Best of April 2011

I posted only 25 times in April.

The big news of the month is that The Open Laboratory project has a new publisher and a new guest editor.

April was not as busy month travel-wise as March (or upcoming May), but I did go to NYC once, and packed the two days with lots of work and fun which, among else, resulted in a new blog post at SciAm: Giant Dino exhibit at the American Museum of Natural History, or, why I should not be a photojournalist.

I keep interviewing attendees of ScienceOnline – there are two new ones this month: Dave Mosher and Alice Bell. More to come tomorrow…

I made sure that the Scientific American Guest Blog was busy all month as well, full of great posts on a diversity of topics – check them all out:

Under-represented and underserved: Why minority role models matter in STEM By Danielle N. Lee

Too Hard for Science?: Making astronauts with printers By Charles Q. Choi

What’s the deal with male circumcision and female cervical cancer? By Michelle Clement

Short Story Science: Lenina versus the Pneumococcus By Cindy Doran

World Health Day: Combat Drug Resistance By Gozde Zorlu

Radiation levels explained: An exposure infographic By Lena Groeger

Dear chemists By David Ropeik

Too Hard for Science?: The sense of meaning in dreams By Charles Q. Choi

Bambi or Bessie: Are wild animals happier? By Christie Wilcox

Regeneration: The axolotl story By David Manly

Too Hard for Science? The adventures of a biomolecule in a cell By Charles Q. Choi

Blaming parents: What I’ve learned and unlearned as a child psychiatrist By Justine Larson

Too Hard for Science? Creating naked singularities By Charles Q. Choi

Seafood At Risk: Dispersed Oil Poses a Long-Term Threat By Allie Wilkinson

Should everyone have access to life saving medicines? By David Ng

Trains, nukes, marriage, and vaccines (and anything else): Why the facts don’t matter By David Ropeik.

Too Hard for Science? Philip Zimbardo–creating millions of heroes By Charles Q. Choi.

Too Hard for Science? A digital panopticon By Charles Q. Choi.

Man discovers a new life-form at a South African truck stop By Rob Dunn.

Superfetation: Pregnant while already pregnant By Khalil A. Cassimally.

Animal Emotion: When Objectivity Fails By Kristina Bjoran.

Too Hard For Science? David Brin – Raising Animals to Human Levels of Intelligence By Charles Q. Choi.

And we continued the Arctic series on the Expeditions blog: The Catlin Arctic Survey: The science, The Catlin Arctic Survey: Thermohaline circulation, The Catlin Arctic Survey: A melting ocean by Victoria Hill.

Previously in the “Best of…” series:

2011

March
February
January

2010

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

2009

December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January

About these ads