and Clinical Assistant Professor in the School of Pharmacy at UNC.
Harvey Krasny is the Founder of CaroTech, LLC.
Caroline McMillan is a journalism student at UNC, the Co-Editor-in-Chief of Carrboro Commons and Editor-in-Chief of ‘Rivals’ magazine (yes, UNC and Duke students can work together!).
Leah Gordon is the Knowledge Management Specialist at MEASURE Evaluation Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Allison Gruber is a science writing student at Duke University.
Angela Czahor is a science writing student at Duke University.
Alexandra Levitt is a science writing student at Duke University.
Grace Baranowski is a science writing student at Duke University.
Diane Bosnjak is an AIBS/COPUS organizer of Year of Science 2008.
Nancy Shepherd, MBA PhD is the President and CEO at Shepherd Research, LLC
Soumya Vemuganti is a graduate student at UNC in the Departnent of Cell and Developmental Biology, she is starting to write for an online health website and interested in pursuing a career in medical/science writing.
Elie Dolgin is associate editor at The Scientist
Chris Nicolini is the Web Producer and Editor for the American Institute of Physics
Pamela Reynolds is a Graduate Student in the Biology Department at UNC.

ScienceOnline09 – virtual participation

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It’s here. The first traveling participants are arriving tomorrow! Anywhere between 200 and 240 people are expected at any given time during the three days of the conference, with another 60+ people, regrettably, remaining on the waitlist even after some last-minute cancellations allowed us to invite a couple of dozen waitlisted folks. The waitlisted locals are welcome to add their names to extra events, e.g., meals or lab tours if there are empty slots remaining, just to meet the participants face-to-face if they want to.
Those who will be here in person will get to meet each other in Real Life. But others can also participate and follow from the distance in various ways. The Demos will be screencast and most of the sessions will be either live-streamed or recorded and all the videos will be deposited or linked to somewhere on the wiki. More details about this later.
Throughout the conference, your best starting point will be the Live Coverage page which will be enriched over the next day or two to provide more content.
There will be ongoing discussions on Facebook, on FriendFeed and Twitter (use the scio09 hashtag).
Tag your Flickr images with scio09 as well.
If you blog about it, made sure that there is a term or link to scienceonline09.com somewhere in your post, so I can find it and, whenever I can, add it to the Blog and Media Coverage page.
And finally, don’t forget that each session has its own wiki page where discussion is supposed to take place.

Science 2.0 article quotes four ScienceOnline’09 participants

Science 2.0: New online tools may revolutionize research quotes Michael Nielsen, Eva Amsen, Corie Lok and Jean-Claude Bradley. Article is good but short. If you come to ScienceOnline’09 or participate virtually, you can get the longer story straight from them.

ScienceOnline’09 – the Weather

The weather prediction for this week is cold and clear to partly cloudy. If you are coming from Canada, you’ll probably think that’s warm, but for us here, this is very cold. At least, it appears at the moment, we will avoid snow unlike last year:
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ScienceOnline09 – Meals

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The Conference is pretty long this year, yet people need to eat!
There will be free food and coffee at Sigma Xi on Saturday and Sunday for breakfast and lunch, as well as a wine-tasting and a cocktail party at the Friday Wise event (though, it is not a full meal – “The networking reception will consist primarily of desserts, wine, coffee, and some non-alcoholic beverages. So unless you want to have dessert for dinner, please make plans accordingly.”).
But, it is a free conference with limited funds, so for other meals you need to pay for yourself. That does not mean you are on your own, wondering around the Traingle trying to find a restaurant. We have organized this for you:
On Thursday afternoon at 6pm, there will be an Early Bird Dinner for which we have a few open slots, so sign up if you can make it. If you are local, offer to give rides to and from Radisson. If you are arriving too late for this, look out for other conference participants at the Radisson bar.
We will all gather for dinner on Saturday night at Radisson. But, we need to know ASAP if you will be joining us (heck, even if you are not registered for the conference and are just a groupie or a fan, you can sign up for this) so we can give the estimated number to the hotel tomorrow. So, please sing up here now!
And feel free to organize smaller group meals or meetups on your own, on the Friday or the Travel and Lodging pages.
The conference is in a few days. You can check the weather here, familiarize yourself with the Program (and add questions and comments to the individual session pages) and with other participants so you can make the best use of your time.

ScienceOnline’09 – Transportation!

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Well, ScienceOnline’09 is next week!!!
Most of the stuff on the organizational side is now set and we only have a few last-minute things to take care of. But this is a free, community conference – try to get in touch with each other and organize additional meetups, or to help each other in various ways as much as you can.
The most important thing for the guests out of town is to have reliable transportation. Sigma Xi and Radisson are in the middle of the Triangle and public transportation is, well, not so great. So we would like the locals to offer to give rides as much as possible.
First – Radisson provides free shuttle between the hotel and the airport and between the hotel and Sigma Xi. Whe you land at RDU, give the hotel a call and the van will be there in 5 minutes. If you can co-ordinate this with others arriving at the same time, this will make the whole thing more efficient. Then reserve the shuttle back to the airport at the reception desk.
Try to organize large-ish groups to use the shuttle to go to Sigma Xi (and back) so they don’t drive people around one at a time.
I want to ask the motorized locals to visit various pages on the wiki to see who is asking for rides where and when and to offer to give rides.
Rides are especially needed for the Thursday night Early Bird dinner, the Friday morning Science Of Coffee event and for Friday afternoon Lab Tours. All of those events are pretty far away from the hotel and Sigma Xi so I hope the locals offer to help.

ScienceOnline’09 – Nature blogging

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Continuing with highlighting sessions at the conference – take a look at this one: Nature blogging
This session is moderated by Grrrlscientist and Kevin Zelnio:

Take your camera outdoors and bring your local natural beauty and wildlife to the homes of your readers. Add information about it. Join the nature blogging community and participate in community activities no matter where on the planet you are.

Go to the wiki page and add your own questions and comments.
Check out other sessions I covered previously:
ScienceOnline’09 – Education sessions
ScienceOnline’09 – individual session pages
ScienceOnline’09 – some more individual session pages
ScienceOnline09 – more individual session pages
ScienceOnline09 – even more individual session pages
ScienceOnline09 – blogging from strange, crazy places!
ScienceOnline09 – Hey, You Can’t Say That!
ScienceOnline09 – Alternative Careers
ScienceOnline09 – On Reputation
ScienceOnline09 – show-and-tell
ScienceOnline09 – workshops
ScienceOnline09 – arts and humanities
ScienceOnline09 – tapping into the hive-mind
ScienceOnline09 – Rhetoric of science
ScienceOnline09 – Open Access
Science and Fiction: What Do You Think?
ScienceOnline’09 – the Women’s Networking Event
ScienceOnline’09 – Friday Lab Tours

ScienceOnline’09 – Friday Lab Tours

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There are still some free spots, if you are coming to the Conference on Friday, for some of the Lab Tours (all at 3-4pm):
You can visit the Duke University Smart Home:

Check out the $2 million Smart Home, a living lab and dormitory for ten Duke students to live relatively sustainable and super high tech lifestyles, flushing toilets with rainwater and wearing RFID tags so each room knows who they are and what they’d like to listen to. (PS – the house has 4 Gig fiber optic cable in every room, making it the fastest dorm on the planet!)

Or you can see the primates at the Duke Lemur Center and meet your prosimian relatives.
The tours to Biomanufacturing Research Institute and Technology Enterprise (BRITE) and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences are already full. We may add another one soon, so check the wiki later.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 9

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Let’s highlight the rest of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Theresa Van Acker is a science teacher at the Morehead Montessori Elementary School in Durham.
Dani Vasco is a student at the Riverside High School and was a part of Duke’s Summer research program which includes obligatory student blogging – Dani’s blog is here.
Robyn Walker is the Communications Assistant at the Duke University Nicholas School of the Environment.
Robin Walls and Nathan Walls are software developers for McClatchy Interactive.
Adnaan Wasey is the Web Editor for The Takeaway at WNYC Radio and the Web Advisor for the Friendship News Network.
Brian Westwood is a Lab Technician at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and blogs on Janus guards the fence /|\ so, what are you doing?
Zakiya Whatley is a student in the Program in Genetics and Genomics at Duke.
Christina Whittle is a graduate student in the Department of Biology at UNC.
John Wilbanks is the Vice President of Science Commons and my Scibling on Common Knowledge. He will lead the session Semantic web in science: how to build it, how to use it.
Antony Williams is the Director of Chemzoo Inc, which runs Chemspider and the Chemspider blog. He will demonstrate Chemspider at the conference.
Jennifer Williams writes for The OpenHelix Blog.
Carol Winkelman is a freelance grant coach for NIH and NCI.
Kristen Wolfe is the Science Education Resource Center Assistant at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham and a blogger for the Museum’s Science Education blog.
Vanessa Woods is a bonobo researcher and a writer and she blogs on Bonobo Handshake. She will be on the panel Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Mark Yan is a scientist and educator in Raleigh.
Jeff Yeo is a graduate student in the Medical & Science Journalism Program at UNC.
Carmen Yeung is a student at the Duke Marine Laboratory and she blogs on Real Oceans.
Elsa Youngsteadt is an entomologist and a science writer. She just started her new job as a Programs Manager at Sigma Xi, where the conference is hosted.
Kevin Zelnio is at the Marine Conservation Molecular Facility at Duke Marine Lab and a blogger on Deep Sea News and The Other 95%. He will co-moderate the session on Nature blogging and will be on the panel on Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Tracy Zimmerman is the Public Relations Director at the FPG Child Development Institute at UNC.
Stephanie Zvan is a Science Fiction writer and a blogger on Almost Diamonds. She will co-lead the session on Science Fiction on Science Blogs?
Oh, and while we are in the Z’s….both Anton Zuiker and myself belong here, at the end of the list. We are the guys who organized all this…. Anton is a long-time blogger, the founder of BlogTogether.org, and manager of Internal Communications at Duke Medicine, which involved designing and running the Web-based Inside Duke Medicine as well as re-designing their print newsletter.
If, during these last few days, we manage to squeeze in a few people from the waitlist (which now has more than 60 names on it!) I will let you all know with another post like this, listing them all.

The Open Laboratory 2008 – and the Winners are…..

I know many of you are trembling in anticipation: “Did I make it this year?”. Well, it’s like the Oscars – the Academy Awards are kept tightly under wraps until the moment the envelope is opened.
The list of entries was long, and full of excellent posts – this was hard to judge!
And, Jennifer Rohn, this year’s Editor, just handed me the envelope. Trust me – I have not seen the list of winners myself until now.
And, the winners are…..
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Research with vulnerable populations: considering the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (part 1).
All My Faults are Stress-Related: Data, Interpretations and Field Work
Bad Astronomy: WR 104: A nearby gamma-ray burst?
Bayblab: A History of Beardism and the Science that Backs It
Cabinet of Wonders: A Rule of Thumb
Catalogue of Organisms: Are You Sucking on a Lemon or a Lime?
Charles Darwin’s Blog: Someone should invent a device to look at the micro world
Cognitive Daily: How to make your eye feel like it’s closed, when it’s actually open
Cosmic Variance: The First Quantum Cosmologist
Dear Blue Lobster: Bloop: A Crustacean Phenomenon?
Denialism blog: Fountain pens
Dr. Jekyll & Mrs. Hyde: Why I blog….
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part I
Green Gabbro: The Igneous Petrology of Ice Cream
Hope for Pandora: Dear Reviewer
The Beagle Project Blog: Detecting natural selection: a pika’s tale
Laelaps: Who scribbled all over Darwin’s work?
Life, Birds, and Everything: Do we see what bees see?
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Audubon’s Aviary: Portraits of Endangered Species
Mad Scientist, Jr.: Brain Extractions
Marmorkrebs: How Marmorkrebs can make the world a better place
Mind the Gap: In which science becomes a sport – hypothetically speaking
Minor Revisions: To Whom it May Concern
Nano2Hybrids: What IS a carbon nanotube?
Neurotic Physiology: Uber Coca, by Sigmund Freud, (reposted on Neurotopia 2.0: Uber Coca, by Sigmund Freud)
Not Exactly Rocket Science: Space Invader DNA jumped across mammalian genomes
Nothing’s Shocking: Poster session paparazzi
Observations of a Nerd: Having Some Fun With Evolution
Plus magazine – news from the world of maths: United Kingdom – Nil Points
Podblack Blog: Smart Bitches, Not Meerly Sex
Pondering Pikaia: Social Clocks: How do cave bats know when it is dark outside?
Providentia: Dr. Fliess’ Patient
Quintessence of Dust: Finches, bah! What about Darwin’s tomatoes?
Reciprocal Space: I get my kicks from thermodynamicks!
Rubor Dolor Calor Tumor: Calor?
Science After Sunclipse: Physics Makes a Toy of the Brain
Sciencewomen: A reckless proposal, or ‘Scientists are people too, and it’s time we started treating them that way.’
Terra Sigilatta: Liveblogging the Vasectomy Chronicles
The End Of The Pier Show: On The Hardness of Biology
The Loom: Even Blood Flukes Get Divorced
The OpenHelix Blog: The Beginnings of Immunofluorescence
The Oyster’s Garter: How a coccolithophore without its plates is like a grin without a cat
The Scientist: On the Nature of Networking
The Tree of Life: What is so bad about brain doping? Apparently, NIH thinks something is.
Tom Paine’s Ghost: Biochemistry of Halloween: Installment 1
Tomorrow’s Table: 10 Things about GE crops to Scratch From Your Worry List
Uncertain Principles: We Are Science
Wired Science Blog: Correlations: The Third Branch of Science?
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Expect The Unexpected
The winners in the poetry and cartoon categories will be announced tomorrow, right here, same place, same time.
Update: the winners in the cartoon and poetry categories are:
xkcd: Purity
Digital Cuttlefish: The Evolutionary Biology Valentine’s Day Poem

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 8

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Dixie-Ann Sawin is a Research Fellow in the Neurotoxicology Group at NIEHS.
Amy Sayle is the Educator in the Adult Programs at the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center in Chapel Hill, NC.
Scicurious is a graduate student in Physiology and Pharmacology and my SciBling, on Neurotopia (v.2.0). She will co-moderate the session on the Web and the History of Science.
Sciencewoman is, well, my SciBling and a Sciencewoman.
Allison Scripa is a Science Librarian at Virginia Tech.
Megan Scudellari is a freelance science writer.
Louis Shackleton is a Biology Ed student at Coastal Carolina Community College and he blogs on Crowded Head, Cozy Bed and manages what used to be his blogs, but are now overtaken by his family – U Dream Of Janie and Kissing Corporal Kate.
Vagisha Sharma is a Research Scientist in Biochemistry at the University of Washington.
Paula Signorini is a Science Textbook Editor, she teaches at the University of Sao Paolo, Brazil, and blogs on Rastro de Carbono.
Kamana Singh is a Microbiology graduate student at North Carolina State University.
Deepak Singh is the Business Development Manager at Amazon.com Web Services, one of the founders/developers of Bioscreencast and a blogger. He will co-moderate two sessions: Science blogging networks – what works, what does not? and Social networking for scientists.
Rebecca Skloot is a science writer and journalist and the brand new SciBling on Culture Dish. Rebecca will give the Friday Night Keynote Lecture – Women, science, and storytelling: The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks (a.k.a. HeLa), and one woman’s journey from scientist to writer and on Saturday will co-moderate the session on How to become a (paid) science journalist: advice for bloggers.
Anthony So is the Director of The Program on Global Health and Technology Access at the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke.
Ryan Somma is a software developer and an amateur scientist at Port Discover Science Center – he blogs on Ideonexus.
Southern Fried Scientist is a marine biologist with a thing for fungi.
Blake Stacey does math and physics at the New England Complex Systems Institute and is my SciBling, over on Science After Sunclipse.
Janet Stemwedel is a professor of Philosophy at San Jose State University and is also my SciBling on Adventures in Ethics and Science. She will lead the session about Online science for the kids (and parents).
Jeff Stern is the Director of Membership Advancement at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham.
Andrew Su is the Senior Research Investigator in the Computational Biology Group at The Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation and one of the developers of BioGPS. He will co-moderate the session Community intelligence applied to gene annotation.
Brian and Tracey Switek are coming from New Jersey. Brian is a student at Rutgers and my SciBling at Laelaps. He will co-moderate the session on Teaching College Science: Blogs and Beyond and the session on Web and the History of Science.
Jonathan Tarr blogs for HASTAC here at Duke.
Flora Taylor is the Book Review Editor for American Scientist.
Beck Tench is a blogger on Another HCI Blog and The Smartwool Experiment, works at Museum of Life and Science in Durham, where she does interesting things like Useum and is part of the team that is developing Science In The Triangle portal. She will do a show-and-tell session about the Museum of Life and Science online presence and ScienceintheTriangle.org.
Andrew Thaler is a PhD student in the Duke University Marine Lab .
Cheryl Thompson is the Web Manager in the Office of Communications & Public Liaison at the National Institute of Environemental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
Erica Tsai is a graduate student in Biology at Duke, developer of PhyloGeoViz and the organizer of the Friday Women’s Networking Event at the conference.
Eugenia Tsamis is a graduate student in Biochemistry at Duke.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 7

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Talia Page is a future astronaut, senior staff at Talking Science, writer for Space Lifestyle magazine, Chief Editor for the Imagine Science Film Festival, and a blogger on Space Cadet. She will be on the panel Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Neeru Paharia is a doctoral student who is starting to build AcaWiki, a wiki of open-access long abstracts of peer-reviewed research, which she will present as a demo.
David Palange is a student and blogger in the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke.
Diana Pauly is a human immunologist in Berlin, Germany.
Alice Pawley is a professor in the School of Engineering Education at Purdue University and my SciBling, writing on Sciencewomen. She will co-moderate a session on Gender in science — online and offline.
Marsha Penner is a postdoc in the Department of Psychology & Neuroscience at Duke.
Anna Lena Phillips is assistant book review editor for American Scientist and is the poetry editor for the online journal Fringe where she is also one of the bloggers.
Christina Pikas is the librarian at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory and a blogger. She will co-moderate a session on How to search scientific literature.
Mark Powell is the Vice President for Sustainability Partnerships/Fisheries at the Ocean Conservancy. He writes the Blogfish blog and runs the Carnival of the Blue. He’ll be on the panel of the session Hey, You Can’t Say That!
Moshe Pritsker is the CEO of the Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) which he will show-and-tell at the conference. He will also co-moderate the session Not just text – image, sound and video in peer-reviewed literature.
Danica Radovanovic is a graduate student in digital communications studies, columnist for Global Voices Online and blogger on Digital Serendipities. She will co-moderate a session on Open Access in the networked world: experience of developing and transition countries.
Lenore Ramm works in IT at Duke and is a foodblogger at Eclectic Glob of Tangential Verbosity.
John Rees is a Web developer and architect for IBM Global Services and a blogger.
Ren Rongqin is a Signal Transduction researcher at the National Institute of Environemental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
Lucy Ringland is the Technical Editor/Application Analyst at NC Office of State Budget & Management.
Jason Robertshaw works at the Mote Marine Laboratory and runs Cephalopodcast (which also includes the Cephaloblog and Cephalovlog).
Joshua Rosenau is the Public Information Project Director at the National Center for Science Education and my SciBling, blogging on Thoughts from Kansas.
Eric Roston is the author of The Carbon Age and the blogger on Carbon Nation and Harvard’s Now, New, Next.
Chris Rowan is a geologist at University of Johannesburg, South Africa, and my SciBling, writing on Highly Allochthonous.
Aaron Rowe is a blogger on Wired Science.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 6

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
April L. MacKellar is a doctoral student in the Department of Biochemistry at Duke.
Rick MacPherson works for the Coral Reef Alliance and blogs on Malaria, Bedbugs, Sea Lice, and Sunsets. He will be on the panel Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations and will co-moderate the session Hey, You Can’t Say That!
Robin Mackar is the News Director at the National Institute of Environemental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
Kelly Malcom is the Editor for Internal Communications at Duke University Health System and writes for Office of News & Communications at Duke Medicine.
Jan McColm is in the Department of Genetics at UNC and the Managing Editor of Genetics in Medicine.
Jennifer McDaniel is a MSLS student at Catholic University of America (DC), library specialist at GWU and a blogger at Mystery Book.
John McKay is a historian and he blogs on Archy. He will co-moderate a session on Web and the History of Science and will be on the panel on Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Paul Medina is a postdoc in the Brenman lab in the Cell & Developmental Biology Department at UNC medical school.
Glendon Mellow is a freelance artist and he blogs on The Flying Trilobite. He will co-moderate the session Art and science — online and offline and the workshop How to paint your own blog images.
Dennis Meredith, the creator of EurekAlert, is a science writer and science communications consultant, blogging on Research Explainer.
Arikia Millikan is the intern at Seed Scienceblogs.com and blogs on the editors’ blog Page 3.14.
Mollie Minear is a PhD student in the Program in Genetics and Genomics at Duke.
Elisabeth Montegna is a graduate student at University of Chicago and blogs on SECular Thoughts.
Katie Mosher is the Communications Director at North Carolina Sea Grant.
Dave Munger is a writer, a blogger on Cognitive Daily and Word Munger and the founder and manager of Researchblogging.org (which he will demonstrate at the conference). He will co-moderate a session You are a science blogger but you want to publish a pop-sci book?
Greta Munger is a professor of psychology at Davidson College and the co-blogger on Cognitive Daily.
PZ Myers is a biology professor at UM-Morris, columnist for Seed Magazine, and runs the popular blog Pharyngula. He will co-moderate the session Hey, You Can’t Say That!
Cameron Neylon blogs on Science in the open and will co-moderate two sessions: Science blogging networks – what works, what does not? and Open Notebook Science – how to do it right (if you should do it at all).
Michael Nielsen is one of the pioneers of quantum computation and a blogger. He is currently writing a book on Future Of Science.
Andrea Novicki is the Academic Technology Consultant at the Center for Instructional Technology, Duke University Libraries. She will co-moderate the session on Teaching College Science: Blogs and Beyond.
Bob O’Hara is the Acedemy Fellow in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Helsinki, and he blogs on Deep Thoughts and Silliness.
Shelly Olsan is the Communications Manager at the Krell Institute.
Ivan Oransky is the managing editor at Scientific American. He also holds an appointment at NYU Medical School as Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, and teaches at the City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 5

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Greg Laden is an anthropologist, a part time independent scholar and part time associate adviser with the Program for Individualized Learning at the the University of Minnesota and a prolific SciBling blogger. He will be on the panel
Hey, You Can’t Say That!
Benjamin Landis is a student in the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke.
Patric Lane is the Health and Science Editor at UNC-Chapel Hill News Services.
Les Lang is the Director of Research Communications and Assistant Director of Public Affairs and Marketing in the Medical Center News Office at UNC.
Erica Lannan is a Signal Transduction researcher at the National Institute of Environemental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
Sol Lederman is the Consultant for US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information in Santa Fe (which he will show-and-tell) and a blogger.
Alex Lee is a production artist at a marketing company and blogs at Blinding Flash of the Obvious.
Danielle Lee is an animal behavior researcher at the University of Missouri – St. Louis and blogs on Urban Science Adventures. She will co-moderate the session on Race in science – online and offline.
Tom Levenson is a professor of science writing and head of the graduate science writing program at MIT and he blogs on The Inverse Square Blog. He will co-moderate two sessions: one on How to become a (paid) science journalist: advice for bloggers and the other one: You are a science blogger but you want to publish a pop-sci book?.
Thomas Linden is the Anchor of Journal Watch Audio, the Director of the UNC Science & Medical Journalism Program and a blogger.
Peter Lipson is a physician and a blogger on Denialism blog. He will lead the workshop Blogging101 – how to get started and co-moderate the session on Anonymity, Pseudonymity – building reputation online.
Troy Livingston is the Vice President for Innovation and Learning at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, NC.
Corie Lok is the Overlord on Nature Network which she will show-and-tell.
Robert Luhn is the Communications Coordinator at the National Center for Science Education.
Kristian Lum is a student of Statistics at Duke.
Evelyn Lynge is the Co-President of the Jacksonville branch of the The American Association of University Women.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 4

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Karen James is the Director of Science for The Beagle Project, writes the Beagle Project Blog and also works full time at the Natural History Museum in London doing original research in the Department of Botany. At the conference, Karen will be on two panels: Hey, You Can’t Say That! and Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Anne Jefferson is a hydrogeologist at UNC-Charlotte and blogs on Watershed Hydrogeology Blog.
Clinton Jenkins is an ecologist and researcher in the Pimm group at the Nicholas School of the Environment.
Sandra Jenkins is coming from Maysville, NC.
Erin Johnson is one of our Seed Overlords – she manages Scienceblogs.com and she will do a demo of it, as well as co-moderate the session Science blogging networks – what works, what does not?
Douglas Johnston is an instructor in the SPH Executive Masters Program at UNC.
Paul Jones is a professor of journalism at UNC, director of Ibiblio.com, a blogger, and a co-organizer of the first two Science Blogging Conferences.
Tatjana Jovanovic-Grove is a biologist and artist. She will co-moderate two sessions: Open Access in the networked world: experience of developing and transition countries and How to paint your own blog images.
Djordje Jeremic is the 9th grade homeschooled son of Tatjana Jovanovic-Grove.
Betul Kacar is a PhD student at Emory University and blogs on Counter Minds.
Molly Keener works in the Coy C. Carpenter Library at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and runs their news blog.
Tom Kibler (together with his wife Patricia), runs Campbell-Kibler Associates, Inc.
Sheril Kirshenbaum is a marine biologist, freelance writer, and a dear neighborly SciBling, blogging next door at The Intersection.
Peggy Kolm blogs on Biology in Science Fiction, The Road Less Traveled and Women in Science and will co-moderate the session on Science Fiction on Science Blogs?
Heidi Koschwanez is a student in the Center for Biomolecular and Tissue Engineering at Duke.
Carolyn Kotlas is the Academic Outreach Consultant at UNC-Chapel Hill Information Technology Services.
David Kroll is a Professor and Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the BRITE Center at NC Central University, as well as one of the co-organizers of ScienceOnline’09.
Anna Kushnir recently got her PhD in virology at Harvard and is now an intern with the Nature Network, where she writes her blog Lab Life. She will co-moderate the session Science blogging networks – what works, what does not?

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 3

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Kevin Emamy is coming to do a demo of his CiteULike reference management platform.
Kay Endriss teaches statistics in Career Center High School in Winston-Salem (see the Wikipedia page).
Martin Fenner is the Clinical Fellow in Oncology at Hannover Medical School in Germany. He blogs on Gobbledygook and will lead a session on Providing public health and medical information to all.
Matt Ford is a writer for Nobel Intent and will co-moderate a session Science blogging without the blog?
Suzanne Franks is my SciBling – Zuska. She will co-moderate a session on Gender in science — online and offline
Kim Gainer teaches English at Radford College and writes fantasy fiction.
Patty Gainer is Kim’s daughter and, like her Mom, this will be her third time at the conference. Since last year, she has graduated from Radford High School and is now a student at New River Community College.
Kevin Gamble is the Chief Technology Officer for the American Distance Education Consortium. He is also the Project Director for the National Science Foundation Advanced Internet Satellite Extension Project (AISEP) and Associate Director of the National eXtension Initiative at NCSU. And he blogs on High Touch.
Henry Gee is the senior editor at Nature and blogs on The End Of The Pier Show. He will co-moderate the session on Alternative careers: how to become a journal editor.
gg blogs on Skulls in the Stars and runs The Giant’s Shoulders carnival. He will co-moderate the session Web and the History of Science.
Johnathan Gitlin is a writer for Ars Technica and will co-moderate a session Science blogging without the blog?
Rob Gluck blogs on Mindshavings.
Miriam Goldstein is a doctoral student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and writes The Oyster’s Garter.
Mary Jane Gore is the Senior Science Writer at The Duke Medicine Office of News and Communications.
Xan Gregg works at SAS Institute and blogs on FORTH GO.
Grrrlscientist is my SciBling, over on Living the Scientific Life. She will co-moderate the session on Nature blogging.
Salman Hameed is an astronomer and Assistant Professor of Integrated Science & Humanities at Hampshire College, Massachusetts. He blogs on Science and Religion News.
Steven Hamelly is a Quality Assurance/Regulatory Affairs Expert in Chapel Hill (until recently at BearingPoint).
Roger Harris is Online Social Media Manager at Capstrat and blogs on TwitterThoughts. He will lead a workshop Blogging102 – how to make your blog better and do a show-and-tell on how to put your story on a dozen networks, sites and services in 15 minutes or less.
Brian Hawkins is a Blood-Brain Barrier researcher at the National Institute of Environemental Health Sciences (NIEHS). See his webpage and blog.
Katherine Haxton is a Lecturer in Chemistry at Keele University in the UK and she blogs on Endless Possibilities v2.0.
Jay Heinz is a Multimedia Designer at the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center and writes on their blog.
Victor Henning will do a demo of his Mendeley reference manager platform.
Brad Herring is a nanotechnology afficionado at The Museum of Life and Science in Durham.
Anne-Marie Hodge is an undergraduate student working towards a dual Zoology/Conservation Biology degree (minoring in Ecology and Anthropology) at Auburn University and she blogs on Pondering Pikaia. She will be participating on the panel Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Elissa Hoffman teaches biology in Appleton East High School, WI, where she runs hes classroom blog Endless Forms Most Beautiful.
John Hogenesch is an Associate Professor of Pharmacology and the Associate Director of the Penn Genome Frontiers Institute at University of Pennsylvania. He is of my “tribe” – a circadian researcher, and an aficionado of projects like Gene Wiki, WikiProteins, WikiPathways, and WikiGenes and BioGPS. He will co-moderate a session Community intelligence applied to gene annotation.
Stephanie Holmgren is the Biomedical Science Librarian at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.
Ernie Hood is a freelance science writer and he does a weekly science radio show – Radio In Vivo – at the local radio station WCOM-FM.
Bill Hooker is also coming for the third time – he blogs on Open Reading Frame and will co-moderate a session on Open Access publishing: present and future.
Carlos Hotta teaches at Universidade de Sao Paulo in Brazil and blogs on Brontossauros em meu jardim. He will present a demo of Lablogatorios, the Brazilian science blogging network.
Zoe Hoyle works at the USDA Forest Service – Southern Research Station in Asheville, NC.
James Hrynyshyn is my SciBlings and a freelance science journalist based in western North Carolina. His blog is The Island of Doubt.
Tom Hughes is the Managing Editor in the Medical Center News Office at UNC.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants 2

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Let’s highlight some more of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Russ Campbell is the Communications Officer at Burroughs Wellcome Fund.
Patricia Campbell is the powerhouse behind the Campbell-Kibler Associates, the FairerScience and the FairerScience blog.
Roy Campbell is the Director of Exhibits at North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.
Paul Cancellieri is a science teacher at Durant Road Middle School and he also writes a blog – Scripted Spontaneity.
Bill Cannon runs the new Science in the Triangle site.
Yang Cao is a Pediatric Epidemiology researcher at NIEHS.
Reed Cartwright is a postdoc at North Carolina State University, he blogs on De Rerum Natura and makes sure that The Panda’s Thumb looks good and functions flawlessly. He was also the editor of the last year’s edition of the science blogging anthology The Open Laboratory: The Best Science Writing on Blogs 2007.
Tiffany Cartwright (yes, she just happens to be married to Reed) is a blogger.
Christian Casper is a PhD student in the Program in Communication, Rhetoric, and Digital Media at North Carolina State University. He will co-moderate the session Rhetoric of science: print vs. web.
Anne Casper is a post-doc in Microbiology and Molecular Genetics at Duke, and is a SPIRE’s program fellow at UNC-CH.
Elle Cayabyab Gitlin runs Evoque and blogs on Ars Technica.
Kelly Chi is a freelance science and technology journalist.
Helen Chickering is the NBC News Channel Health and Science Correspondent, a freelance TV producer, and a board member of SCONC.
Sally Church runs Icarus Consultants, Inc and the Pharma Strategy Blog.
Chris Clouser is the Science Librarian for Indiana University of Pennsylvania and writes The Logical Operator blog.
Clinton Colmenares is the National Media Strategist in the Medical Center News Office at UNC.
Jayme Corbell is a chemist at Catalent.
Daniel Cressey is a writer for Nature News.
Cynthia Cudaback is an independent consultant at Ocean Consulting.
Ann Marie Cunningham is the executive director of Talking Science.
Marta Dark-McNeese is a physicist and a Professor at Spelman College.
Cathy Davies teaches Food Science at Gloucester County College and blogs on Lab Cat.
Erin Davis writes Spittoon, the blog of 23andMe.
Lynn Davis is the Instructional Designer at the Friday Center for Continuing Education.
Allen Dodson is a Science Policy Fellow and writes for ASBMB Advocate: A Monthly E-Newsletter on Public Affairs of The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.
Danielle Duma is a Molecular Endocrinology researcher at the National Institute of Environemental Health Sciences (NIEHS).
John Dupuis is the science librarian at York University, Toronto and blogs on Confessions of a Science Librarian. He will co-moderate the session on How to search scientific literature.
Sam Dupuis is John’s son who, while still in high school, writes a science blog Science of Sorts on My Mind.

ScienceOnline’09 – introducing the participants

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So, let’s highlight some of the participants of this year’s ScienceOnline09 conference:
Eva Amsen is a newly-minted PhD in Biochemistry at the University of Toronto, and she blogs on Easternblot, Expression Patterns and Musicians and Scientists.
Melissa Anley-Mills is the News Director in the Office of Research and Development at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Samia Ansari is a Biochemistry Undergraduate student at the University of Georgia, and she blogs on 49 percent. She will co-moderate the session on Race in science – online and offline.
Apryl Bailey is the Creative Director and Production Manager at SciVee.tv. She will co-moderate the session Not just text – image, sound and video in peer-reviewed literature and will also do a demo of SciVee.tv.
Stacy Baker teaches high-school biology. She also writes a blog about the use of technology in teaching – Using Blogs in Science Education – and runs, together with her students, a classroom blog Extreme Biology (which just received the EduBlog2008 Award). Miss Baker and eight of her students will lead the session Science online – middle/high school perspective (or: ‘how the Facebook generation does it’?).
Enrico Maria Balli is one of the founders and the CEO of Sissa Medialab in Trieste, Italy.
Meredith Barrett is a Ph.D Student in the Duke University Program in Ecology at the Nicholas School of the Environment and writes (from the field, in Madagascar) her blog Lemur health & conservation. She will participate in the panel Blogging adventure: how to post from strange locations.
Karl Leif Bates is the Editor of Duke Research which is published by the Duke University Office of News & Communications and is a SCONC board member.
Arati Bechtel writes the JMP Blog. JMP is Statistical Discovery Software from SAS.
Mike Bergin is well known to the readers of my blog, as the blogger at 10000birds and the manager of I and the Bird blog carnival. He will moderate the session Blog carnivals: why you should participate.
Peter Binfield is a physicist and the Managing Editor of PLoS ONE. He will co-moderate the sessions on Reputation, authority and incentives. Or: How to get rid of the Impact Factor and Alternative careers: how to become a journal editor.
Larry Boles works at the Museum of Life + Science in Durham and blogs on their MLS Animal Department blog.
Mauricio Borgen is the IT Administrator at Athenix Corp.
Jean-Claude Bradley is a professor of chemistry at Drexel University. He is the pioneer of the Open Notebook Science movement, which you can see in action on his blog Useful Chemistry and the lab wiki UsefulChem Project. He will co-moderate the session Open Notebook Science – how to do it right (if you should do it at all)
Bjorn Brembs is a neuroscientist at Freie Universitat Berlin and a science blogger. He will co-moderate the sessions on Reputation, authority and incentives. Or: How to get rid of the Impact Factor and Open Access publishing: present and future.
Chris Brodie is the vice president of corporate communications at the North Carolina Biotechnology Center and one of the founders and board members of SCONC.
Daniel Brown is an IRTA Fellow in the Polypeptide Hormone Action Group at the National Institute of Environmental Health Science and blogs on Biochemicalsoul.
Christine Bruske-Flowers works in the Office of Communications for the National Institute of Environmental Health Science.
Steve Burnett is a musician, an acoustic ecologist and a blogger here in the Triangle.

ScienceOnline’09 – the Women’s Networking Event

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networking-event-flyer.jpgFrom WiSE (Women in Science and Engineering) of Duke:

WiSE is partnering with ScienceOnline’09, a national science blogging and communication conference, to host a Triangle-wide networking event for women scientists, engineers, educators, researchers, science writers, and students. This event also includes many of our local women’s groups and promises to be a networking extravaganza. Following a networking reception with free light eats and drinks, there will be a presentation by our guest speaker, Rebecca Skloot, a freelance science writer, contributing editor at Popular Science, and correspondent for PBS’s NOVA scienceNOW. Our goal in hosting this networking event is to bring together local women’s groups to support joint efforts in community outreach and to support communication of science information and ideas to the general public.

If you have already registered for ScienceOnline’09 and checked the “I will attend Friday events” box, you are already registered for this event as well. If you are not registered for ScienceOnline’09, but you live in the area and want to attend the WiSE event only, you can register for it here. And you don’t need to be a woman 😉
The program goes like this:
6:30 pm Doors open
7 – 8 pm Networking reception and informational booths with local women’s groups
8 – 9 pm Keynote talk by Rebecca Skloot: “Women, science, and storytelling: The immortal life of Henrietta Lacks (a.k.a. HeLa), and one woman’s journey from scientist to writer”
I hear there will be good wine served there as well….

ScienceOnline’09 – interview with Danielle Lee

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There is a new interview in the series by the students in Miss Baker’s class: An Interview with Danielle Lee, Author of Urban Science Adventures. Danielle Lee will be moderating a session about Race in Science.

ScienceOnline’09 – Friday Morning Coffee

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The first 25 registered participants who sign up here will get to taste some delicious coffee and discuss the science of coffee at Counter Culture Coffee in Durham (map) on Friday, January 16th at 9:30am. Use the same wiki page also to organize carpooling (locals, please offer to give rides to the guests).

ScienceOnline’09 – the WiSE Friday event

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As you know, a portion of the Friday program at ScienceOnline09 is organized by Duke WiSE. They have now put up a webpage with additional information.
In short, if you have signed up for the conference and checked the “I will attend the Friday evening event” box on the registration form you are fine – no need to do anything else, just show up.
But if you are local and want to attend ONLY the WiSE event (and you have not registered for SO’09), you need to register by using this online form.
The program?
6:30 pm Registration
7 – 8 pm Networking reception and informational booths with local women’s groups
8 – 9 pm Keynote talk by Rebecca Skloot

ScienceOnline’09 – Danielle Lee in the media

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Danielle Lee was profiled in The St.Louis American the other day. Among else, the article says:

Recently, she was invited to co-moderate a panel on diversity in the sciences at the third annual ScienceOnline conference in Research Triangle Park, N.C. In January, scientists, science bloggers, journalists and students from around the world will meet to explore how online and digital technologies influence science communication and education, and vice versa.

ScienceOnline09 on Radio In Vivo

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As you know, Anton Zuiker, David Kroll and I were on the radio earlier today, chatting for an hour with Ernie Hood of Radio In Vivo, here in Carrboro.
We discussed science communication, education, publishing, blogging, popularization, journalism, social networking, Second Life, etc. The focus was on ScienceOnline09, but we also mentioned The Open Laboratory anthologies (2006, 2007 and 2008), LabLit.com, the NCCU BRITE, Duke Health, Inside Duke Medicine, PLoS, BlogTogether, SCONC and, of course, our blogs.
Try to find an hour of peace and quiet and listen to the show here (mp3).
And then check out the podcasts of the old Radio In Vivo science shows – there are some excellent previous shows with great scientists.

Update:
David took some pictures – you can see them here.

Reminder….

Tune in if you can, or listen online later…

The Open Laboratory 2008 – all the submissions fit to print

It’s midnight! So, the submission form is now closed.
Over the past year we have collected hundreds of excellent entries for the anthology – thanks to all who made the submissions.
Jennifer Rohn has lined up some star people to judge all the entries, and in the end, we’ll have the best 50 (plus a poem and a cartoon/image) published in a book with Lulu.com. We will announce the winners in a couple of weeks or so, but in the meantime, bookmark this post – this is the best of science blogging for the year!
And if the winter break is long enough for you to read all of these entries and still crave more – you can read the The Open Laboratory: The Best Writing on Science Blogs 2006 and The Open Laboratory: The Best Science Writing on Blogs 2007 all over again. We are hoping to have the book out and ready for sale before the ScienceOnline09 so we can sell some copies right then and there.
So, here are ALL the entries for The Open Laboratory 2008:
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49 percent: Textbooks and reproduction– why they gotta embellish?
49 percent: *groan*
49 percent: She said to no one in particular
A Blog Around the Clock: The Nobel Prize conundrum
A Blog Around The Clock: Science vs. Britney Spears
A Blog Around The Clock: Domestication – it’s a matter of time (always is for me, that’s my ‘hammer’ for all nails)
A Blog Around The Clock: Scientists are Excellent Communicators (‘Sizzle’ follow-up)
A Blog Around The Clock: Why do earthworms come up to the surface after the rain?
A Blog Around The Clock: Clock Classics: It all started with the plants
A Blog Around The Clock: The Future is Here and it is Bright: Interview with Anne-Marie Hodge
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Expect The Unexpected
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Lost In Translation? Part I: What Is Incommensurability And Why Should I Care?
A canna’ change the laws of physics: Lost In Translation? Part II: Kuhnian Incommensurability
A Developing Passion: Wunderpus photogenicus!
A Developing Passion: Realize your potential!
A Free Man: Weird Fishes and the Origin of Fingers
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: The MMR vaccine and autism – truth, lies and the media
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: Breath-taking insanity
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: Transatlantic STDs
A Free Man: Science Tuesday: In Response to an Animal Rights Apologist
A k8, a cat, a mission: Providing and nurturing
A k8, a cat, a mission: We can count on each other
A k8, a cat, a mission: Open Access Day
A Mad Tea-Party: Birds of a feather?
A Mad Tea-Party: Bigfoot, Nessie, and the 40-hour Work Week
A Mad Tea-Party: Swimming With The Big Kids
A Meandering Scholar: Braindrain
A Somewhat Old, But Capacious Handbag: Maladaptation
Aardvarchaeology: The Strange Fate of the First Christian Burials on Gotland
Aardvarchaeology: Investigating the Field of Saint Olaf
Adventures in Applied Math: Things I Love about My Job
Adventures in Applied Math: Game Theory and Human Behavior, Part I
Adventures in Applied Math: Game Theory and Human Behavior, Part II
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Girls, boys, and Math
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Research with vulnerable populations: considering the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (part 1).
Adventures in Ethics and Science: Research with vulnerable populations: considering the Bucharest Early Intervention Project (part 2).
Adventures in Ethics and Science: The Hellinga Retractions (part 1): when replication fails, what should happen next?
Adventures in Ethics and Science: The Hellinga retractions (part 2): trust, accountability, collaborations, and training relationships.
Aetiology: What’s it like to work an Ebola outbreak?
Aetiology: Where did syphilis come from?
All My Faults are Stress-Related: Data, Interpretations and Field Work
All My Faults are Stress-Related: Analogies, analog modeling, and squashed chocolate
Almost Diamonds: Diversity Now
Amphidrome: Crabs and Barnacles of the Texas Panhandle
Antimatter: The Big Bang and the Mind of God
Antimatter: Hamilton and maths week in Ireland
Antimatter: Zeilinger in Ireland
Antimatter: Town, gown and college life
Antimatter: Standard Model at Trinity College
Antimatter: LHC: Hawking v Higgs
Antimatter: Science week, Walton and the LHC
Antimatter: Do anti-depressants work?
Antimatter: The Standard Model
Antimatter: Supersymmetry
Antimatter: Cambridge conference review
Antimatter: Hubble puzzle
Antimatter: Hubble solution
Antimatter: The Denial of Global Warming
Archaeoastronomy: A Sapphic Ode to Pan scientiae
Archaeoporn: Moral Dilemas in Teaching Anthropology
Archaeoporn:
A Reivew of Methodology in ‘Biblical Entheogens’

Archaeoporn: Discovery Channel, Teaching the Debate
Archaeoporn: Muslim Sailors, A Skeptical Redux
Archy: A Century of Tunguska
Archy: On Planets X and Names
Backreaction: We have only ourselves to judge on each other
Backreaction: Blaise Pascal, Florin Perier, and the Puy de Dome experiment
Backreaction: The Equivalence Principle
Backreaction: The Spirits that We Called
Backyard Arthropod Project: Snow Fly – Chionea valga
Backyard Arthropod Project: Carpet Beetle Larva
Bad Astronomy: Is science faith-based?
Bad Astronomy: WR 104: A nearby gamma-ray burst?
Bad Astronomy: Vaccines do not cause autism!
Bayblab: Fact or Fiction: Tryptophan Turkey Sleep
Bayblab: A History of Beardism and the Science that Backs It
Biocurious: We need to stop pigeon-holing science
BioJobBlog: Academia: A Feudal System That Is Running on Empty
Biological Ramblings: New species in 2008
Biological Ramblings: Avian relationships – What do we know?
Blind.Scientist: How to improve scientific software?
Blogfish: Saving the ocean with guilt or desire?
Blogging the PhD: Multidiscipline
Bootstrap Analysis: Malnourished waterfowl dying in Michigan-Ontario
Boston blog: What is fair play in the blogo/commentosphere?
BrainBlogger: The Human Injury of Lost Objectivity
Brontossauros em meu Jardim: Personal Genomes will be the new horoscope
Bug Girl’s Blog: Do those mosquito zapper things really work?
Bug Girl’s Blog: Pubic Lice: ‘Sea monkeys in your pants’
Building confidence: Big data: an informaticians best friend
Building confidence: We need to create a market for genetic-association data
Cabinet of Wonders: A Rule of Thumb
Carbon Nation: The Giant’s Shoulders: Edwin Salpeter edition
Catalogue of Organisms: The Strangest of Spiders
Catalogue of Organisms: The Origins of Flowers
Catalogue of Organisms: Conversations with Cothurnocystis
Catalogue of Organisms: Are You Sucking on a Lemon or a Lime?
Catalogue of Organisms: Eating Mum from the Inside Out
Charles Darwin’s blog: If only I’d had a magic results machine in 1836…
Charles Darwin’s Blog: Someone should invent a device to look at the micro world
Chem-bla-ics: Open{Data|Source|Standards} is not enough: we need Open Projects
Clastic Detritus: Petroleum Resources and the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)
Cocktail Party Physics: tit for tat
Cocktail Party Physics: hot capillary action
Coding Horror: How Should We Teach Computer Science?
Coding Horror: The Years of Experience Myth
Coding Horror: I Repeat: Do Not Listen to Your Users
Coding Horror: Designing For Evil
Coding Horror: The Greatest Invention in Computer Science
Coffee & Conservation: Know your coffee birds: Jacu
Coffee Talk: What motherhood has taught me
Cognitive Daily: Changing belief in free will can cause students to cheat
Cognitive Daily: How to make your eye feel like it’s closed, when it’s actually open
Cognitive Daily: Will video games solve sex-discrimination in science?
Cognitive Daily: Toddlers play with impossibly small toys as if they’re the real thing
Cognitive Daily: The origins of the study of memory
Cognitive Daily: A baby’s psychological development at age 6 months
Cosmic Variance: The First Quantum Cosmologist
Cosmic Variance: Dark Photons
Cosmic Variance: The Physics of Chocolate
DamnGoodTechnician: Why I’m a tech
Dara Sosulski’s blog: Quantum Keats
Denialism blog: My New Product: All Natural Pb
Denialism blog: Why good medicine requires materialism
Denialism blog: There is no such thing as alternative medicine
Denialism blog: I’m a holistic doctor
Denialism blog: Were the ancients fools?
Denialism blog: Fountain pens
Denialism blog: Try and beat this one, alties!
Dear Blue Lobster: Bloop: A Crustacean Phenomenon?
Deep Sea News: Mommy, Where Do Dwarf Male Harems Come From?
Deep Sea News: The Big 3: Shrimp, Tuna, and Salmon
Deep Sea News: Dumping Pharmaceutical Waste In The Deep Sea
Deep Sea News: You Should Fear and Respect the Radula
Deep Sea News: An Update On Nautilus Mining
Deep Sea News: Does Lightning Kill Marine Animals?
Deep Sea News: Hydromedusa Mounts Ninja Style Invasion
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: The Hierarchical Structure of Bad Writing
Deep Thoughts and Silliness: The Deeper Meaning of a Residual Plot
Digital Cuttlefish: Danger! Warning!
Digital Cuttlefish: The singularity can’t come soon enough
Digital Cuttlefish: The Evolutionary Biology Valentine’s Day Poem
Digital Cuttlefish: Apology 130 to William Shakespeare
Digital Cuttlefish: I Am The Very Model Of A Devious Creationist
Digital Cuttlefish: How Chromosome Numbers Change
Digital Cuttlefish: Oh Ye Of Little Faith
Digital Cuttlefish: I Am Charles Darwin
Dreams and hopes of a (post doc) scientist: Why I (shouldn’t) don’t tell too many people what I (really) do
Dreams and hopes of a (post doc) scientist: TLR, PPR, cytokines and signaling
Dr. Jekyll & Mrs. Hyde: Why I blog….
Dr. Mom, My Adventures as a Mommy-Scientist: The Long and Winding Road
Dr Petra’s blog: Well, you can tell by the way I use my walk I’m a vaginal orgasm woman, no time to talk
Dr Petra’s blog: Superdrug and sex supplements – should you take Viapro?
Dr Petra’s blog: How latest UK trafficking statistics don’t quite add up
Dr Petra’s blog: Ooh! Ooh! Ooh! Watch the media get into a feeding frenzy over the latest g-spot research
DrugMonkey (PhysioProf): Academic Science: Not A Care Bears Fucking Tea Party
DrugMonkey (PhysioProf): Why Comrade PhysioProf Loves Teaching Medical Physiology
DrugMonkey (DrugMonkey): Most Scientists are Perfectly Happy Not Publishing in GlamourMagz
DrugMonkey (DrugMonkey): It Doesn’t Hurt a Bit to Be ‘That Guy’
Dynamic Earth: Expanding Earth and the Conspiracy of Science
Dynamics of Cats: Physics Made Magical
Earth Impacts: Home Climate
Earth Impacts: Your Radioactive Kitchen
Earth Impacts: Stop Illegal Climate Immigration
Ed Boyden’s Blog: Research as a Community-Building Activity
evolgen: The Probability of Winning the NBA Draft Lottery
Effect Measure: More on the human trials of a ‘universal’ flu vaccine
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part I
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part II
Effect Measure: Important new flu paper in Cell: part III
Effect Measure: What killed people in the 1918 flu?
Effect Measure: The problem of testing the effectiveness of bird flu vaccines
Effect Measure: Why fever screening at airports is unlikely to work
Effect Measure: Why the Right Wing attacks science
eTrilobite: Walcott’s Quarry #28: Council of Hallucigenia (cartoon)
evolgen: How many genes do you share with your twentieth cousin?
Evolutionary Novelties: Gould: Pluralism by monism
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part One
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part II
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part Three
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Part Four
Evolutionblog: Report on the Sixth International Conference on Creationism, Conclusion
Evolving Thoughts: Darwin, God and chance
Evolving Thoughts: Fallacies on Fallacies
Evolving Thoughts: Aristotle on the mayfly
Evolving Thoughts: On Ontology and Metaphysics: Substance Abuse
Expression Patterns: What will you be?
Expression Patterns: Last Saturday
Expression Patterns: This is my brain on grad school
Expression Patterns: How to get scientists to adopt web 2.0 technologies
Extreme Biology: Humorless Homework
FairerScience: Sid the Science Kid: A Review
Female Science Professor: Journal Matchmaking
FemaleScienceProfessor: The Best Woman
Fine Structure: Parton Distribution Functions
Freelancing science: Freelancing science – today and tomorrow
Freelancing science: By any measure I’m average at most
Further thoughts: Disturbance and recovery in tropical dry forests
Further thoughts: Rethinking the way we study ecological succession
Further thoughts: What is natural? Reinterpreting rivers in the eastern US
Further thoughts: Teaching undergrads how to use online literature
Further thoughts: Bt cotton and the evolution of resistance
Giovanna Di Sauro’s blog: Who’s afraid of Bisphenol A? (part 1)
Giovanna Di Sauro’s blog: Who’s afraid of Bisphenol A? (part 2)
Good Math, Bad Math: The Genius of Donald Knuth: Typesetting with Boxes and Glue
Green Gabbro: The Igneous Petrology of Ice Cream
Green Gabbro: The Metamorphic Petrology of Ice Cream
Green Gabbro: The Sedimentary Geology of Ice Cream
Greg Laden’s Blog: Cultural Evolution from Mosquitos to Worm Grunting
Greg Laden’s blog: Size and Scaling in Hominid Evolution
Greg Laden’s blog: Stone Age Graveyard Reveals Lifestyles of a Green Sahara
Greg Laden’s blog: The Scientific, Political, Social, and Pedagogical Context for the claim that ‘Race does not exist.’
Greg Laden’s blog: The Political Gender Gap
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel: To Equine Things There is a Season (guest post by Barn Owl)
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel: Otocephaly in the Guinea Pig
Guadalupe Storm-Petrel: Earliest Axons in the Early Bird Embryo
GumbyTheCat: The Texas Two-Step
GumbyTheCat: An Open Letter To Creationists
Highly Allochthonous: Where the Earth’s magnetic field comes from
Highly Allochthonous: Active, dormant, and extinct volcanoes
Hope for Pandora: Dear Reviewer
Huckleberry Days: What’s flowering in the Delta this week: wild morning-glory
Humans in Science: National Science Policies – Upheaval in France
Humans in Science: Green tea shenanigans
Hypo-theses: Geology and Beer
Ilovebacteria.com blog: Evolution isn’t perfect…
Isis the Scientist: Isis’s Super Family Fun Day
It’s a Micro World after all: Primum non nocere – Part I
It’s a Micro World after all: Celebrity Death Match – Biodiesel vs. Bioethanol (Part I)
It’s a Micro World after all: Celebrity Death Match – Biodiesel vs Bioethanol (Part II)
It’s a Micro World after all: Bacterial Farts – Part Deux
I was lost but now I live here: Departmental retreats: academia with a twist of karaoke
I was lost but now I live here: The future of science, gradical change, and tools for the people
Jacks of Science: Using Adobe Photoshop for Research and Profit
Jacks of Science: White Stuff and Black Stuff That People Like
Joel on Software: Architecture astronauts take over
Juniorprof: Why I support open access
Juniorprof: Postdoc to PI transition
Knowing and Doing: No One Programs Any More
Knowing and Doing: Scripting Languages, Software Development, and Novice Programmers
Knowing and Doing: Math and Computing as Art
Laelaps: Reaction to Darwin’s Descent
Laelaps: Geese from barnacles
Laelaps: Thomas Jefferson’s All-American incognitum
Laelaps: Wallowing dinosaurs and birds on the 5th day
Laelaps: The life, and death, of Ota Benga
Laelaps: John Daniel, the civilized gorilla
Laelaps: Evolutionary Phreno-Geology
Laelaps: Who scribbled all over Darwin’s work?
Lecturer Notes: Getting Anyone to expand their horizons is hard
Life, Birds, and Everything: Do we see what bees see?
Life of a Lab Rat: Squeeze Me
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Northeastern Bats Mysteriously Dying in the Thousands
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): There Are More Giraffe Species Than You Think
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Audubon’s Aviary: Portraits of Endangered Species
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): America’s Food Availability Crisis
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Science Blogging for Scientists: Planting the Seed
Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted): Lovebird Behavior: Nature or Nurture?
Lunartalks: The Gordian Worm (or what Gordon Brown is doing to Britain).
Mad Scientist, Jr.: Brain Extractions
Magma Cum Laude: Cenozoic magmatism and the subduction of the Farallon Slab
Mario’s Entangled Bank: The Year of Evolution in the age of Open Access
Marmorkrebs: How Marmorkrebs can make the world a better place
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: The Future of Science
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: Open science
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: Why the world needs quantum mechanics
Michael Nielsen’s Blog: Quantum computing for everyone
Microecos: Dust. Wind. Dude. Or, the comparative social phenology of Girls Gone Wild and Socrates
Mild Opinons: Ideal free ducks
Mindshavings: The Impossible Lamp
Mind the Gap: In which two dreams and an episode of CSI change the course of history
Mind the Gap: In which my dreams come true
Mind the Gap: In which we retreat
Mind the Gap: In which words stick
Mind the Gap: In which science becomes a sport – hypothetically speaking
Mind The Gap: In which work follows me on holiday
Mind the Gap: In which I am star-struck by the invisible world
Mindshavings: Further Recursion Excursion
Minor Revisions: To Whom it May Concern
My Favourite Places: Pepijn’s Livingroom Urban Research Program (PLURP)
Nano2Hybrids: Girly Girls in Science
Nano2Hybrids: Ethical Scientist Code
Nano2Hybrids: What IS a carbon nanotube?
Neuroanthropology: Poverty Poisons the Brain
Neuroanthropology: Girls closing math gap?: Troubles with intelligence #1
Neuroanthropology: Studying Sin
Neuroanthropology: Cultural Aspects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder: Thinking on Meaning and Risk
NeuroDojo: Making mimetics scientific
Neurophilosophy: Wilder Penfield: Neural Cartographer
Neurotic Physiology: Uber Coca, by Sigmund Freud
Neurotic Physiology: Passage of an Iron Rod through the Head
Neurotic Physiology: Diabetes Insipidus as a Sequel to a Gunshot Wound of the Head
Neurotic Physiology: Broca’s Area, 1865
Neurotic Physiology: Weird Science Friday REDUX
Neurotopia 2.0: An Essay on the Shaking Palsy
Neurotopia 2.0: Warm fuzzies and getting to know your profs
Neurotopia 2.0: Birds of a Feather in Academia
NoR: Feature Creep I
Not Exactly Rocket Science: Scientists heart journalists? Plus a quick guide to dealing with the media
Not Exactly Rocket Science: Space Invader DNA jumped across mammalian genomes
Nothing’s Shocking: The laboratory isn’t a safe place for experiments anymore
Nothing’s Shocking: Poster session paparazzi
NOVA Geoblog: Perspectives on coastal tectonics
Observations of a Nerd: Having Some Fun With Evolution
Observations of a Nerd: Religion v. Science: the fallacy of Intelligent Design
Of Two Minds: How to Sex a Chick
On Becoming a Domestic and Laboratory Goddess: Where Dr. Isis Tells the Students to Sack Up….
One Big Lab: Envisioning the scientific community as One Big Lab
Open Reading Frame: An Open Access partisan’s view of ‘Electronic Publication and the Narrowing of Science and Scholarship’
O’Really?: Famous for fifteen people
O’Really?: If Science was an Olympic Sport…
Ouroboros: The evolution of negligible senescence
Over Land, Under Sea: Ode to a Horseshoe Crab
Panda’s Thumb: Choosey Peahens Choose Evolution
Panda’s Thumb: ID: Intelligent Design as Imitatio Dei (report on the 2007 ‘Wistar Retrospective Symposium’)
Panda’s Thumb: A Follow-Up on Evolution and Thermodynamics
Panda’s Thumb: Scientific Vacuity of ID: Lactose Digestion in E. coli
Panthera studentessa: What ecology is NOT
Partially Attended: Why the LHC is not really that impressive
Pharyngula: Old scientists never clean out their refrigerators
Pharyngula: Snake segmentation
Pharyngula: Evolving snake fangs
Pharyngula: Epigenetics
Pharyngula: Amphioxus and the evolution of the chordate genome
Pharyngula: Reproductive history writ in the genome
Pharyngula: Plant and animal development compared
Pharyngula: Where do the hagfish fit in?
Pharyngula: Reprogramming the pancreas
Pharyngula: Basics: Sonic Hedgehog
Pharyngula: My connection to Sonic Hedgehog
Physiology physics woven fine: Neural Networking, Alzheimer’s Disease and Memory Share a Few Things
Plus magazine – news from the world of maths: United Kingdom – Nil Points
Podblack Blog: The Specialness Of Species
Podblack Blog: Looking Good – Scientifically
Podblack Blog: Smart Bitches, Not Meerly Sex
Podblack Blog: She’s Already Got Science – Women, Skepticism And The Need For More Research
Podblack Blog: Political Punditry on McCain’s Magical Thinking
Podblack Blog: The Sarah Silverman Of Skepticism
Podblack Blog: Classic Science Paper: Belief in Fortune Telling Amongst College Students
Podblack Blog: Political Punditry on McCain’s Magical Thinking
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part One
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part Two
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part Three
Podblack Blog: Women and Superstitions – Part Four
Podblack Blog: ‘Tis the Season For Superstition
Podblack Blog: Are U(FO) Dreaming Of A Paranormal Christmas?
Pondering Pikaia: Social Clocks: How do cave bats know when it is dark outside?
Potspoon!: The New Environmentally-Friendly (?!?!) Plastic
Prairie Mary: Religion for Scientists
Principles of Neurobiotaxis: The evolution and evolvability of modularity in the brain
Professor Douglas Kell’s blog: To blogin at the bloginning
Providentia: Dr. Fliess’ Patient
Public Rambling: Post-publication journals
Quintessence of Dust: Finches, bah! What about Darwin’s tomatoes?
Rants of a Feminist Engineer: Stories of an academic panel discussion
Reciprocal Space: I hate blogs, bloggers and blogging
Reciprocal Space: The battle for my eternal soul
Reciprocal Space: I depend on the kindness of strangers
Reciprocal Space: I get my kicks from thermodynamicks!
rENNISance woman: Nobody expects…
rENNISance woman: My first Nature paper
rENNISance woman: Submit your neologisms here
Rubor Dolor Calor Tumor: Calor?
Sauropod Vertebra Picture of the Week: Sauropod pneumaticity, the early years
Science After Sunclipse: The Necessity of Mathematics
Science After Sunclipse: Physics Makes a Toy of the Brain
Science After Sunclipse: An Alloy of Pleasures
Science After Sunclipse: Curently Reading: Just Add Exploding Spaceship Edition
Science After Sunclipse: The EmDrive Story, or How to Propel Pseudoscience
Science After Sunclipse: Dawkins and the D-Word
Science After Sunclipse: Cinematic Combinatorics
Science After Sunclipse: Reverse the Baryon Flux Polarity!
Sciencebase Science Blog: Dark Energy
Science behind the scenes: Time to come home, love…
Science behind the scenes: From the Antarctic to biofueling America – Marc Pomeroy
Science behind the scenes: Cam and Kinari Webb
Science Blog: Modern Cosmology
Science in the open: Avoid the pain and embarassment – make all the raw data available
Science in the open: How I got into open science – a tale of opportunism and serendipity
Sciencewomen: Prioritizing research time
Sciencewomen: A reckless proposal, or ‘Scientists are people too, and it’s time we started treating them that way.’
Sciencewomen: Academic foolishness
Sciencewomen: Ask a ScienceBlogger: Why do I blog?
Sciencewomen: Engineer, thy name is enlightenment hero
Sciencewomen: What will academia (need to) look like when gas is $20/gallon?
Sciphu: The Swedish Chlamydia Mystery
See Jane Compute: The care and feeding of research students
Skulls in the Stars: The gallery of failed atomic models, 1903-1913
Skulls in the Stars: What a drag: Arago’s Experiment (1810)
Skulls in the Stars: ‘Interference between different photons never occurs:’ Not! (1963)
Skulls in the Stars: The discovery, rediscovery, and re-rediscovery of computed tomography
Stop Procrastinating: You Can All Sleep Sound Tonight
Stripped Science: Last question (comic strip)
Stripped Science: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2008 (comic strip)
Swans on Tea: ‘Classic’ Timekeeping, Part I
Swans on Tea: ‘Classic’ Timekeeping, Part II
Swans on Tea: ‘Classic’ Timekeeping, Part III
Swans on Tea: Optipessimism
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: Respect Astrology
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: One Gene, One Trait? (Part 1 in a series)
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: One Gene, One Trait? (Part 2)
Tangled Up in Blue Guy: One Gene, One Trait? (Part 3)
Terra Sigilatta: Liveblogging the Vasectomy Chronicles
Terra Sigilatta: Is organic chemistry still relevant in the pre-medical curriculum?
Tetrapod Zoology: Sleep behaviour and sleep postures
The Beagle Project Blog: Genomics and plant evolution: blogging on my own peer reviewed research
The Beagle Project Blog: Detecting natural selection: a pika’s tale
The Beagle Project Blog: Saving Darwin’s muse
The Beagle Project Blog: A guest post by Wallace’s Rottweiler on the 150th anniversary of natural selection.
The Beagle Project Blog: Would that which we call a rose, by a DNA barcode, smell as sweet?
The Bean Chronicles: At home again
The Big Room: A small modification of Koch’s plating method
The Daily Transcript: From Metabolism to Oncogenes and Back – Part I
The Daily Transcript: From Metabolism to Oncogenes and Back – Part II
The Daily Transcript: From Metabolism to Oncogenes and Back – Part III
The Dragon’s Tales: Once Upon the Permian: Gazes of Fear
The Dragon’s Tales: Once Upon the Permian: Beaked Bites of a Lost Lineage
The Dragon’s Tales: The Ecology of the Carbon Age
The Dragon’s Tales: The Caste Ecology of the Age of Carbon
The Dragon’s Tales: Gasping for Paleo Air
The Dragon’s Tales: Were the Basal Archosaurs Endothermic?
The End of the Pier Show: Ashtrays and Authority
The End Of The Pier Show: On The Hardness of Biology
The Filter: Choose Research
The Flying Trilobite: Haldane’s Precambrian Puzzle
The Flying Trilobite: Flying & Asthma
The Flying Trilobite: Support The Beagle Project with Flying Trilobite Reproductions (just the art, instead of a cartoon)
The Flying Trilobite: Haldane’s Precambrian Puzzle (the picture)
The Green Grok: Understanding Oil
The Gulf Stream: The Accidental Locavore
The Ideophone: Migration stories
The Ideophone: Zotero, an Endnote alternative
The Ideophone: Under the spell of ideophones
The Ideophone: Fresh wild melon and meat full of gravy: food texture verbs in G|ui (Khoisan)
The Inverse Square Blog: Friday (Isaac) Newton Blogging: Monday Cosmology Edition
The Inverse Square Blog: 2%: The US Civil War, mathematics, and why we have already lost in Iraq
The Inverse Square Blog: Bad Science Kills People: Bush administration/heroin edition.
The Inverse Square Blog: A Little Weekend Palin/Physics Snark
The Loom: Whales: From So Humble A Beginning…
The Loom: The Clock That Breeds
The Loom: Even Blood Flukes Get Divorced
The Loom: The Allure of Big Antlers
The Loom: The Bird That Dare Not Speak Its Name
The Loom: A New Step In Evolution
The Loom: Dawn of the Picasso fish
The Mouse Trap: Evolution of Life: the eight stage process repeating again and again?
The Mouse Trap: The (eight) basic adaptive problems faced by all animals (esp humans)
The Musings of a Life-Long Scholar: Because I like it
The Musings of a Life-Long Scholar: How I became a Geologist
The Musings of a Life-Long Scholar: Connecting Microscopic and Continental Scales
The Natural Patriot: Biodiversity and the limits to growth
The OpenHelix Blog: The Beginnings of Immunofluorescence
The Other 95%: Right Whale Lice
The Oyster’s Garter: Urochordata, Urochordata, Rah, Rah, Rah!
The Oyster’s Garter: Perverted cannibalistic hermaphrodites haunt the Pacific Northwest!
The Oyster’s Garter: How a coccolithophore without its plates is like a grin without a cat
The RNA Underworld: De novo origination of a gene encoding a functional protein
The Scientific Activist: Why Are Veins Blue?
The Scientific Activist: Do You Want to Be Able to Crap Gold?
The Scientific Activist: Water on Mars, Part 1
The Scientist: On depression–a personal perspective
The Scientist: On the Nature of Networking
The Scientist: We are Stardust
The Sciphu Weblog: Now this is why we need genetic counselors
The Sciphu Weblog: How everything is a mess and still ok
The Sciphu Weblog: Was it all in vain ? The scientific method tale
The Skeptical Alchemist: From chance to function: the story of one gene (part 1)
The Skeptical Alchemist: From chance to function: the story of one gene (part 2)
The Skeptical Alchemist: From chance to function: the story of one gene (part 3)
The Tree of Life: The Fake Science News (or, Spitzer on OA): Eisen Resigns in Disgrace Over Scandal
The Tree of Life: What is so bad about brain doping? Apparently, NIH thinks something is.
The Tree of Life: Freeing My Father’s Scientific Publications
The Tree of Life: Tracing the evolutionary history of Sarah Palin: links to a parasitic nematode and the pathogenic fungus Botryotinia fuckeliana
The Wild Side: Cancer of the Devil
Thesis – with Children: What is Fair?
Thesis – with Children: The Semi-Adult
Thinking is Dangerous: Bluffer’s Guide to Consumer-Related Science Papers
Thoughts from Kansas: King penguin becomes a knight; his relatives are endangered by global warming
Thoughts from Kansas: The business of psychics
Thoughts from Kansas: Back to the framing wars
Thoughts from Kansas: With friends like these, or Tony Campolo gets eaten by the Hitler zombie
Thus Spake Zuska: The Proper Way To Be A Woman In Science
Tomorrow’s Table: The Whirlpool of Scientific Thought
Tomorrow’s Table: 10 Things about GE crops to Scratch From Your Worry List
Tomorrow’s Table: Blogging from Bangladesh, part 5 of 7
Tom Paine’s Ghost: Biochemistry of Halloween: Installment 1
Tom Paine’s Ghost: Freedom of the Genetic Press? Can newly created letters of life’s alphabet be patented?
Uncertain Principles: Physical Theories Squeak When You Chew Them
Uncertain Principles: What Everyone Should Know About Science
Uncertain Principles: The Innumeracy of Intellectuals
Uncertain Principles: We Are Science
Uncertain Principles: Relative Dog Motion
Uncertain Principles: Everything is Relative in the Magic Closet
UsefulChem: Experimental Uncertainty Principle
UsefulChem: Science is about mistrust
Web 2.0 and Semantic Web for Bioinformatics: Open Access, Science Commons, Open Science
What is interesting me today?: Science – the new cool?
What is Life?: Work and Life Balance & Importance of Sleep!
What is Life?: Who am I?
Wired Science: The Nanotech Antidote to Food Poisoning
Wired Science: Semen Proteomics Sheds Light on Loyalty and Evolution
Wired Science: Molecular Evidence that Broccoli Fights Prostate Cancer
Wired Science: Gene Editing Could Make Anyone Immune to AIDS
Wired Science: Experimental Drug Makes the Immune System Revolt Against Cancer
Wired Science: Should Scientists Date People Who Believe in Astrology?
Wired Science: Video: The Biggest Medical Scam Since Alex Chiu’s Immortality Device
Wired Science Blog: Correlations: The Third Branch of Science?
Working the Bench: Publications & Grants Don’t Matter – Just Pedigree
XKCD: Unscientific
XKCD: Height
XKCD: Scientific Fields arranged by Purity
Zimblog: The gender gap in math has disappeared

ScienceOnline’09 on the Radio!

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This Wednesday at 11am, tune in to Radio In Vivo with Ernie Hood at WCOM-FM 103.5 in Carrboro, NC (or check out the podcast online afterwards), because the show will be fantastic:

Radio In Vivo
December 3, 2008
Guests: David Kroll (NCCU), Anton Zuiker (Duke), Bora Zivkovic (PLOS) – co-organizers of ScienceOnline’09
Topic: ScienceOnline’09, coming Jan. 16-18, 2009, Sigma Xi, RTP

Ernie will even open up the phone lines (919-929-9601) for the audience so you can call in to heckle us or ask really tough questions 😉

ScienceOnline’09 – Friday events

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The Friday page for the ScienceOnline09 is not up to date yet, but will be soon.
What is planned?
In the morning, there will be something related to coffee – Coffee Science of sorts. Place and time TBA.
For lunches, you are free to organize yourselves by editing the Friday page.
In the afternoon, we will have a set of Lab Tours starting at 2:30pm and ending around 4pm. BRITE and NC Museum of Natural Science are already set in stone. Several others are still in the process of finalizing the details (e.g., how many participants, etc.). We will soon have the complete list up on the wiki so you can start signing up for them.
The evening program will start with a Friday Fermentable (at Sigma Xi) with these guys (yes, listen to the whole show – it is worth your time) at around 6:00pm. The sign-up page will come up for this soon as well.
Then, WiSE takes over at 6:45pm with registration and a Networking/appetizers/local groups fair event, i.e., come to eat, drink and schmooze. At 8pm, we’ll get into the big room for The Big Speech of the conference – by Rebecca Skloot. Title is still TBA, but it will have something to do with science, women in science, careers and science communication.
Afterwards, I guess we’ll all move accross the road to Radisson bar for some more drinks.
Keep an eye on the Friday page for all of the details over the next several days.

ScienceOnline’09 – important information for international participants

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Eva Amsen uncovered some important information for the international travelers into the USA: International travel info – Science Online ’09:

For those of you who are traveling to the Science Online ’09 conference from Europe, Australia, NZ, South Korea, Singapore, or on a passport from one of those parts of the world, this is of importance:
As of January 12 2009, travelers using the Visa Waiver Program to enter the US (that is when you don’t need to apply for a visa but you get one of those green forms to fill out at the border) will need to register online before their trip.
I had a look at the registration website and you need a ticket before you register. It says it takes 72 hours to process, but since the week of the conference is the first week that the system is mandatory, I would play it safe and get it done earlier. The questions are the exact same ones as normally appear on the green form so it will only take a minute or so to fill out.
Again, this only concerns you if your passport is from one of these countries.

Please check before you fly in, please.

ScienceOnline’09 – from the West

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Hmmm, who is coming from the wild, wild West?
Two from Washington state: Deepak Singh and John McKay.
Two from Oregon: Bill Hooker and Maureen Hoatlin.
From New Mexico: Sol Lederman.
And of course a bunch of Californians: Craig McClain, Erin Davis, Janet Stemwedel, Alex Lee, Rick MacPherson, Neeru Paharia, Miriam Goldstein, Peggy Kolm, Andrew Su, Peter Binfield and Aaron Rowe.

ScienceOnline’09 – Friday events and demos

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Each of the show-and-tell sessions now has its own wiki page so you can start discussions, ask questions from the presenters, etc.
We will also have more information about Friday events soon. The Lab Tours and Food Tours will be in the morning, and the WiSE event in the evening, but you can also use that same page to organize your own events, lunch, carpooling, late-night bar-hopping, etc.

Science and Fiction: What Do You Think?

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Peggy and Stephanie are asking for your input on shaping their ScienceOnline09 session on Science Fiction on Science Blogs.
Go and help them out – just answer a few questions in the comments sections of their blogs.

ScienceOnline09 – Open Access

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Continuing with the Program we have set for theScienceOnline09, here are some sessions dealing with the Open Access, the freedom of information and the world of publishing:
Open Access publishing: present and future:
This session is moderated by Bill Hooker and Bjoern Brembs:

The world of scientific publishing is undergoing rapid change. Where is it now? Where is it going? What will happen to Impact Factors? Will there still be journals 20 years from now? How will a scientific paper look like? Who will be the ‘peers’ in peer review?

Open Access in the networked world: experience of developing and transition countries:
This session is moderated by Danica Radovanovic and Vedran Vucic:

What is innovative and what is challenging regarding the usage of OA e-resources, social Web 2.0 software and media? Does science blogging in Europe (in developed and countries in transition) exist? And what are the forms? Main discussion is through interaction and different practices of participants, to find solution for the burning issue: how to overcome the problem of net/networking in scientific and edu.(online)community?

Providing public health and medical information to all:
This session is moderated by Martin Fenner:

Nowhere is Open Access as important as in the areas of medicine and public health. Health care professional and patients alike are not likely to have access to libraries of elite universities – they may work in hospitals, at small schools or in the field including in the developing world. What is being done and what more can be done to ensure that everyone everywhere has access to life-saving medical information.

How to search scientific literature:
This session is moderated by Christina Pikas and John Dupuis:

There are so many nifty tricks and strategies for searching the literature that an average scientist is not aware of. So: Ask the experts – the science librarians!

ScienceOnline09 – an interview with David Kroll

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Here is the sixth interview in the series on Miss Baker’s Biology class blog – Anna’s interview with David Kroll.
Previously in this series:
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with…me!
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Eric Roston
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Clinton Colmenares
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Erica Tsai
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Brian Switek

ScienceOnline09 – Rhetoric of science

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You already know that the Program for ScienceOnline09 contains several sessions that look, from different angles, at the question of reputation and authority in science, online and offline.
Related to this, as a recent lively discussion on science blogs demonstrated, is the question of the use of language. So, it is quite fitting that we have a session planned just about this topic:
Rhetoric of science: print vs. web:
This session is moderated by Christian Casper and Neil Caudle:

There is no doubt that online communication environment is changing the way we use language. LOL. Scientific papers are an example of some of the most unreadable literature in existence, yet now that it is all online, will this change? Is the public access to papers going to induce scientists to keep lay audience in mind, as well as their scientific peers, when writing their manuscripts? Should readers’ comments and notes on papers be more formal than the comments on blogs? Why?

ScienceOnline09 – tapping into the hive-mind

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Continuing with the series of posts highlighting sessions in the Program at the upcoming ScienceOnline09, here are some sessions that deal with collaboration and networking between scientists and between their data.
Community intelligence applied to gene annotation:
This session is moderated by Andrew Su and John Hogenesch:

Despite identification of the ~25,000 genes which comprise the “parts list” of the human genome, researchers continue to largely study previously-studied genes, leaving half of the genes in the human genome virtually unannotated. Moreover, there is growing recognition that under-resourced curators at official annotation centers will be overwhelmed with the pace of scientific discovery. This session will explore the application of community intelligence principles (“crowdsourcing”) to the goal of genome-wide gene annotation. As a starting point for the discussion, we will overview several recent efforts in this area, including the Gene Wiki, WikiProteins, WikiPathways, and WikiGenes. We will also overview BioGPS, an extensible and customizable gene portal that allows the entire scientific community to collaboratively build a gene annotation portal. Issues to be discussed include data reliability, credit and incentives, and community-building.
Links:
Gene Wiki (websitepaper)
WikiProteins (websitepaper)
WikiPathways (websitepaper)
WikiGenes (websitepaper)
BioGPS (website)

Semantic web in science: how to build it, how to use it:
This session is moderated by John Wilbanks:

Connections, connections, connections (as Miss Frizzle would say). What is new and what else needs to be done to make data “talk” to each other? What will it all mean?

Open Notebook Science – how to do it right (if you should do it at all):
This session is moderated by Jean-Claude Bradley and Cameron Neylon:

Some scientists are now putting their entire, detailed lab notebooks online and updating them in real time. How is this done? Why is this done? What are the pros and cons? Is this something you should consider doing?
For a good current discussion see the Wikipedia entry of Open Notebook Science.

Social networking for scientists:
This session is moderated by Cameron Neylon and Deepak Singh:

It seems that everyone is developing ‘facebooks’ for scientists these days. But they are not catching on. Why? What will make one of them a success one day?

ScienceOnline09 – an Interview with Brian Switek

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Here is the fifth interview in the series on Miss Baker’s Biology class blog – Stephen’s interview with Brian Switek.
Previously in this series:
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with…me!
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Eric Roston
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Clinton Colmenares
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Erica Tsai

ScienceOnline09 – arts and humanities

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Let’s look at few other sessions on the Program – on topics that are rarely seen at either tech or science meetings:
Art and science — online and offline:
This session is moderated by Jessica Palmer and Glendon Mellow:

Art is not just illustration. And it is not the opposite of science (“Two Cultures”). How can the two work together and help each other?

Web and the History of Science:
This session is moderated by GG, Brian Switek, Scicurious and John McKay:

Why is History of Science important for scientists? How to blog about it. How does Open Access and the Web in general (Google Books in particular, for example) help/hinder the work of professional historians of science?

Science Fiction on Science Blogs?:
This session is moderated by Stephanie Zvan and Peggy Kolm:

Science fiction has inspired curiosity and enthusiasm in generations of children. How can science bloggers draw on SF’s power to entertain and educate? What science can we find in fiction beyond the old multi-page calculations of rocket trajectories? What does the practice of science look like in SF? In the past, scientists like Asimov and Clarke were the ones writing SF. Who’s producing the good stuff these days, and what makes a good bad example? Many modern SF writers blog too. What opportunities exist for cross-promotion and educating the writers? And which bloggers are already doing it all right?

ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Erica Tsai

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Here is the fourth interview in the series on Miss Baker’s Biology class blog – Samantha’s interview with Erica Tsai.
Previously in this series:
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with…me!
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Eric Roston
ScienceOnline09 – an interview with Clinton Colmenares

ScienceOnline09 – food, hotel, transportation

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If you are coming to ScienceOnline09, it’s time for you to reserve a hotel room, find a room-mate if you want, and organize your travel – do all of that here.
If you’ll be in town on Thursday evening, please sign up for the Early Bird Dinner so we can figure out the numbers and reserve the appropriate amount of space at Town Hall Grill.